Berea, OH, United States

Baldwin Wallace University

www.bw.edu
Berea, OH, United States

Baldwin Wallace University is a 4-year private, coeducational, liberal arts college in Berea, Ohio, United States. The school was founded in 1845 as Baldwin Institute by Methodist settlers. Eventually the school merged with nearby German Wallace College in 1913 to become Baldwin–Wallace College. As of July 1, 2012 the school became Baldwin Wallace University. The institution offers a number of undergraduate and several graduate programs. Baldwin Wallace University is often referred to as simply "BW". BW has two campus sites: Berea, which serves as the main campus, and BW at Corporate College East in Warrensville Heights. Today BW enrolls around 3,050 full-time undergraduate students, 800 evening and weekend adult learners, and 830 graduate students. BW recruits students throughout Ohio but also students from all over the United States and internationally. Baldwin Wallace's motto is "Creating contributing, compassionate citizens of an increasingly global society." Baldwin Wallace's athletic teams compete as members of NCAA Division III athletics in the Ohio Athletic Conference.BW is known for its education, business, neuroscience, and music programs. BW is home to the Riemenschneider-Bach Institute and the Baldwin Wallace Conservatory of Music. The BW Conservatory holds the title for the oldest collegiate Bach Festival in the nation. Beyond this, the college's radio station is WBWC which is known throughout the Cleveland area. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its list of the best colleges and universities in Ohio for 2017. 50 four-year schools were ranked, with Ursuline College, Xavier University, Ohio Northern University, Case Western Reserve University and John Carroll University coming in as the top five. Of the 29 two-year schools that also made the cut, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, Belmont College, Sinclair College, Owens Community College and Columbus State Community College were in the top five. A complete list of schools is included below. “Earning a certificate or degree can be a major stepping stone for career development,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “These schools offer more than just educational opportunities, they represent Ohio’s best combination of education and employment resources that translate to strong post-college earnings for students.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Ohio” list, institutions must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit schools. Each college is also ranked on metrics like the variety of degree programs offered, the number of employment and academic resources offered, financial aid availability, graduation rates and annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Ohio” list, visit: http://www.learnhowtobecome.org/college/ohio/ Ohio’s Best Four-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Ashland University Baldwin Wallace University Bluffton University Bowling Green State University-Main Campus Capital University Case Western Reserve University Cedarville University Cleveland Institute of Art Cleveland State University Defiance College Denison University Franciscan University of Steubenville Franklin University Heidelberg University Hiram College John Carroll University Kent State University at Kent Kenyon College Lake Erie College Lourdes University Malone University Marietta College Miami University-Oxford Mount Saint Joseph University Mount Vernon Nazarene University Muskingum University Notre Dame College Oberlin College Ohio Dominican University Ohio Northern University Ohio State University-Main Campus Ohio State University-Mansfield Campus Ohio University-Main Campus Ohio Wesleyan University Otterbein University The College of Wooster The University of Findlay Union Institute & University University of Akron Main Campus University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Dayton University of Mount Union University of Toledo Ursuline College Walsh University Wilberforce University Wittenberg University Wright State University-Main Campus Xavier University Youngstown State University Ohio’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Belmont College Bowling Green State University-Firelands Central Ohio Technical College Choffin Career and Technical Center Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Clark State Community College Columbiana County Career and Technical Center Columbus State Community College Cuyahoga Community College Eastern Gateway Community College Edison State Community College Hocking College Lakeland Community College Lorain County Community College Marion Technical College North Central State College Northwest State Community College Ohio Institute of Allied Health Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute Owens Community College Remington College-Cleveland Campus Rhodes State College Sinclair College Southern State Community College Stark State College Terra State Community College University of Akron Wayne College Washington State Community College Zane State College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

WILMINGTON, Del., May 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Jack Remondi, president and CEO of Navient, the nation’s leading loan management, servicing and asset recovery company, delivered remarks at the company’s 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. Excerpts of his remarks are as follows: Navient employees including Pioneer, GRC, Gila and Xtend—nearly 7,000 strong—are the heart of this company. They work hard every day to deliver expertise and solutions that meet our customers’ unique and complex needs. Whether the client is a county court, a large federal agency, a hospital, or a college or university—or, their constituents—student loan borrowers, taxpayers, or patients—Team Navient is working to enhance their financial success. Thank you, Team Navient, for all you do every day to deliver value. I would also like to say thank you to our clients—for selecting us to help you advance your—and your constituents’—financial success. While we work with a variety of clients in different businesses, today I’ll focus on our work in the student loan space. There is significant public discussion about student loans, much of which fails to recognize the real issues facing families—rising college costs, inadequate information to make informed choices about where to attend and how much to spend given future