Bajaura Center

Pālampur, India

Bajaura Center

Pālampur, India
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Prasanna B.M.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Mazumdar S.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Mazumdar S.,Project Directorate on Farming System Research | Chakraborti M.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | And 7 more authors.
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2011

Micronutrient enrichment in the major staple food crops is an important breeding goal in view of the extensive problem of 'hidden hunger' caused by micronutrient malnutrition. Kernel iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) concentrations were evaluated in a set of 30 diverse maize genotypes during rainy (kharif) season of 2006, 2007 and 2008. The ranges of kernel Fe and Zn concentrations were 11.28-60.11 mg/kg and 15.14-52.95 mg/kg, respectively, across the three years. Based on the performance of the entries across the years, four highly promising inbreds and three landrace accessions were identified as highly promising for kernel Fe concentration, including a HarvestPlus line, HP2 (42.21 mg/kg). Similarly, for kernel Zn concentration, three inbreds and one landrace were identified as highly promising, including V340 (43.33 mg/kg). No significant association was found between kernel Fe and Zn concentrations indicating the need for independent selection for enhancing the concentration for these traits. Stability analysis revealed significant role of environment and genotype × environment (G × E) interaction in determining the levels of kernel Fe and Zn. The study also identified HP2 and BAJIM 06-17 for kernel Fe concentration and IML467 for kernel Zn concentration as the most stable genotypes across the environments.


Chakraborti M.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Chakraborti M.,Indian Grassland And Fodder Research Institute | Prasanna B.M.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Prasanna B.M.,International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Plant Biochemistry and Biotechnology | Year: 2011

Development of micronutrient enriched staple foods is an important breeding goal in view of the extensive problem of 'hidden hunger' caused by micronutrient malnutrition. In the present study, kernel iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) concentrations were evaluated in a set of 31 diverse maize inbred lines in three trials at two locations - Delhi (Kharif 2007 & 2008) and Hyderabad (Rabi 2007-08). The ranges of kernel Fe and Zn concentrations were 13.95-39.31 mg/kg and 21.85-40.91 mg/kg, respectively, across the three environments. Pooled analysis revealed significant genotype × environment (G × E) interaction in the expression of both the micronutrient traits, although kernel Fe was found to be more sensitive to G × E as compared to kernel Zn. Seven inbred lines, viz., BAJIM-06-03, DQPM-6, CM212, BAJIM-06-12, DQPM-7, DQPM-2 and CM129, were found to be the most stable and promising inbred lines for kernel Zn concentration, while for kernel Fe concentration, no promising and stable genotypes could be identified. Analysis of molecular diversity in 24 selected inbred lines with phenotypic contrast for the two kernel micronutrient traits, using 50 SSR markers covering the maize genome, revealed high levels of polymorphisms (214 SSR alleles; mean PIC value = 0.62). The phenotypically contrasting and genetically diverse maize inbred lines identified in this study could be potentially utilized in further studies on QTL analysis of kernel micronutrient traits in maize, and the stable and most promising kernel micronutrient-rich maize genotypes provide a good foundation for developing micronutrient-enriched maize varieties suitable for the Indian context. © 2011 Society for Plant Biochemistry and Biotechnology.


Wasala S.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Wasala S.K.,Plant Genetic Resources Center | Guleria S.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Guleria S.K.,Bajaura Center | And 5 more authors.
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2013

The study pertains to multi-location phenotypic evaluation of a set of 48 landrace accessions of maize (Zea mays L.) in India. The geographical coordinates of the collection sites of these accessions were first mapped, followed by evaluation of yield performance and flowering behaviour at three locations (Almora, Bajaura and Hyderabad) during 2006-07. The study revealed considerable phenotypic diversity among the accessions for grain yield and its components, besides genotype x environment (G × E) interactions. Statistical analyses, including biplot analysis and cluster analysis, demonstrated significant genetic variability among the accessions. Biplot analysis also revealed the potential of some of the landraces to display both location-specific as well as broader adaptability across locations. The study was successful in identifying some highly promising accessions on the basis of their performance for various yield components and flowering behaviour. These include accessions collected from Himachal Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Jharkhand, Uttarakhand, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Haryana, Gujarat, Bihar, Orissa and West Bengal. Such accessions could be potentially utilized in developing broad-based gene pools for improving diverse agronomically important traits in maize.


