Bandon Co.

Cork, Ireland

Bandon Co.

Cork, Ireland

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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.winespectator.com

Tee up a top dining experience at these golf destinations As summer approaches, recreational golf season is in full swing. The perfect excuse to take a vacation or just unwind on the weekend, a day spent on the course is tough to improve—except with the promise of great food and wine afterward. These 16 restaurants are in close proximity to world-class golfing, and their first-rate menus and award-winning wine programs will ensure you finish the day a winner. To check out more wine and food destinations, see Wine Spectator’s more than 3,500 Restaurant Award–winning picks, including the 85 Grand Award recipients worldwide that hold our highest honor. Do you have a favorite you’d like to see on this list? Send your recommendations to restaurantawards@mshanken.com. We want to hear from you! Fairmont at the Grand Del Mar, 5200 Grand Del Mar Way, San Diego, Calif. Telephone (858) 314-1900 Website www.addisondelmar.com Open Dinner, Tuesday to Saturday Grand Award In San Diego, the Fairmont at the Grand Del Mar's restaurant Addison provides prime dining for golf and wine lovers. Work up an appetite at the resort’s own 18-hole Grand Golf Club (which the dining room overlooks), or opt for one of the many first-rate courses nearby. Chef William Bradley’s menu changes with the seasons, emphasizing local ingredients, with French flair, while wine director Rafael Sanchez’ Grand Award–winning, 3,200-selection list goes big with Burgundy, California, Italy, Bordeaux, the Rhône, Spain, Germany and Champagne. Now open for more than 60 years, Bern’s Steak House is a Tampa institution in close proximity to a wealth of golf courses. The restaurant is renowned not only for its dry-aged steaks and fresh produce grown on the Bern’s farm, but also for its colossal wine list. Bern’s has been a recipient of the Grand Award since 1981; today its list has 6,800 selections, including more than 200 wines available by the glass. For those with any room left after steaks, one of the restaurant’s unique features is the Harry Waugh Dessert Room, where guests can enjoy nearly 50 desserts, along with Ports, Sherries and Madeiras. A stone’s throw from the Atlantic Ocean, the restaurant now called HMF at the Breakers has earned a Grand Award at the resort since 1981, and today serves creative small plates under its vaulted ceilings and chandeliers that evoke old-school Palm Beach. The glamor is enhanced by HMF’s massive and meticulously organized 2,000-selection wine list, overseen by wine director and Master Sommelier Virginia Philip, with strengths in Burgundy, Bordeaux, California, Italy, the Rhône, Spain and Champagne. The Breakers boasts two high-caliber golf courses: the historic Ocean Course, created in 1896, and the Rees Jones Course, a more modern counterpart 10 miles from the resort grounds. For an East Coast golf retreat that aces wine and dining, head to Crystal Springs Resort in northwestern New Jersey. The resort is home to six golf courses for all skill levels, as well as a Grand Award–winning wine cellar at its Restaurant Latour. Chef Anthony Becco’s contemporary American fare can be enjoyed in the form of the five-course “Anthology” menu, where guests choose dishes from five different categories, or the seven-course chef’s tasting menu. The 7,200-selection wine list has earned a Grand Award since 2006; highlighting bottles from Bordeaux, California, Burgundy, Italy, the Rhône, Champagne and Oregon, the program is managed by wine director Robby Younes. LaPlaya Beach & Golf Resort, 9891 Gulf Shore Drive, Naples, Fla. Telephone (239) 598-5707 Website www.laplayaresort.com Open Lunch and dinner, daily [Closed for maintenance June 5–12, 2017 and August 14–21, 2017] Best of Award of Excellence Naples, Fla., is a popular travel destination for golfers, and LaPlaya Beach & Golf Resort is among its draws. The resort’s Baleen restaurant overlooks the waves, with a few tables on the beach itself. Chef John Sexton’s menu enhances the seaside atmosphere with a focus on seafood, offering dishes like bayou mussels, blackened gulf grouper and seared sea scallops with coconut cauliflower puree. Wine director Martin Diehr’s 1,080-selection list has earned a Best of Award of Excellence since 2011 and homes in on wines from California, Burgundy, Italy, Bordeaux, Argentina and Washington. You can hit the links at the resort's own course or one of several nearby. 8 New Orleans Road, Hilton Head Island, S.C. Telephone (843) 785-9277 Website charliesgreenstar.com Open Lunch and dinner, Monday to Saturday Best of Award of Excellence Some of the best golfing in the country can be found on Hilton Head Island, with its abundance of courses and pristine beaches. After a day in the South Carolina sun, cool down with a great meal and a glass of wine at Best of Award of Excellence winner Charlie's L'Etoile Verte. Having earned its first Restaurant Award in 1993, the restaurant has accumulated an impressive cellar. Today, wine director and owner Margaret Pearman’s list spans 625 selections, with a focus on California, the Rhône and Bordeaux. Chef Lloyd Alberson’s menu celebrates seafood with dishes like Parmesan-crusted tilapia, blackened redfish and locally caught mahi mahi with mango vinaigrette. Bandon Dunes Golf Resort, 57744 Round Lake Road, Bandon, Ore. Telephone (541) 347-5220 Website www.bandondunesgolf.com Open Lunch and dinner, daily Best of Award of Excellence Surrounded by rugged natural beauty, Bandon Dunes Golf Resort on southern Oregon’s Pacific coast boasts five distinct golf courses. Close out the day in style at its Best of Award of Excellence–winning Gallery Restaurant, and enjoy chef Don McCradic’s seasonal dishes like tempura Dungeness crab, lamb chops with new potatoes and pork cheeks with spinach-chorizo risotto. The 555-selection wine list pays tribute to local bounty with an abundance of bottles from Oregon, and also features favorites from California, Washington, France and Italy. Sea Island, Ga., impresses with peaceful beaches, jaw-dropping views and plethora of golfing experiences. Sea Island alone offers three 18-hole courses, as well as classes and a professional golf center. At the end of the day, unwind at the resort’s Best of Award of