career choices, and, most significantly, the risk of not completing. The focus of many media stories is on rising student loan debt, now estimated at $1.4 trillion. College is expensive and tuition costs rose at triple the rate of inflation in the past decade. Some borrowers do accumulate large debt balances and some struggle with the monthly payment—though they are often not the same individuals. Fortunately, the federal loan program is designed to help where income or life circumstances create the need for relief. The student loan program, however, looks very different than the picture often painted. Today, there are 44 million Americans with student loan debt. Of those, 84 percent borrowed less than $40,000. The majority who borrowed more than $40,000 did so to obtain a graduate degree, such as in medicine, law or business. While some who graduate do encounter financial challenges, the fact is that two-thirds of all defaults are among borrowers who borrowed less than $10,000. This is not the result of overborrowing for a degree; it’s the consequence of not graduating. Delinquency and default have fallen steadily and significantly since the end of the recession. Recent graduates are also benefiting from the strong employment market, reducing the early delinquency rates of new-to-repayment borrowers to one-third the rate of those who graduated near the end of the recession. What gets lost in the national conversation are the extraordinary opportunities that have been created for millions of Americans as a result of a college education. Young and old can attend an institution of their choice to pursue their own pathway or passion. This academic year, roughly 3.8 million college students will walk across the stage to receive an associate, bachelor’s or advanced degree—a record number. Nationally, 1 in 3 adults has a college degree—the highest educational attainment at any time in history. Millions of Americans are doing extraordinary things with their education. A school teacher inspiring the next generation of learners, a researcher testing new medicines, an entrepreneur whose new product idea not only fills a need but also creates jobs. Earning a college degree provides borrowers with these career opportunities, which in turn allows them to successfully manage their student loans. In 2016 alone, more than 500,000 Navient-serviced borrowers paid off their loans in full. Congratulations are in order for about 1,400 of our customers each day who achieve this milestone. Join me to celebrate some of these successes here today. Let’s start with Sarah, who graduated from East Tennessee State University and recently paid off her loans. “Without an education, I would not be able to do what I'm doing today, which I also happen to love,” she says. “I currently work in higher education, teaching and supporting students who remind me so much of myself when I started my own college journey as a first-generation college student. Grants, scholarships, loans, and my amazing mother helped me get where I am today.” Rayshawn graduated from Baldwin Wallace University and today is a successful software developer. “Once my career began to flourish I started paying more on my loans each month to get rid of the debt. I did not buy a brand new car or a house even though I could have. Instead, I made a goal to pay the student loan off first before getting into any more debt.” Rachell, a University of Tulsa graduate, credits her student loans with giving her the opportunity to change lives by working with hearing impaired people. “Being a first-generation university graduate, utilizing Navient's financial resources were imperative to my success,” she says. Millions of other customers are on the road to successful repayment. Melissa, a Northern Kentucky University graduate, is working for an accounting firm and has dreams of advancing to partner one day. Right now she’s studying for her CPA exam. “My college education has given me opportunities I may not have had without a bachelor's degree,” she says. To help keep her payments affordable, Melissa enrolled in income-driven repayment. Melissa says, “If you are experiencing difficulty making your monthly payments, there are so many options available to you.  Don't hide from your lenders. Work with them to help you manage your repayment plan.” This is great advice for new college graduates. We couldn’t agree more. In fact, staying in touch is one of the most important drivers of success. For the federal loans we service, we find that even if you’re a borrower who has missed one or several payments, 9 times out of 10, if we can talk to you, we can help you get back on track—a 90 percent success rate. We’re continually rolling out enhancements to make the student loan process even easier. 2016 was no exception as we implemented a new telephone system to more quickly connect customers with the specialized help they need, added online features to make payments easier, simplified the process to sign up for Auto Pay, and rolled out new career development and personal finance tools. And it’s working. Across the government loan program, delinquency and default rates are falling steadily and significantly. Program-wide delinquency rate is down 18 percent and the default rate is down 27 percent in the last two years. Also, the number of borrowers entering default last year is down 5 percent even as the number of borrowers in repayment has increased by 10 percent. I am proud of the significant role Navient has played in helping borrowers avoid default. In fact, we lead the way. Our federal loan customers are 31 percent less likely to default than borrowers at other servicers. If all other servicers achieved similar default prevention success, 300,000 fewer borrowers would have defaulted in 2015. It should be unnecessary to say, but these are clearly meaningful numbers, yet they are consistently ignored. But we don’t stop there. We also continue to advocate for enhancements to the federal student loan program, making recommendations large and small that we believe would make a meaningful, positive difference in the lives of millions of student loan borrowers. Among our recommendations are better upfront information before borrowing, a simplified repayment system, helping borrowers pay off early rather than delay and encouraging borrowers to engage with their servicers. There are other common sense steps that could also help, including a courtesy credit bureau retraction program to help those who previously missed payments but have now gotten