Agrawal P.K.,Vivekananda Parvatiya Krishi Anusandhan Sansthan | Jaiswal S.K.,Vivekananda Parvatiya Krishi Anusandhan Sansthan | Prasanna B.M.,Vivekananda Parvatiya Krishi Anusandhan Sansthan | Prasanna B.M.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | And 7 more authors.
Indian Journal of Genetics and Plant Breeding | Year: 2012

Evaluation of kernel iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) of 67 diverse maize genotypes grown during 2006-08 indicated significant variation for both the micronutrients. Kernel Fe concentration during 2006 varied from 20.38-43.79 mg/ kg, whereas the same ranged from 23.23-54.29 mg/kg and 29.22-49.24 mg/kg, during 2007 and 2008, respectively. Kernel Zn varied from 15.06-29.88 mg/kg, 7.01-22.01 mg/ kg and 13.64-26.54 mg/kg, during 2006, 2007 and 2008, respectively. No correlation was observed between kernel Fe and Zn concentration in the selected set of maize genotypes. For Fe concentration, CM140 (43.79 mg/kg) was found to be the most promising genotype during 2006, with HP-3 (54.29 mg/kg) during 2007 and CM212 (49.24 mg/kg) during 2008 as the best genotype. In case of kernel Zn, BAJIM-06-6 (29.88 mg/kg), V336 (22.01 mg/kg) and BAJIM-06-10 (26.45 mg/kg) were identified to be the best genotype in 2006, 2007 and 2008, respectively. The study revealed significant genotypes × environment interaction for both kernel Fe and Zn concentration, of which kernel Fe was found to be affected more by the change of environmental conditions, while it was of less extent for kernel Zn.Taking into consideration of stability parameters V336,VQL5, CM139,VQL1, CM129, and V340 were observed to be stable and promising genotypes for kernel Fe concentration, while in case of kernel Zn, V336, BAJIM-06-10, V340, BAJIM-06-7, CM129, and VQL1 were identified as the stable genotypes.


Guleria S.K.,CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya | Guleria S.K.,Bajaura Center | Chahota R.K.,CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya | Kumar P.,CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya | And 8 more authors.
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2013

Analysis of genetic variability for kernel zinc (Zn) concentration was undertaken on 81 maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes, including 13 inbreds from CIMMYT-HarvestPlus, in this study. Kernel Zn concentration varied significantly with a range of 3.81 to 35.83 mg/kg across three years of evaluation (2006-2008). Among the genotypes evaluated during 2006, IML 289 showed highest kernel Zn concentration (35.83 mg/kg), followed by HP 12 (31.69 mg/kg), HP 35-6 (29.02 mg/kg), HP 1 (27.24 mg/kg) and IML 119 (25.77 mg/kg). During kharif 2007, nine genotypes recorded kernel Zn more than 25 mg/kg. Among the landrace accessions, IML 312 (30.30 mg/kg), IML 185 (28.56 mg/kg), IML 288 (26.34 mg/kg), IML 119 (25.88 mg/kg) and IML 390 (25.75 mg/kg) were found promising, while the inbreds BAJIM 06-5 (28.72 mg/kg), CM 145 (25.89 mg/kg), CM 127 (25.45 mg/kg) and BAJIM 06-12 (25.44 mg/kg) recorded kernel Zn concentration. Among the inbreds evaluated during 2008, BAJIM 06-1 (24.74 mg/kg) was identified as the best genotype, followed by V 336 (23.36 mg/kg), CM 145 (22.18 mg/kg), CM 140 (21.09 mg/kg), V 340 (20.56 mg/kg), V 348 (20.17 mg/kg) and BAJIM- 06-6 (20.02 mg/kg). The study revealed significant genotype × year interaction for kernel Zn concentration. Stability analysis revealed that variances due to genotype, year + genotype × year, year (linear) and pooled deviation were significant. Taking into consideration of regression coefficient and deviation from linearity, V 336, VQL 1, V 334 and CM 139 could be identified as stable genotypes for kernel Zn concentration across the years.

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