Excellence–winning Georgian Room restaurant, where wine director Ryanne Carrier’s list showcases 1,600 selections, with a focus on Bordeaux, Burgundy, California, Italy, Australia and Portugal. Chef Julian Scheibel’s menu is a perfect complement, with dishes like tagliatelle with uni and crème fraîche, butter-poached Maine lobster and wagyu beef Rossini with foie gras. 330 A1A N., Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Telephone (904) 273-7980 Website www.jjbistro.com Open Dinner, Tuesday to Saturday; lunch, Monday to Saturday Best of Award of Excellence Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, Ponte Vedra Beach is one of the nation’s top golf destinations: The PGA Tour is headquartered there, and its home club, TPC Sawgrass, hosts the annual Players Championship, taking place this week. And the town is no slouch on the culinary front. At JJ’s Liberty Bistro, owner JJ Vigoureux oversees the Best of Award of Excellence–winning 625-selection wine program, which highlights California, Burgundy and Bordeaux. On the French-inspired menu, find baked brie en croute, lobster bisque, moules frites and grilled beef tenderloin with foie gras butter. After the meal, head next door to the restaurant’s chocolate shop for ice cream and other sweet treats. The Greenbrier, 300 W. Main St., White Sulphur Springs, W.V. Telephone (855) 729-3778 Website www.greenbrier.com Open Dinner, daily Best of Award of Excellence Situated in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia, the Greenbrier has been a travel destination since its founding in 1778; guests have long come to bathe in its restorative spring waters. Today, the resort’s five golf courses—some host to PGA Tour events—as well as picturesque grounds, casino, mineral spa and renowned dining attract patrons from around the globe. The wine list at the resort’s upscale Main Dining Room, overseen by Brian McClure, earned a Best of Award of Excellence in 2016 for its 1,165 selections, many from California, Burgundy, Italy, Bordeaux, Spain and Oregon. Maui famously provides myriad golf options, and when it comes to wine and dining, the island delivers in spades as well. Best of Award of Excellence winner Merriman’s Kapalua is a particularly good choice. Sift through wine director Dave Horsman’s 690-selection list, featuring depth in Burgundy, California and Italy. Chef Peter Merriman’s menu captures the flavors of the island with eclectic dishes like Kalua pig and sweet onion quesadilla with kimchi, wok-charred ahi sashimi and pan-seared diver scallops with macadamia nut brown rice. The Ritz-Carlton Grande Lakes, 4012 Central Florida Parkway, Orlando, Fla. Telephone (407) 393-4333 Website www. www.normans.com Open Dinner, daily Best of Award of Excellence Central Florida's sunny weather and natural beauty make it a first-rate setting for numerous great golf courses, including the Ritz-Carlton Grande Lakes’ own 18-hole Golf Club Orlando. Don’t miss the resort’s Best of Award of Excellence–winning restaurant, Norman’s, where James Beard Award winner Norman van Aken’s menu blends Latin, Caribbean, Asian and European influences to create dishes like Brazilian-style conch chowder, Serrano ham–crusted sea bass and a 22-ounce dry-aged, bone-in rib eye with Spanish potato torta. The wine list, engineered by wine director Yusuf Yildiz, offers 630 selections, with a focus on California, Bordeaux and Italy. In the Appalachian Mountains, surrounded by the Nantahala National Forest, the North Carolina town of Highlands is a great base camp for chasing waterfalls, hiking trails and golfing. Despite the bucolic setting, the dining is top-notch. After a day in the great outdoors, try Ristorante Paoletti, a Best of Award of Excellence winner since 2005, and select one of the 750 choices on wine director and owner Arthur Paoletti’s list, which showcases Tuscany, Piedmont, California, Bordeaux and Burgundy. The Italian menu is full of hearty classics like ricotta and basil gnocchi, eggplant lasagna and veal chop marsala, as well as lighter seafood options like grilled North Carolina rainbow trout. The Lodge At Pebble Beach, 1700 17 Mile Drive, Pebble Beach, Calif. Telephone (831) 625-8524 Website www.pebblebeach.com Open Lunch and dinner, daily Best of Award of Excellence On California’s Monterey Peninsula, the Lodge at Pebble Beach boasts five picturesque golf courses. Overlooking Carmel Bay and the gorgeous 18th hole of the Pebble Beach Golf Links is the resort’s Best of Award of Excellence–winning gem, Stillwater Bar & Grill. The restaurant’s wine program, overseen by Wendy Heilmann, offers plenty of pours for diners taking in the stunning views. With over 1,000 selections, the list concentrates on California, Burgundy, Bordeaux, the Rhône and Italy—a lovely match for chef Jeremy Tummel’s California-inspired seafood-focused cuisine. Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North, 10600 E. Crescent Moon Drive, Scottsdale, Ariz. Telephone (480) 513-5085 Website talaverarestaurant.com Open Dinner, Monday to Saturday Best of Award of Excellence In the foothills of Pinnacle Peak at the Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale, Talavera is a wine-and-dining lover’s dream, with evocative desert views. The resort is home to two golf courses—the Pinnacle and the Monument—and also provides free shuttle service to the nearby Troon North Golf Club. Talavera wine director Shaun Adams’ program has earned Restaurant Awards since 2005 for its impressive cellar of bottles from California, Burgundy, Bordeaux and Italy. Chef Chuck Kazmer’s farm-to-table cooking is steak-centric, but he also serves up eclectic dishes like foie gras bánh mì, bacon-wrapped buffalo tenderloin and Chilean sea bass with a pecan-herb crust. At the Arizona Biltmore, golf and dine to your heart’s content: The resort boasts two 18-hole courses, as well as a classic restaurant, Wright’s at the Biltmore. Chef Brian Peterson’s menu presents seared foie gras with huckleberry buckle and foie gras ice cream, beet-cured salmon with chicharrón and grapefruit, buffalo rib eye with buffalo chorizo and smoked veal T-bone with blue corn cakes. The 350-selection, moderately priced wine list, managed by wine director Dolan Olson, is especially strong in California and Bordeaux, and earned its first Award of Excellence in 2015.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