back on track and are looking to clear up their credit to, say, buy a home. Clearly there are opportunities make further enhancements to the federal student loan program, but effective reform must start with a clear and accurate understanding of the facts—facts on borrowing levels, facts on who struggles and why, and facts on proven solutions that make a difference. For example, a focus on borrowers with higher than average loan balances won’t help the most common borrower who defaulted —the individual who borrowed relatively little and defaulted after dropping out of school. Our recommendations are based on the data we see from 40 years of working with tens of millions of customers. We’re eager to roll up our sleeves to work with the Administration, with Congress, and others to make these improvements or other good ideas come to life. It’s time to get it done. About Navient Navient (Nasdaq:NAVI) is a Fortune 500 company that provides asset management and business processing solutions to education, healthcare, and government clients at the federal, state, and local levels. The company helps its clients and millions of Americans achieve financial success through services and support. Headquartered in Wilmington, Del., Navient employs team members in western New York, northeastern Pennsylvania, Indiana, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and other locations. Learn more at navient.com.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

WILMINGTON, Del., May 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Jack Remondi, president and CEO of Navient, the nation’s leading loan management, servicing and asset recovery company, delivered remarks at the company’s 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. Excerpts of his remarks are as follows: Navient employees including Pioneer, GRC, Gila and Xtend—nearly 7,000 strong—are the heart of this company. They work hard every day to deliver expertise and solutions that meet our customers’ unique and complex needs. Whether the client is a county court, a large federal agency, a hospital, or a college or university—or, their constituents—student loan borrowers, taxpayers, or patients—Team Navient is working to enhance their financial success. Thank you, Team Navient, for all you do every day to deliver value. I would also like to say thank you to our clients—for selecting us to help you advance your—and your constituents’—financial success. While we work with a variety of clients in different businesses, today I’ll focus on our work in the student loan space. There is significant public discussion about student loans, much of which fails to recognize the real issues facing families—rising college costs, inadequate information to make informed choices about where to attend and how much to spend given future career choices, and, most significantly, the risk of not completing. The focus of many media stories is on rising student loan debt, now estimated at $1.4 trillion. College is expensive and tuition costs rose at triple the rate of inflation in the past decade. Some borrowers do accumulate large debt balances and some struggle with the monthly payment—though they are often not the same individuals. Fortunately, the federal loan program is designed to help where income or life circumstances create the need for relief. The student loan program, however, looks very different than the picture often painted. Today, there are 44 million Americans with student loan debt. Of those, 84 percent borrowed less than $40,000. The majority who borrowed more than $40,000 did so to obtain a graduate degree, such as in medicine, law or business. While some who graduate do encounter financial challenges, the fact is that two-thirds of all defaults are among borrowers who borrowed less than $10,000. This is not the result of overborrowing for a degree; it’s the consequence of not graduating. Delinquency and default have fallen steadily and significantly since the end of the recession. Recent graduates are also benefiting from the strong employment market, reducing the early delinquency rates of new-to-repayment borrowers to one-third the rate of those who graduated near the end of the recession. What gets lost in the national conversation are the extraordinary opportunities that have been created for millions of Americans as a result of a college education. Young and old can attend an institution of their choice to pursue their own pathway or passion. This academic year, roughly 3.8 million college students will walk across the stage to receive an associate, bachelor’s or advanced degree—a record number. Nationally, 1 in 3 adults has a college degree—the highest educational attainment at any time in history. Millions of Americans are doing extraordinary things with their education. A school teacher inspiring the next generation of learners, a researcher testing new medicines, an entrepreneur whose new product idea not only fills a need but also creates jobs. Earning a college degree provides borrowers with these career opportunities, which in turn allows them to successfully manage their student loans. In 2016 alone, more than 500,000 Navient-serviced borrowers paid off their loans in full. Congratulations are in order for about 1,400 of our customers each day who achieve this milestone. Join me to celebrate some of these successes here today. Let’s start with Sarah, who graduated from East Tennessee State University and recently paid off her loans. “Without an education, I would not be able to do what I'm doing today, which I also happen to love,” she says. “I currently work in higher education, teaching and supporting students who remind me so much of myself when I started my own college journey as a first-generation college student. Grants, scholarships, loans, and my amazing mother helped me get where I am today.” Rayshawn graduated from Baldwin Wallace University and today is a successful software developer. “Once my career began to flourish I started paying more on my loans each month to get rid of the debt. I did not buy a brand new car or a house even though I could have. Instead, I made a goal to pay the student loan off first before getting into any more debt.” Rachell, a University of Tulsa graduate, credits her student loans with giving her the opportunity to change lives by working with hearing impaired people. “Being a first-generation university graduate, utilizing Navient's financial resources were imperative to my success,” she says. Millions of other customers are on the road to successful repayment. Melissa, a Northern Kentucky University graduate, is working for an accounting firm and has dreams of advancing to partner one day. Right now she’s studying for her CPA exam. “My college education has given me opportunities I may not have had without a bachelor's degree,” she says. To help keep her payments affordable, Melissa enrolled in income-driven repayment. Melissa says, “If you are experiencing difficulty making your monthly payments, there are so many options available to you.  