Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital

İstanbul, Turkey

Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital

İstanbul, Turkey

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Hatipoglu S.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Sevketoglu E.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Gedikbasi A.,Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Training And Research Hospital | Yilmaz A.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Pediatric Nephrology | Year: 2011

The matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL) are shown to increase in an inflammatory situation. Based on our previous reports that NGAL can be detected in the urine of children with urinary tract infection (UTI), we also asked whether MMP-9/NGAL complex could be detected in the urine of children with UTI. This multicenter, prospective study was conducted between October 2009 and October 2010. Seventy-one patients with symptomatic culture proven UTI, 37 asymptomatic children with contaminated urine and 37 healthy children were recruited. Mean uMMP- 9/NGAL/Cr levels were significantly higher in the UTI group than in the control group (p<0.0001). According to ROC analysis, the optimal cut-off level was 0.08 ng/mg to predict UTI. Using a cut-off value, sensitivity and specificity were 98.6 and 97.3%, respectively. The mean levels of uMMP-9/NGAL/cr in the UTI group were also significantly higher than those in the contamination group (p<0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference between contamination group and the control group (p=0.21). The mean uMMP-9/NGAL/Cr in the UTI group were significantly higher before treatment than after treatment (p<0.0001). The area under the curve was 0.997 (SE: 0.002, 95% CI: 0.993 to 1.001) for uMMP-9/NGAL/Cr. Urinary MMP-9/NGAL/Cr level was also correlated with positive urine nitrite test, positive urine leukocyte esterase reaction and renal scarring (p=0.0001, p=0.0001, p=0.04, respectively) whereas was not correlated to leukocytosis and positive CRP level in serum. Urine MMP-9/NGAL/cr can be used as a diagnostic biomarker for UTI in children. Identification of NGAL-MMP-9/cr levels in the urine of suspected UTI patients may also be useful to differentiate between contamination and infection and for monitoring of treatment response in children. © IPNA 2011.


Yilmaz A.,Istanbul University | Gedikbasi A.,Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Training And Research Hospital | Sevketoglu E.,Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Training And Research Hospital | Karyagar S.,Trabzon Numune Training and Research Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Clinical Nephrology | Year: 2012

Aims: Endothelin-1 (ET-1) contributes to renal fibrogenesis in several manners such as increasing collagen synthesis in mesangium, decreasing extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation by mesangial cells and stimulating mesangial contraction. The aim of our study was to investigate whether urine level of ET-1 (uET-1) could represent a useful biomarker of renal scarring and if so, to determine the optimal cut-off level for uET-1 to predict a renal scar. Methods: 44 children with renal scarring and 32 children without renal scarring were enrolled in the study. Urine ET-1 was measured by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay. Results: Mean uET-1 level was significantly higher in the scar group than in controls (2.75 ± 1.35 fmol/ ml vs. 0.68 ± 0.41 fmol/ml, p = 0.001). The optimal cut-off level was 1.064 fmol/ml for uET-1 to predict renal scarring. Using this cut-off point, sensitivity and specificity were 97.73% and 93.91%, respectively. AUC was found 0.975 (95% CI 0.917 - 0.996) for uET-1. Mean urine Endothelin-1/Creatinine ratio (uET-1/Cr) was also significantly higher in the scar group than in the control group (4.04 ± 2.29 fmol/mg Cr vs. 1.09 ± 0.67 fmol/mg Cr, p = 0.0001). Using 1.67 fmol/mgCr as optimal cut-off level, sensitivity and specificity were 95.45% and 84.09%, respectively. AUC was 0.945 (95% CI 0.875 - 0.982) for uET-1/Cr. Conclusion: Our study suggests that both uET-1 and uET-1/Cr can be used for prediction of renal scarring in children with normal renal function. Measuring urine level of ET-1 can help us to avoid unnecessary DMSA studies if the patient's uET-1 level is found to be under the determined cut-off point. © 2012 Dustri-Verlag Dr. K. Feistle.


Sahin G.,Dr Sami Ulus Childrens Hospital | Palanduz A.,Istanbul University | Aydogan G.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Cassar O.,Institute Pasteur Paris | And 16 more authors.
Pediatrics | Year: 2010

Infection by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) in childhood is common in the Mediterranean basin; however, classic Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is exceedingly rare in children not infected with HIV and not receiving immunosuppression, with only 30 cases having been reported since 1960. We recently reported 2 children with autosomal and X-linked recessive primary immunodeficiencies underlying KS in a context of multiple clinical manifestations. These reports suggested that classic KS in otherwise healthy children might also result from inborn errors of immunity more specific to HHV-8. In this article, we describe 3 unrelated Turkish children with classic KS born to first-cousin parents. The first patient, a girl, developed KS at 2 years of age with disseminated cutaneous and mucosal lesions. The clinical course progressed rapidly, and the patient died within 3 months despite treatment with vincristine. The other 2 children developed a milder form of KS at the age of 9 years, with multiple cutaneous lesions. A boy treated with interferon α therapy for 12 months is now in full remission at the age of 14, 2 years after treatment. The second girl is currently stabilized with etoposide, which was begun 4 months ago. None of the 3 children had any relevant familial history or other clinical features. The occurrence of classic KS in 3 unrelated Turkish children, each born to consanguineous parents, strongly suggests that autosomal recessive predisposition may drive the rare occurrence of HHV-8 - associated classic KS in children. Copyright © 2010 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.