For those looking for new homes in Florence, dealing with a real estate broker would be the best option. ​It is the professional appeal and those elegant touches that make any property or open house even more enticing to the buyers. If properly planned out along with professional look, an open house can be even more attractive than it is supposed to be. Here having professional assistance and right tools is a must. At Century 21 Best Realty, the experts can offer a professional touch to new homes in Florence OR to draw the attention of the prospective buyers. Since its establishment, they have been serving different parts of Coos Bay, OR, Bandon OR, and Coquille OR. For those who are in search of good homes for sale, the company is right there to help them by offering them such homes at the best prices. Over the years, they have garnered a good reputation owning to commitment, energy, passion and stringent code of ethics. They also have a comprehensive range of commercial and industrial properties. The experts are fully certified and licensed in handling various kinds of real estate needs. They specialize in different forms of land, including farms, recreational land, waterfront properties, recreational land, timberland, hunting land and much more. Since buying is a terribly complicated process, it requires expert handling. Century 21 Best Realty is one such company that has emerged as a leading real estate firm, dealing with thousands of clients providing quality service all the way. They are fully motivated to provide quality service to their clients. They are also friendly courteous and honest while dealing with their esteemed customers. Whether it is about land for sale or a new home, the expert agents are always there to help their customers and deliver the best solution at the hour of need. To learn more about the real estate broker in Florence OR and other services, visit http://www.c21bestrealty.com Century 21 Best Realty Inc is a reputed company that has been serving all their clients with the best real estate needs. They have got a huge list of flats and the expert professionals make sure that the best service is delivered to their clients.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