Don't hide from your lenders. Work with them to help you manage your repayment plan.” This is great advice for new college graduates. We couldn’t agree more. In fact, staying in touch is one of the most important drivers of success. For the federal loans we service, we find that even if you’re a borrower who has missed one or several payments, 9 times out of 10, if we can talk to you, we can help you get back on track—a 90 percent success rate. We’re continually rolling out enhancements to make the student loan process even easier. 2016 was no exception as we implemented a new telephone system to more quickly connect customers with the specialized help they need, added online features to make payments easier, simplified the process to sign up for Auto Pay, and rolled out new career development and personal finance tools. And it’s working. Across the government loan program, delinquency and default rates are falling steadily and significantly. Program-wide delinquency rate is down 18 percent and the default rate is down 27 percent in the last two years. Also, the number of borrowers entering default last year is down 5 percent even as the number of borrowers in repayment has increased by 10 percent. I am proud of the significant role Navient has played in helping borrowers avoid default. In fact, we lead the way. Our federal loan customers are 31 percent less likely to default than borrowers at other servicers. If all other servicers achieved similar default prevention success, 300,000 fewer borrowers would have defaulted in 2015. It should be unnecessary to say, but these are clearly meaningful numbers, yet they are consistently ignored. But we don’t stop there. We also continue to advocate for enhancements to the federal student loan program, making recommendations large and small that we believe would make a meaningful, positive difference in the lives of millions of student loan borrowers. Among our recommendations are better upfront information before borrowing, a simplified repayment system, helping borrowers pay off early rather than delay and encouraging borrowers to engage with their servicers. There are other common sense steps that could also help, including a courtesy credit bureau retraction program to help those who previously missed payments but have now gotten back on track and are looking to clear up their credit to, say, buy a home. Clearly there are opportunities make further enhancements to the federal student loan program, but effective reform must start with a clear and accurate understanding of the facts—facts on borrowing levels, facts on who struggles and why, and facts on proven solutions that make a difference. For example, a focus on borrowers with higher than average loan balances won’t help the most common borrower who defaulted —the individual who borrowed relatively little and defaulted after dropping out of school. Our recommendations are based on the data we see from 40 years of working with tens of millions of customers. We’re eager to roll up our sleeves to work with the Administration, with Congress, and others to make these improvements or other good ideas come to life. It’s time to get it done. About Navient Navient (Nasdaq:NAVI) is a Fortune 500 company that provides asset management and business processing solutions to education, healthcare, and government clients at the federal, state, and local levels. The company helps its clients and millions of Americans achieve financial success through services and support. Headquartered in Wilmington, Del., Navient employs team members in western New York, northeastern Pennsylvania, Indiana, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and other locations. Learn more at navient.com.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

WILMINGTON, Del., May 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Jack Remondi, president and CEO of Navient, the nation’s leading loan management, servicing and asset recovery company, delivered remarks at the company’s 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. Excerpts of his remarks are as follows: Navient employees including Pioneer, GRC, Gila and Xtend—nearly 7,000 strong—are the heart of this company. They work hard every day to deliver expertise and solutions that meet our customers’ unique and complex needs. Whether the client is a county court, a large federal agency, a hospital, or a college or university—or, their constituents—student loan borrowers, taxpayers, or patients—Team Navient is working to enhance their financial success. Thank you, Team Navient, for all you do every day to deliver value. I would also like to say thank you to our clients—for selecting us to help you advance your—and your constituents’—financial success. While we work with a variety of clients in different businesses, today I’ll focus on our work in the student loan space. There is significant public discussion about student loans, much of which fails to recognize the real issues facing families—rising college costs, inadequate information to make informed choices about where to attend and how much to spend given future career choices, and, most significantly, the risk of not completing. The focus of many media stories is on rising student loan debt, now estimated at $1.4 trillion. College is expensive and tuition costs rose at triple the rate of inflation in the past decade. Some borrowers do accumulate large debt balances and some struggle with the monthly payment—though they are often not the same individuals. Fortunately, the federal loan program is designed to help where income or life circumstances create the need for relief. The student loan program, however, looks very different than the picture often painted. Today, there are 44 million Americans with student loan debt. Of those, 84 percent borrowed less than $40,000. The majority who borrowed more than $40,000 did so to obtain a graduate degree, such as in medicine, law or business. While some who graduate do encounter financial challenges, the fact is that two-thirds