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Brkic S.,University of Novi Sad | Bogdanovic G.,Oncology Institute of Vojvodina | Vuckovic-Dekic Lj.,Serbian Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia | Gavrilovic D.,Serbian Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia | Kezic I.,ID Statsol Statistical Consultants
Journal of B.U.ON. | Year: 2012

Purpose: Plagiarism is the most common form of scientific fraud. It is agreed that the best preventive measure is education of young scientists on basic principles of responsible conduct of research and writing. The purpose of this article was to contribute to the students' knowledge and adoption of the rules of scientific writing. Methods: A 45 min lecture was delivered to 98 attendees during 3 courses on science ethics. Before and after the course the attendees fulfilled an especially designed questionnaire with 13 questions, specifically related to the definition and various types of plagiarism and self-plagiarism. Results: Although considering themselves as insufficiently educated in science ethics, the majority of the attendees responded correctly to almost all questions even before the course, with percentages of correct responses to the specific question varying from 45.9-85.7%. After completion of the course, these percentages were significantly (p<0.01) higher, ranging from 66.3-98.8%. The percentage of improvement of the knowledge about plagiarism ranged from 9.18-42.86%. The percentage of impairment ranged from 1.02-16.33%, the latter being related to the question on correct citing unpublished materials of other people; only for this question the percentage of impairment (16.33%) was greater than the percentage of improvement (11.22%). Conclusion: Even a short lecture focused on plagiarism contributed to the students 'awareness that there are many forms of plagiarism, and that plagiarism is a serious violation of science ethics. This result confirms the largely accepted opinion that education is the best means in preventing plagiarism. © 2012 Zerbinis Medical Publications. Source


Vuckovic-Dekic L.,Serbian Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia | Gavrilovic D.,Serbian Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia | Kezic I.,ID Statsol Statistical Consultants | Bogdanovic G.,Oncology Institute of Vojvodina | Brkic S.,University of Novi Sad
Journal of B.U.ON. | Year: 2011

Purpose: To assess the knowledge of basic principles of responsible conduct of research and attitude toward the violations of good scientific practice among graduate biomedical students. Methods: A total of 361 subjects entered the study. The study group consisted mainly of graduate students of Medicine (85%), and other biomedical sciences (15%). Most participants were on PhD training or on postdoctoral training. A specially designed anonymous voluntary multiple-choice questionnaire was distributed to them. The questionnaire consisted of 43 questions divided in 7 parts, each aimed to assess the participants' previous knowledge and attitudes toward ethical principles of science and the main types of scientific fraud, falsification, fabrication of data, plagiarism, and false authorship. Results: Although they considered themselves as insufficiently educated on science ethics, almost all participants recognized all types of scientific fraud, qualified these issues as highly unethical, and expressed strong negative attitude toward them. Despite that, only about half of the participants thought that superiors-violators of high ethical standards of science deserve severe punishment, and even fewer declared that they would whistle blow. These percentages were much greater in cases when the students had personally been plagiarized. Conclusion: Our participants recognized all types of scientific fraud as violation of ethical standards of science, expressed strong negative attitude against fraud, and believed that they would never commit fraud, thus indicating their own high moral sense. However, the unwillingness to whistle blow and to punish adequately the violators might be characterized as opportunistic behavior. © 2011 Zerbinis Medical Publications. Source

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