The reputable real estate agent is the one who knows how to prepare a land for sale in Reedsport OR. ​While buying a home is not a terribly complicated process, buying a property without a home is so indeed. A purchase of a home is not that complicated since the buyers usually know what they like and what they are looking for. However, when it comes to purchasing a property without a home, namely a land, it can be a far more challenging process to make sure the property is a good fit for one’s building needs. CENTURY 21 Best Realty, Inc. is one such company that has come up with the best lands for sale in Florence, Reedsport, Bandon, Coos Bay, Coquille, North Bond, OR. They specialize in land properties of different varieties, both for residential as well as commercial purposes alike. Over the years, they have dealt with thousands of clients providing quality service all the way. Through their dedication and passion towards their clients, they have emerged as leading real estate agents in Florence OR. The realtors are fully motivated to provide quality service to their clients. They are also friendly, courteous and honest while dealing with their esteemed customers. Experience is the key when it comes to dealing with the land sale. Century 21 Best Realty Inc has the backing of experience. The collective experience of the real estate agents has set them apart from the others in the realty market. They are always engaged in the making plans and strategy to expedite the process of land sale, thereby, help their clients maintain clarity having put their mind to rest. They  always have answers to various queries of their clients regarding and property or land for sale in Reedsport OR. While dealing with the land sale, the experts can perform a routine inspection of all the assets that they provide to their clients and deliver the best solution at the hour of need. For more information on real estate agent in Florence OR, visit  http://www.c21bestrealty.com/blog/index.php/2016/11/16/real-estate-agent-in-florence-reedsport-north-bend-or/ Century 21 Best Realty Inc is a reputed company that has been serving all their clients with the best relocation needs. They have got a huge list of flats and the expert professionals make sure that the best service is delivered to their clients.


Pabiou T.,Bandon Co. | Pabiou T.,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences | Fikse W.F.,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences | Amer P.R.,AbacusBio Ltd | And 3 more authors.
Animal | Year: 2012