of all defaults are among borrowers who borrowed less than $10,000. This is not the result of overborrowing for a degree; it’s the consequence of not graduating. Delinquency and default have fallen steadily and significantly since the end of the recession. Recent graduates are also benefiting from the strong employment market, reducing the early delinquency rates of new-to-repayment borrowers to one-third the rate of those who graduated near the end of the recession. What gets lost in the national conversation are the extraordinary opportunities that have been created for millions of Americans as a result of a college education. Young and old can attend an institution of their choice to pursue their own pathway or passion. This academic year, roughly 3.8 million college students will walk across the stage to receive an associate, bachelor’s or advanced degree—a record number. Nationally, 1 in 3 adults has a college degree—the highest educational attainment at any time in history. Millions of Americans are doing extraordinary things with their education. A school teacher inspiring the next generation of learners, a researcher testing new medicines, an entrepreneur whose new product idea not only fills a need but also creates jobs. Earning a college degree provides borrowers with these career opportunities, which in turn allows them to successfully manage their student loans. In 2016 alone, more than 500,000 Navient-serviced borrowers paid off their loans in full. Congratulations are in order for about 1,400 of our customers each day who achieve this milestone. Join me to celebrate some of these successes here today. Let’s start with Sarah, who graduated from East Tennessee State University and recently paid off her loans. “Without an education, I would not be able to do what I'm doing today, which I also happen to love,” she says. “I currently work in higher education, teaching and supporting students who remind me so much of myself when I started my own college journey as a first-generation college student. Grants, scholarships, loans, and my amazing mother helped me get where I am today.” Rayshawn graduated from Baldwin Wallace University and today is a successful software developer. “Once my career began to flourish I started paying more on my loans each month to get rid of the debt. I did not buy a brand new car or a house even though I could have. Instead, I made a goal to pay the student loan off first before getting into any more debt.” Rachell, a University of Tulsa graduate, credits her student loans with giving her the opportunity to change lives by working with hearing impaired people. “Being a first-generation university graduate, utilizing Navient's financial resources were imperative to my success,” she says. Millions of other customers are on the road to successful repayment. Melissa, a Northern Kentucky University graduate, is working for an accounting firm and has dreams of advancing to partner one day. Right now she’s studying for her CPA exam. “My college education has given me opportunities I may not have had without a bachelor's degree,” she says. To help keep her payments affordable, Melissa enrolled in income-driven repayment. Melissa says, “If you are experiencing difficulty making your monthly payments, there are so many options available to you.  Don't hide from your lenders. Work with them to help you manage your repayment plan.” This is great advice for new college graduates. We couldn’t agree more. In fact, staying in touch is one of the most important drivers of success. For the federal loans we service, we find that even if you’re a borrower who has missed one or several payments, 9 times out of 10, if we can talk to you, we can help you get back on track—a 90 percent success rate. We’re continually rolling out enhancements to make the student loan process even easier. 2016 was no exception as we implemented a new telephone system to more quickly connect customers with the specialized help they need, added online features to make payments easier, simplified the process to sign up for Auto Pay, and rolled out new career development and personal finance tools. And it’s working. Across the government loan program, delinquency and default rates are falling steadily and significantly. Program-wide delinquency rate is down 18 percent and the default rate is down 27 percent in the last two years. Also, the number of borrowers entering default last year is down 5 percent even as the number of borrowers in repayment has increased by 10 percent. I am proud of the significant role Navient has played in helping borrowers avoid default. In fact, we lead the way. Our federal loan customers are 31 percent less likely to default than borrowers at other servicers. If all other servicers achieved similar default prevention success, 300,000 fewer borrowers would have defaulted in 2015. It should be unnecessary to say, but these are clearly meaningful numbers, yet they are consistently ignored. But we don’t stop there. We also continue to advocate for enhancements to the federal student loan program, making recommendations large and small that we believe would make a meaningful, positive difference in the lives of millions of student loan borrowers. Among our recommendations are better upfront information before borrowing, a simplified repayment system, helping borrowers pay off early rather than delay and encouraging borrowers to engage with their servicers. There are other common sense steps that could also help, including a courtesy credit bureau retraction program to help those who previously missed payments but have now gotten back on track and are looking to clear up their credit to, say, buy a home. Clearly there are opportunities make further enhancements to the federal student loan program, but effective reform must start with a clear and accurate understanding of the facts—facts on borrowing levels, facts on who struggles and why, and facts on proven solutions that make a difference. For example, a focus on borrowers with higher than average loan balances won’t help the most common borrower who defaulted —the individual who borrowed relatively little and defaulted after dropping out of school. Our recommendations are based on the data we see from 40 years of working with tens of millions of customers. We’re eager to roll up our sleeves to work with the Administration, with Congress, and others to make these improvements or other good ideas come to life. It’s time to get it done. About Navient Navient (Nasdaq:NAVI) is a Fortune 500 company that provides asset management and business processing solutions to education, healthcare, and government clients at the federal, state, and local levels. The company helps its clients and millions of Americans achieve financial success through services and support. Headquartered in Wilmington, Del., Navient employs team members in western New York, northeastern Pennsylvania, Indiana, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and other locations. Learn more at navient.com.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

