Baglan Innovation Center

Baglan, United Kingdom

Baglan Innovation Center

Baglan, United Kingdom
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Glover C.F.,Baglan Innovation Center | Williams G.,University of Swansea
Journal of the Electrochemical Society | Year: 2017

Phenylphosphonic acid (H2PP) is investigated as a corrosion inhibitor of hot dip galvanized steel (HDG) fully immersed in a 5% (w/v) sodium chloride electrolyte. An in-situ Scanning Vibrating Electrode Technique (SVET) is used where concentrations of H2PP are systematically added to the electrolyte in neutral conditions. H2PP, at a concentration of 5 × 10−2 mol dm−3, is shown to effectively inhibit localized corrosion over a 24 h period with 96% efficiency. H2PP is compared with a sodium phosphate (Na3PO4) inhibitor at the same concentration over a wide pH range © The Author(s) 2017. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.


Glover C.F.,Baglan Innovation Center | Subramanian R.,Baglan Innovation Center | Williams G.,University of Swansea
Journal of the Electrochemical Society | Year: 2015

In-coating phenyl phosphonic acid (H2PP) additions are investigated as inhibitors of corrosion-driven organic coating disbondment on hot-dip galvanized (HDG) steel surfaces. In-situ scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) experiments under atmospheric corrosion conditions are used to study the influence of the quantity of dissolved H2PP in the organic coating on the kinetics of delamination. It is demonstrated that increasing levels of in-coating H2PP progressively lengthen the time for organic coating delamination to become established. Once underfilm corrosion becomes initiated, rates of cathodic disbondment are significantly slowed by H2PP additions in comparison with the uninhibited case. From the observed delamination kinetics, an inhibition mechanism is proposed whereby H2PP additions interact with the underlying zinc to form an interfacial salt layer which blocks underfilm oxygen reduction. The contribution of other possible modes of inhibition, such as H2PP release from the coating into the external defect electrolyte and a buffering of underfilm pH, are also discussed. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by ECS.


Glover C.F.,Baglan Innovation Center | McGettrick J.,Baglan Innovation Center | Williams G.,University of Swansea | Watson T.M.,University of Swansea | Bryant D.,Imperial College London
Journal of the Electrochemical Society | Year: 2015

The study of conducting polymers (CPs) is of high current interest due to their wide application in a range of optical and electronic devices. Poly (3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene)-Poly(Styrene Sulfonate) (PEDOT: PSS) is considered one of the most electrochemically and thermally stable CPs currently available. In many applications there is a requirement for electrical contact to be made between an organic PEDOT: PSS layer and a metallic substrate. In order to gauge the long term stability of the metal-CP interface, an understanding of the interaction between the CP and various metals is of high importance. An in-situ scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) has been employed to measure the Volta potential differences of PEDOT: PSS-coated metals of interest in opto-electronic device manufacture, including Ni, Cu, Ag and Pt, with noble metals for comparison, to identify instances where a reaction is taking place at the interface. A redox potential of ca. -0.15 V vs. SHE has been shown where PEDOT: PSS is present in both oxidized and reduced form on the metal surfaces. © The Author(s) 2015.


Glover C.F.,Baglan innovation Center | Williams G.,University of Swansea
Progress in Organic Coatings | Year: 2016

In-coating phenyl phosphonic acid (H2PP) additions are investigated as inhibitors of corrosion-driven organic coating disbondment and anodic filiform corrosion (FFC) on iron surfaces. In-situ scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) experiments under atmospheric corrosion conditions are used to study the influence of the quantity of dissolved H2PP in the organic coating on the kinetics of cathodic delamination. It is demonstrated that, in a standard delamination investigation, increasing levels of H2PP progressively decrease the delamination rate up to 55%. In-coating H2PP additions are shown to be much more effective in a realistic scenario where electrolyte additions are made to a scribed defect and rates of cathodic disbondment are slowed by up to 99%. From the observed delamination kinetics, an inhibition mechanism is proposed whereby H2PP additions interact with the underlying iron to form an interfacial salt layer that blocks underfilm oxygen reduction. In terms of FFC inhibition, a threshold has been established whereby, with additions of 10% or below H2PP is shown to enhance the filament propagation rate due Cl- attack via an insufficient blocking layer. However, above 10% H2PP additions, propagation is slowed by up to 76%. © 2016.

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