The objective of this study was to quantify the genetic associations between a range of carcass-related traits including wholesale cut weights predicted from video image analysis (VIA) technology, and a range of pre-slaughter performance traits in commercial Irish cattle. Predicted carcass cut weights comprised of cut weights based on retail value: lower value cuts (LVC), medium value cuts (MVC), high value cuts (HVC) and very high value cuts (VHVC), as well as total meat, fat and bone weights. Four main sources of data were used in the genetic analyses: price data of live animals collected from livestock auctions, live-weight data and linear type collected from both commercial and pedigree farms as well as from livestock auctions and weanling quality recorded on-farm. Heritability of carcass cut weights ranged from 0.21 to 0.39. Genetic correlations between the cut traits and the other performance traits were estimated using a series of bivariate sire linear mixed models where carcass cut weights were phenotypically adjusted to a constant carcass weight. Strongest positive genetic correlations were obtained between predicted carcass cut weights and carcass value (min rg(MVC) = 0.35; max r g(VHVC) = 0.69), and animal price at both weaning (min r g(MVC) = 0.37; max rg(VHVC) = 0.66) and post weaning (min rg(MVC) = 0.50; max rg(VHVC) = 0.67). Moderate genetic correlations were obtained between carcass cut weights and calf price (min rg(HVC) = 0.34; max rg(LVC) = 0.45), weanling quality (min rg(MVC) = 0.12; max rg(VHVC) = 0.49), linear scores for muscularity at both weaning (hindquarter development: min rg(MVC) = -0.06; max rg(VHVC) = 0.46), post weaning (hindquarter development: min rg(MVC) = 0.23; max rg(VHVC) = 0.44). The genetic correlations between total meat weight were consistent with those observed with the predicted wholesale cut weights. Total fat and total bone weights were generally negatively correlated with carcass value, auction prices and weanling quality. Total bone weight was, however, positively correlated with skeletal scores at weaning and post weaning. These results indicate that some traits collected early in life are moderate-to-strongly correlated with carcass cut weights predicted from VIA technology. This information can be used to improve the accuracy of selection for carcass cut weights in national genetic evaluations. © The Animal Consortium 2011.


PubMed | Cargo Inc, University College Dublin, Bandon Co. and AbacusBio Ltd
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of animal breeding and genetics = Zeitschrift fur Tierzuchtung und Zuchtungsbiologie | Year: 2016

It is sometimes possible to breed for more uniform individuals by selecting animals with a greater tendency to be less variable, that is, those with a smaller environmental variance. This approach has been applied to reproduction traits in various animal species. We have evaluated fecundity in the Irish Belclare sheep breed by analyses of flocks with differing average litter size (number of lambs per ewe per year, NLB) and have estimated the genetic variance in environmental variance of lambing traits using double hierarchical generalized linear models (DHGLM). The data set comprised of 9470 litter size records from 4407 ewes collected in 56 flocks. The percentage of pedigreed lambing ewes with singles, twins and triplets was 30, 54 and 14%, respectively, in 2013 and has been relatively constant for the last 15years. The variance of NLB increases with the mean in this data; the correlation of mean and standard deviation across sires is 0.50. The breeding goal is to increase the mean NLB without unduly increasing the incidence of triplets and higher litter sizes. The heritability estimates for lambing traits were NLB, 0.09; triplet occurrence (TRI) 0.07; and twin occurrence (TWN), 0.02. The highest and lowest twinning flocks differed by 23% (75% versus 52%) in the proportion of ewes lambing twins. Fitting bivariate sire models to NLB and the residual from the NLB model using a double hierarchical generalized linear model (DHGLM) model found a strong genetic correlation (0.880.07) between the sire effect for the magnitude of the residual (VE ) and sire effects for NLB, confirming the general observation that increased average litter size is associated with increased variability in litter size. We propose a threshold model that may help breeders with low litter size increase the percentage of twin bearers without unduly increasing the percentage of ewes bearing triplets in Belclare sheep.