WILMINGTON, Del., May 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Jack Remondi, president and CEO of Navient, the nation’s leading loan management, servicing and asset recovery company, delivered remarks at the company’s 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. Excerpts of his remarks are as follows: Navient employees including Pioneer, GRC, Gila and Xtend—nearly 7,000 strong—are the heart of this company. They work hard every day to deliver expertise and solutions that meet our customers’ unique and complex needs. Whether the client is a county court, a large federal agency, a hospital, or a college or university—or, their constituents—student loan borrowers, taxpayers, or patients—Team Navient is working to enhance their financial success. Thank you, Team Navient, for all you do every day to deliver value. I would also like to say thank you to our clients—for selecting us to help you advance your—and your constituents’—financial success. While we work with a variety of clients in different businesses, today I’ll focus on our work in the student loan space. There is significant public discussion about student loans, much of which fails to recognize the real issues facing families—rising college costs, inadequate information to make informed choices about where to attend and how much to spend given future career choices, and, most significantly, the risk of not completing. The focus of many media stories is on rising student loan debt, now estimated at $1.4 trillion. College is expensive and tuition costs rose at triple the rate of inflation in the past decade. Some borrowers do accumulate large debt balances and some struggle with the monthly payment—though they are often not the same individuals. Fortunately, the federal loan program is designed to help where income or life circumstances create the need for relief. The student loan program, however, looks very different than the picture often painted. Today, there are 44 million Americans with student loan debt. Of those, 84 percent borrowed less than $40,000. The majority who borrowed more than $40,000 did so to obtain a graduate degree, such as in medicine, law or business. While some who graduate do encounter financial challenges, the fact is that two-thirds of all defaults are among borrowers who borrowed less than $10,000. This is not the result of overborrowing for a degree; it’s the consequence of not graduating. Delinquency and default have fallen steadily and significantly since the end of the recession. Recent graduates are also benefiting from the strong employment market, reducing the early delinquency rates of new-to-repayment borrowers to one-third the rate of those who graduated near the end of the recession. What gets lost in the national conversation are the extraordinary opportunities that have been created for millions of Americans as a result of a college education. Young and old can attend an institution of their choice to pursue their own pathway or passion. This academic year, roughly 3.8 million college students will walk across the stage to receive an associate, bachelor’s or advanced degree—a record number. Nationally, 1 in 3 adults has a college degree—the highest educational attainment at any time in history. Millions of Americans are doing extraordinary things with their education. A school teacher inspiring the next generation of learners, a researcher testing new medicines, an entrepreneur whose new product idea not only fills a need but also creates jobs. Earning a college degree provides borrowers with these career opportunities, which in turn allows them to successfully manage their student loans. In 2016 alone, more than 500,000 Navient-serviced borrowers paid off their loans in full. Congratulations are in order for about 1,400 of our customers each day who achieve this milestone. Join me to celebrate some of these successes here today. Let’s start with Sarah, who graduated from East Tennessee State University and recently paid off her loans. “Without an education, I would not be able to do what I'm doing today, which I also happen to love,” she says. “I currently work in higher education, teaching and supporting students who remind me so much of myself when I started my own college journey as a first-generation college student. Grants, scholarships, loans, and my amazing mother helped me get where I am today.” Rayshawn graduated from Baldwin Wallace University and today is a successful software developer. “Once my career began to flourish I started paying more on my loans each month to get rid of the debt. I did not buy a brand new car or a house even though I could have. Instead, I made a goal to pay the student loan off first before getting into any more debt.” Rachell, a University of Tulsa graduate, credits her student loans with giving her the opportunity to change lives by working with hearing impaired people. “Being a first-generation university graduate, utilizing Navient's financial resources were imperative to my success,” she says. Millions of other customers are on the road to successful repayment. Melissa, a Northern Kentucky University graduate, is working for an accounting firm and has dreams of advancing to partner one day. Right now she’s studying for her CPA exam. “My college education has given me opportunities I may not have had without a bachelor's degree,” she says. To help keep her payments affordable, Melissa enrolled in income-driven repayment. Melissa says, “If you are experiencing difficulty making your monthly payments, there are so many options available to you.  Don't hide from your lenders. Work with them to help you manage your repayment plan.” This is great advice for new college graduates. We couldn’t agree more. In fact, staying in touch is one of the most important drivers of success. For the federal loans we service, we find that even if you’re a borrower who has missed one or several payments, 9 times out of 10, if we can talk to you, we can help you get back on track—a 90 percent success rate. We’re continually rolling out enhancements to make the student loan process even easier. 