Sevketoglu E.,Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Training And Research Hospital | Yilmaz A.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Gedikbasi A.,Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Training And Research Hospital | Karyagar S.,Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Pediatric Nephrology | Year: 2010

Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays an essential pathophysiological role in inflammatory reactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical utility of urine MIF (uMIF) level in predicting urinary tract infections (UTI). This multicenter, prospective study was conducted over a 1-year period between March 2008 and March 2009. Sixty patients with symptomatic culture-proven UTI and 29 healthy children were recruited. Urine MIF was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean MIF level was found to be significantly higher in the UTI group than in the control group (1082.82 vs. 211.45 pg/ml, p=0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that the optimal cut-off uMIF level was 295 pg/ml for uMIF to predict UTI. The sensitivity and specificity of this cut-off level were 91.7% and 69%, respectively. Mean uMIF/creatinine (Cr) was also significantly higher in the UTI group than in the control group (2400.69 vs. 267.56 pg/mgCr, p=0.0001). At a cut-off of 815 pg/mgCr for uMIF/Cr, the sensitivity and specificity were 95 and 79%, respectively. The area under curve (AUC) was 0.848 (standard error 0.040, 95% confidence interval 0.756-0.915) for uMIF and 0.889 (0.034, 0.805-0.946) for uMIF/Cr. Urine MIF/Cr was significantly higher in the patients with a positive leukocyte esterase reaction in the urine (p=0.047), leukocytosis (p=0.0001) and positive Creactive protein level in serum (p=0.003). The uMIF level was not related to leukocytosis, positive CRP level in serum and leukocyte esterase reaction in the urine. Neither uMIF nor uMIF/Cr were correlated to the positive urine nitrite test, pyuria, urine pH and specific gravity (p>0.05). These results suggest that urine MIF and uMIF/Cr can be used for the early prediction of UTI in children. © IPNA 2009.


Kizilca O.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Siraneci R.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Yilmaz A.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Yilmaz A.,Istanbul University | And 4 more authors.
Pediatrics International | Year: 2012

Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate the risk factors of antimicrobial resistance in children with urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria. Methods: A total of 344 patients diagnosed with urinary tract infection (UTI) between January 2008 and December 2009 were enrolled in this retrospective study. Causative microorganisms were ESBL-producing bacteria in 148 patients and non-ESBL-producing bacteria in 196 patients. There was no difference between the two groups regarding distribution of age, sex and length of follow up. Results: The most frequent causative agent was Escherichia coli, of which 41.4% were ESBL producing. Among Klebsiella species, 53.2% were ESBL producing. The proportion of ESBL-producing bacteria that were resistant to antibiotics was 83.1% for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, 18.2% for nitrofurantoin, 47.3% for quinolones, and 39.9% for aminoglycosides. For non-ESBL-producing bacteria, the resistance rate was 62.2% for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, 4.6% for nitrofurantoin, 9.7% for quinolones, and 9.7% for aminoglycosides. Age <1 year, high UTI recurrence rate, long duration of prophylaxis, use of cephalosporins for prophylaxis, hospitalization within the previous 3 months and clean intermittent catheterization were found to be significant risk factors for ESBL-producing bacteria (P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis identified age <1 year and high recurrence UTI rate to be independent risk factors, increasing the risk 1.74-fold and 2.25-fold, respectively. Conclusions: Recognition of the risk factors for ESBL-producing bacteria may be helpful to determine new policies in the management of UTI. Recurrence of UTI should be prevented especially in the first year of life, and prophylactic cephalosporins should be avoided. © 2012 The Authors.


Akin L.,Erciyes University | Adal E.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | AliAkin M.,Erciyes University | Kurtoglu S.,Erciyes University
Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism | Year: 2012

Rett syndrome (RS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder mainly affecting girls. It is characterized by a normal prenatal and perinatal period, apparently normal development for the first 6 months of life, and then a decelaration in head growth, loss of hand and communication skills, psycho motor retardation, as well as the development of sterotyped hand movement and truncal or gait apraxia. It has been shown to be related to mutations in the MECP2 gene located on Xq28. Diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 may be associated with certain genetic disorders such as Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, and Klinefelter syndrome. In this work, we report the case of a 9-year-old girl with RS who developed DM at the age of 6. To our knowledge, our patient is the third case reported to date of DM associated with Rett syndrome. © 2012 by Walter de Gruyter.