Zhao F.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | McParland S.,Teagasc | Kearney F.,Bandon Co. | Du L.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Berry D.P.,Teagasc
Genetics Selection Evolution | Year: 2015

Background: Artificial selection for economically important traits in cattle is expected to have left distinctive selection signatures on the genome. Access to high-density genotypes facilitates the accurate identification of genomic regions that have undergone positive selection. These findings help to better elucidate the mechanisms of selection and to identify candidate genes of interest to breeding programs. Results: Information on 705 243 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3122 dairy and beef male animals from seven cattle breeds (Angus, Belgian Blue, Charolais, Hereford, Holstein-Friesian, Limousin and Simmental) were used to detect selection signatures by applying two complementary methods, integrated haplotype score (iHS) and global fixation index (FST). To control for false positive results, we used false discovery rate (FDR) adjustment to calculate adjusted iHS within each breed and the genome-wide significance level was about 0.003. Using the iHS method, 83, 92, 91, 101, 85, 101 and 86 significant genomic regions were detected for Angus, Belgian Blue, Charolais, Hereford, Holstein-Friesian, Limousin and Simmental cattle, respectively. None of these regions was common to all seven breeds. Using the FST approach, 704 individual SNPs were detected across breeds. Annotation of the regions of the genome that showed selection signatures revealed several interesting candidate genes i.e. DGAT1, ABCG2, MSTN, CAPN3, FABP3, CHCHD7, PLAG1, JAZF1, PRKG2, ACTC1, TBC1D1, GHR, BMP2, TSG1, LYN, KIT and MC1R that play a role in milk production, reproduction, body size, muscle formation or coat color. Fifty-seven common candidate genes were found by both the iHS and global FST methods across the seven breeds. Moreover, many novel genomic regions and genes were detected within the regions that showed selection signatures; for some candidate genes, signatures of positive selection exist in the human genome. Multilevel bioinformatic analyses of the detected candidate genes suggested that the PPAR pathway may have been subjected to positive selection. Conclusions: This study provides a high-resolution bovine genomic map of positive selection signatures that are either specific to one breed or common to a subset of the seven breeds analyzed. Our results will contribute to the detection of functional candidate genes that have undergone positive selection in future studies. © 2015 Zhao et al.


Mc Hugh N.,Teagasc | Mc Hugh N.,University College Dublin | Evans R.D.,Bandon Co | Amer P.R.,Abacus Biotech Ltd | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Animal Science | Year: 2011

Beef outputs from dairy farms make an important contribution to overall profitability in Irish dairy herds and are the sole source of revenue in many beef herds. The aim of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for animal BW and price across different stages of maturity. Data originated from 2 main sources: price and BW from livestock auctions and BW from on-farm weighings between 2000 and 2008. The data were divided into 4 distinct maturity categories: calves (n = 24,513), weanlings (n = 27,877), postweanlings (n = 23,279), and cows (n = 4,894). A univariate animal model used to estimate variance components was progressively built up to include a maternal genetic effect and a permanent environmental maternal effect. Bivariate analyses were used to estimate genetic covariances between BW and price per animal within and across maturity category. Direct heritability estimates for price per animal were 0.34 ± 0.03, 0.31 ± 0.05, 0.19 ± 0.04, and 0.10 ± 0.04 for calves, weanling, postweanlings, and cows, respectively. Direct heritability estimates for BW were 0.26 ± 0.03 for weanlings, 0.25 ± 0.04 for postweanlings, and 0.24 ± 0.06 for cows; no BW data were available on calves. Significant maternal genetic and maternal permanent environmental effects were observed for weanling BW only. The genetic correlation between price per animal and BW within each maturity group varied from 0.55 ± 0.06 (postweanling price and BW) to 0.91 ± 0.04 (cow price and BW). The availability of routinely collected data, along with the existence of ample genetic variation for animal BW and price per animal, facilitates their inclusion in Irish dairy and beef breeding objectives to better reflect the profitability of both enterprises. ©2011 American Society of Animal Science.