2016 was no exception as we implemented a new telephone system to more quickly connect customers with the specialized help they need, added online features to make payments easier, simplified the process to sign up for Auto Pay, and rolled out new career development and personal finance tools. And it’s working. Across the government loan program, delinquency and default rates are falling steadily and significantly. Program-wide delinquency rate is down 18 percent and the default rate is down 27 percent in the last two years. Also, the number of borrowers entering default last year is down 5 percent even as the number of borrowers in repayment has increased by 10 percent. I am proud of the significant role Navient has played in helping borrowers avoid default. In fact, we lead the way. Our federal loan customers are 31 percent less likely to default than borrowers at other servicers. If all other servicers achieved similar default prevention success, 300,000 fewer borrowers would have defaulted in 2015. It should be unnecessary to say, but these are clearly meaningful numbers, yet they are consistently ignored. But we don’t stop there. We also continue to advocate for enhancements to the federal student loan program, making recommendations large and small that we believe would make a meaningful, positive difference in the lives of millions of student loan borrowers. Among our recommendations are better upfront information before borrowing, a simplified repayment system, helping borrowers pay off early rather than delay and encouraging borrowers to engage with their servicers. There are other common sense steps that could also help, including a courtesy credit bureau retraction program to help those who previously missed payments but have now gotten back on track and are looking to clear up their credit to, say, buy a home. Clearly there are opportunities make further enhancements to the federal student loan program, but effective reform must start with a clear and accurate understanding of the facts—facts on borrowing levels, facts on who struggles and why, and facts on proven solutions that make a difference. For example, a focus on borrowers with higher than average loan balances won’t help the most common borrower who defaulted —the individual who borrowed relatively little and defaulted after dropping out of school. Our recommendations are based on the data we see from 40 years of working with tens of millions of customers. We’re eager to roll up our sleeves to work with the Administration, with Congress, and others to make these improvements or other good ideas come to life. It’s time to get it done. About Navient Navient (Nasdaq:NAVI) is a Fortune 500 company that provides asset management and business processing solutions to education, healthcare, and government clients at the federal, state, and local levels. The company helps its clients and millions of Americans achieve financial success through services and support. Headquartered in Wilmington, Del., Navient employs team members in western New York, northeastern Pennsylvania, Indiana, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and other locations. Learn more at navient.com.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Construct-A-Lead, the industry’s most comprehensive construction lead service, announces the following student housing projects will go forward. Construct-A-Lead’s newly implemented advanced search feature allows the user to find their leads or key contacts by project type, location, bid stage, dollar value, company, or keyword. Users are able to track projects status, save searches, put personalized notes on projects, email a project to a colleague or customer, reach out directly to the decision maker and download construction leads with a one-touch feature. Interested parties are invited to visit Construct-A-Lead.com and sign up for a no obligation test drive, where they will be able to experience these newly integrated features. Users will be able to receive regular alerts on new and updated construction projects, in accordance with the individual’s preference. An example of the student housing projects available within the database is listed below. Reference the Project ID to utilize the new site features and to obtain direct contact information for each construction lead: San Francisco, CA – UCSF Student Housing - Plans call for the new construction of a student housing development to include 595 units across two buildings. Construction start: Q4, 2017, Q1, 2018, $222,000,000. Project ID: 1392345 New York, NY – 495 Eleventh Avenue – Plans call for the new construction of a 234 affordable unit mixed use tower with 200,000 square feet of office space, 80,000 square feet of student dormitories, a 12,000-square-foot supermarket. Construction start: Fall, 2019, $195,000,000 Project ID: 1392022 Gainesville, FL – University of Florida - Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity – Plans call for building a new fraternity house to the University of Florida totaling 16,800 square feet. Construction start: Q3, 2017 $3,500,000 Project ID: 1391922 Davenport, IA – Palmer College of Chiropractic Student Housing - Plans call for the demolition of the former St. Luke's Hospital and several adjacent homes and the new construction of a student housing development. Construction start: Q4, 2017, Q1, 2018. $20,000,000 Project ID: 1392481 Berea, OH – Main Street Revisited – Plans call for the new construction of a four-story mixed-use building to include retail on the ground floor and a total of 81 units capable of housing 131 students above it. Project will serve students at Baldwin Wallace University. Construction start: Q4, 2017, Q1, 2018, $17,000,000. Project ID: 1392524 Construct-A-Lead is an online database that connects users to large-scale commercial construction projects, including those hidden, private project leads. The service features hotel construction, office buildings, retail construction, medical facilities, school renovations and much more, to help bid on construction including those hard-to-find private project leads, from planning stage through completion. Construct-A-Lead’s daily updates of commercial construction project leads are an ideal solution for those who want to put their product or service into commercial, government and religious structures. For more information, visit Construct-A-Lead.com online or call 855-874-1491.