Hatipoglu N.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Somer A.,Istanbul University | Badur S.,Istanbul University | Unuvar E.,Istanbul University | And 6 more authors.
Turkish Journal of Pediatrics | Year: 2011

This study was performed to investigate the viral etiological agents, age distribution and clinical manifestations of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in hospitalized children. The viral etiology and clinical findings in 147 children (1 month to 5 years of age) hospitalized with acute LRTI were evaluated. Cell culture was used for isolation of influenza viruses and direct fluorescent antibody assay for parainfluenza viruses (PIVs), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenoviruses (ADVs). Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was employed for human metapneumovirus (hMPV). One hundred and six of all patients (72.1%) were male, and 116 children (79.8%) were ≤2 years. A viral etiology was detected in 54 patients (36.7%). RSV was the most frequently isolated (30 patients, 55.6%), and PIV (27.8%), hMPV (13%), influenza-A (9.3%), and ADV (5.6%) were also shown. Dual infection was detected in six patients. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (with isolated virus or no known viral etiology) with respect to symptoms, clinical findings, laboratory work-up, or radiological data. Length of hospital stay was also not different. Determination of the etiology of acute LRTI in children less than 5 years of age seems impossible without performing virological work-up, whether viral or nonviral in origin.


Turel O.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Sanli K.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Hatipoglu N.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | Aydogmus C.,Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Turkish Journal of Pediatrics | Year: 2010

The involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) in brucellosis is rare and has a broad range of presentations. Subacute and chronic meningoencephalitis are described as the most common neurologic manifestations. We report a six-year-old boy with culture-proven neurobrucellosis who presented with an acute picture of meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed pleocytosis with slight elevation of protein. The agglutination test titer was elevated in serum and Brucella spp. were isolated from both blood and CSF. He was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole plus rifampin and streptomycin. His clinical and laboratory features improved with specific antibiotic therapy and no sequela was observed in the short-term followup. Due to protean clinical features, unfamiliarity with the disease can delay the diagnosis in children who are not occupationally exposed. In endemic areas, neurobrucellosis should be considered in the evaluation of patients with unexplained neurologic symptoms.


PubMed | Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Pediatrics international : official journal of the Japan Pediatric Society | Year: 2013

The aim of the present study was to investigate the risk factors of antimicrobial resistance in children with urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria.A total of 344 patients diagnosed with urinary tract infection (UTI) between January 2008 and December 2009 were enrolled in this retrospective study. Causative microorganisms were ESBL-producing bacteria in 148 patients and non-ESBL-producing bacteria in 196 patients. There was no difference between the two groups regarding distribution of age, sex and length of follow up.The most frequent causative agent was Escherichia coli, of which 41.4% were ESBL producing. Among Klebsiella species, 53.2% were ESBL producing. The proportion of ESBL-producing bacteria that were resistant to antibiotics was 83.1% for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, 18.2% for nitrofurantoin, 47.3% for quinolones, and 39.9% for aminoglycosides. For non-ESBL-producing bacteria, the resistance rate was 62.2% for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, 4.6% for nitrofurantoin, 9.7% for quinolones, and 9.7% for aminoglycosides. Age <1 year, high UTI recurrence rate, long duration of prophylaxis, use of cephalosporins for prophylaxis, hospitalization within the previous 3 months and clean intermittent catheterization were found to be significant risk factors for ESBL-producing bacteria (P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis identified age <1 year and high recurrence UTI rate to be independent risk factors, increasing the risk 1.74-fold and 2.25-fold, respectively.Recognition of the risk factors for ESBL-producing bacteria may be helpful to determine new policies in the management of UTI. Recurrence of UTI should be prevented especially in the first year of life, and prophylactic cephalosporins should be avoided.


PubMed | Bakirkoy Maternity and Childrens Hospital
Type: Case Reports | Journal: The Turkish journal of pediatrics | Year: 2010

The involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) in brucellosis is rare and has a broad range of presentations. Subacute and chronic meningoencephalitis are described as the most common neurologic manifestations. We report a six-year-old boy with culture-proven neurobrucellosis who presented with an acute picture of meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed pleocytosis with slight elevation of protein. The agglutination test titer was elevated in serum and Brucella spp. were isolated from both blood and CSF. He was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole plus rifampin and streptomycin. His clinical and laboratory features improved with specific antibiotic therapy and no sequela was observed in the short-term follow-up. Due to protean clinical features, unfamiliarity with the disease can delay the diagnosis in children who are not occupationally exposed. In endemic areas, neurobrucellosis should be considered in the evaluation of patients with unexplained neurologic symptoms.

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