PubMed | Bandon Co., Teagasc and Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Type: | Journal: Genetics, selection, evolution : GSE | Year: 2015

Artificial selection for economically important traits in cattle is expected to have left distinctive selection signatures on the genome. Access to high-density genotypes facilitates the accurate identification of genomic regions that have undergone positive selection. These findings help to better elucidate the mechanisms of selection and to identify candidate genes of interest to breeding programs.Information on 705 243 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3122 dairy and beef male animals from seven cattle breeds (Angus, Belgian Blue, Charolais, Hereford, Holstein-Friesian, Limousin and Simmental) were used to detect selection signatures by applying two complementary methods, integrated haplotype score (iHS) and global fixation index (FST). To control for false positive results, we used false discovery rate (FDR) adjustment to calculate adjusted iHS within each breed and the genome-wide significance level was about 0.003. Using the iHS method, 83, 92, 91, 101, 85, 101 and 86 significant genomic regions were detected for Angus, Belgian Blue, Charolais, Hereford, Holstein-Friesian, Limousin and Simmental cattle, respectively. None of these regions was common to all seven breeds. Using the FST approach, 704 individual SNPs were detected across breeds. Annotation of the regions of the genome that showed selection signatures revealed several interesting candidate genes i.e. DGAT1, ABCG2, MSTN, CAPN3, FABP3, CHCHD7, PLAG1, JAZF1, PRKG2, ACTC1, TBC1D1, GHR, BMP2, TSG1, LYN, KIT and MC1R that play a role in milk production, reproduction, body size, muscle formation or coat color. Fifty-seven common candidate genes were found by both the iHS and global FST methods across the seven breeds. Moreover, many novel genomic regions and genes were detected within the regions that showed selection signatures; for some candidate genes, signatures of positive selection exist in the human genome. Multilevel bioinformatic analyses of the detected candidate genes suggested that the PPAR pathway may have been subjected to positive selection.This study provides a high-resolution bovine genomic map of positive selection signatures that are either specific to one breed or common to a subset of the seven breeds analyzed. Our results will contribute to the detection of functional candidate genes that have undergone positive selection in future studies.


PubMed | Teagasc, Bandon Co. and Reprodoc Ltd.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Theriogenology | Year: 2014

The objective of this study was to estimate the association between detailed reproductive phenotypes for cows categorized as divergent for phenotypic and genetic performance. The hypothesis was that higher yielding animals, either phenotypically or genetically, would have compromised ovarian and uterine reproductive performance. Detailed reproductive traits including multiple ovulations, cystic ovarian structures, corpus luteum (CL) presence, and uterine environment were available on 9675 ultrasound records from 8174 dairy lactating cows, calved between 10 and 70 days. Cows were categorized, within parity, into low, average, or high for each of the performance traits. There was a greater likelihood of multiple ovulations in cows with greater phenotypic yields (odds ratio: 1.53-1.81) and greater genetic merit for yield (odds ratio: 1.31-1.59) relative to lower performing contemporaries. After adjustment for genetic merit, a similar trend of increased odds (odds ratio: 1.29-1.87) of multiple ovulations in higher yielding cows was observed compared with the lowest yielding category. There was no association between either phenotypic milk composition or genetic merit for milk composition with the likelihood of multiple ovulations. The likelihood of cystic ovarian structures was highest in cows with greatest phenotypic milk yields (odds ratio: 2.75-3.24), greater genetic merit for milk yield (odds ratio: 1.30-1.51), and even after adjustment for genetic merit there was a greater likelihood of cystic ovarian structures in cows with the highest milk yields (odds ratio: 2.71-2.95), compared with cows in the lowest category for each of the milk traits. Cows with average phenotypic milk yields were more likely to have a CL, compared with the lowest yielding category (odds ratio: 1.20-1.23), and these associations remained after adjustment for genetic merit of the trait. The likelihood of CL presence was highest in cows with the lowest genetic merit for milk. Lower fat:protein ratio was associated with an increased likelihood of CL presence compared with cows with greater fat:protein ratio and cows with the highest phenotypic milk composition were more likely to have a CL compared with cows in the lowest composition category. Genetic predisposition to higher somatic cell score was associated with a reduced risk of multiple ovulations (odds ratio: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.55-0.87) but an increased likelihood of CL presence (odds ratio: 2.66; 95% CI: 2.09-3.37) and poorer uterine health score (odds ratio: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.20-1.55). There was a lower likelihood of multiple ovulations, cystic ovarian structures, and poorer uterine health and an increased likelihood of CL presence in cows with superior genetic merit for reproductive performance and survival.


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Bandon Corporation | Date: 2015-05-01

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