Injectable and nasal spray formulations of naloxone, which can be used to block the potentially fatal effects of opioid overdoses, are shown at an outpatient pharmacy at the University of Washington. (Photo: Ted S. Warren/AP) As the U.S. government and health care providers grapple with the exploding rates of opioid abuse across the country, the Clinton Foundation has expanded its partnership with Adapt Pharma, maker of Narcan nasal spray, by donating 40,000 doses of the opioid overdose reversal drug to colleges and universities throughout the United States. Narcan, a brand of the generic drug naloxone, is used for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose. “We know that most overdose deaths don’t happen in hospitals, which is why we’re working with Adapt Pharma, the American School Nurses Association, and a number of other partners to make FDA-approved naloxone Narcan nasal spray available in high schools, colleges and universities, and other community centers where people already are,” said Alex Chan, director of National Health for the Clinton Health Matters Initiative, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation. “President Bill Clinton has spoken about young men he knew who had suffered from accidental drug overdoses, and it prompted the Clinton Foundation to look closely at the issue of prescription drug misuse, and identify what we might be able to do,” Chan added. Hillary Clinton also expressed her passion for combating the crisis. During her presidential campaign last year, she laid out a detailed plan for tackling the epidemic, vowing to put $10 billion over 10 years toward a coalition she called the “Initiative to Combat America’s Deadly Epidemic of Drug and Alcohol Addiction.” It was an exhaustive plan in which, among many other details, Clinton promised to require better training and monitoring for opioid prescriptions, improve barriers to care to create more preventive efforts and treatment programs, reform the criminal justice system to avoid putting drug users in prison, and offer easier access to naloxone for first responders. Among the universities receiving naloxone from the new partnership are 53 member schools in the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Ohio. Ohio is a state with one of the highest rates of death due to prescription and illicit overdoses in the country. “This initiative further equips colleges and universities to take a proactive approach to the growing opioid epidemic,” Robert Helmer, president of Ohio’s Baldwin Wallace University, said in a statement. Patented in 1961 and approved by the FDA in 1971, naloxone is not addictive and is most commonly administered intravenously, though a more user-friendly nasal spray is now available. Some have called naloxone the “Lazarus drug,” because it can feel like the person administering it is raising someone from the dead. As the opioid addiction crisis has exploded throughout the U.S., experts across the country have been working to make naloxone more readily available to the public — members of law enforcement, firefighters, first responders, departments of health, local school districts, colleges, community-based organizations, and homeless shelters. “No area of this country is safe from this epidemic,” said Jennifer Plumb, MD, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah and founder of Utah Naloxone. While the FDA technically requires a prescription for the drug, the majority of U.S. states now allow a person to purchase naloxone from a pharmacist without one. Over the past year, CVS and Walgreens — among other pharmacy chains — have also expanded over-the-counter availability of the ocerdose reversal drug. Some critics worry that naloxone is a Band-Aid for a complex problem, calling the drug’s accessibility an excuse for opioid users to continue consuming it. But most experts, while trying to get a handle on the crisis, praise the expanded efforts, especially on the heels of a CDC review that found heroin-related overdose deaths have more than quadrupled since 2010. “Unless people are alive, they can’t recover,” said Thom Duddy, communications director of Adapt Pharma. Opioids — prescription medications and street drugs such as heroin — now are the leading cause of accidental death in the U.S. They killed more than 33,000 people in 2015, more than any year on record, according to the CDC. About half of the deaths involved prescription opioids. That number surpasses HIV/AIDS deaths in 1995, at the peak of the AIDS epidemic. While the U.S. makes up about 5 percent of the global population, it consumes more than 80 percent of the opioids in the world.

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