Azusa, CA, United States
Azusa, CA, United States

Azusa Pacific University is a private, inter-denominational, evangelical Christian university located near Los Angeles in suburban Azusa, California, USA. With over 6,500 students, APU's undergraduate student body is the largest in the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities and the second largest evangelical undergraduate student body in the United States. APU holds regional accreditation by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges .The university was founded in 1899, with classes opening on March 3, 1900 in Whittier, California. It began offering degrees in 1939. While officially inter-denominational, APU has ties with several evangelical denominations. The university's seminary, the Graduate School of Theology, holds to a Wesleyan-Arminian doctrinal theology. Wikipedia.


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News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Voalte, the leader in healthcare communication technology, today announced the hiring of Cheryl McKay, PhD, RN, as the company’s Chief Nursing Officer. Dr. McKay joins Voalte from Orion Health, where she was Chief Nursing Officer responsible for developing, implementing and evaluating care coordination models to achieve high-quality results in a cost-effective manner. “Cheryl brings to Voalte 20 years of experience as an international expert on care team coordination and healthcare communication,” said Adam McMullin, Voalte Chairman and CEO. “Her broad practice experience and passion for improving the way care teams collaborate makes her a perfect fit for Voalte. She will be responsible for clinical strategy and engaging our customers’ clinical teams to ensure our solutions help them achieve the best possible clinical outcomes.” Dr. McKay completed a Research Doctorate in Nursing at University of Texas, with an emphasis on care coordination and collaboration in healthcare. Dr. McKay has authored and presented research for national and international audiences, and holds a Master’s degree in Nursing from Azusa Pacific University and a Bachelor’s degree in Nursing Science from Mount St. Mary’s University. “I am excited to join the leadership team at Voalte,” said Dr. McKay. “We have a powerful solution, with Voalte Platform ranked the No. 1 Secure Communications Platform by KLAS, a vibrant company culture, and a dedication to improving clinical workflow, quality of patient care and staff engagement. I look forward to working closely with our customers and sharing with them my clinical experience and evidence-based practices in collaboration and care coordination.” About Voalte Voalte develops smartphone solutions that simplify caregiver communication. Ranked number-one and named 2017 Category Leader in the Best in KLAS: Software & Services report for the Secure Communications Platform segment, Voalte is the only company to offer a comprehensive Mobile Communication Strategy that enables care teams inside and outside the hospital to access and exchange information securely. Founded in 2008, Voalte is a privately held company based in Sarasota, Florida. Voalte solutions are now available to more than 132,000 caregivers throughout the United States. For more information, visit voalte.com or follow @Voalte on Twitter.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Western University of Health Sciences has selected Mary Lopez, PhD, RN, as the College of Graduate Nursing’s (CGN) second dean. Lopez has served as CGN’s interim dean since Founding Dean Karen Hanford, EdD, MSN, FNP, retired from the position in April 2016. Lopez said she is thrilled and humbled to serve as dean. “Nursing has become more complex in ways that couldn’t have been imagined a generation ago. Now there’s an imperative to be not just a warm caregiver, and an excellent clinician, but a great innovator too,” she said. “The demands of health care are calling for a new generation of thinkers and leaders who want to be agents of care innovation on interprofessional teams. That’s why nursing education has such a crucial role to play. “Health care will change as our new president of the United States takes office. Being able to lead an excellent team of faculty and staff as the dean of CGN is an opportunity to make an innovative difference in the lives of students, patients, the community, and our national health care environment.” Lopez guided pre-licensure and masters students at Azusa Pacific University for several years before joining CGN in 2009. She was director of the MSN-E program from 2010 to 2014, and led a team of educators to raise Nursing Board (NCLEX) rates to 100 percent, revise curriculum to include QSEN competencies, and establish the first RN Transition to Practice Program in Southern California. She previously served as CGN’s Associate Dean of Research and Administration and Director of the RN to MSN Program. She established the Community of Scholars at the College of Graduate Nursing, and works as a Nurse Scientist with staff nurses, physicians, physical therapists, and dietitians at a local health care system to improve patient outcomes through designing and implementing evidence-based practice projects. Her research interests include interprofessional education, RN transition to practice, and cancer survivors. Lopez earned her PhD at Azusa Pacific University, Master of Science in Nursing at California State University, Los Angeles, Bachelor of Science in Nursing at California State University, Fullerton, and Associate Degree in Nursing at Pasadena City College. Her clinical background includes critical care, oncology, and administration. “Dr. Lopez brings to the position the experience of serving as the Director of Nursing at two different hospitals and an understanding of the role of nursing education in meeting regional needs for advancing the profession and the quality of care in the community,” said WesternU Provost and Chief Operating Officer Gary M. Gugelchuk, PhD. “Since her arrival at WesternU several years ago, Dr. Mary Lopez has demonstrated thoughtful, innovative leadership within our College of Graduate Nursing programs and throughout the University,” said Daniel R. Wilson, MD, PhD, president of Western University of Health Sciences. “The College is at the vanguard of graduate nursing education, an accomplishment due in no small part to Mary’s efforts. We are fortunate to have found such a capable successor to the founding dean already at WesternU and poised for further progress.”


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The City of Azusa, in partnership with Silverado Sierra Vista Memory Care Community, signed a resolution several weeks ago to become a Dementia Friendly City, the first in Los Angeles County. The resolution, signed by Mayor Joseph Rocha states, “The City will work with the Dementia Friendly Community task force to create a community that addresses the needs of individuals living with dementia as well as their caregivers.” According to the Alzheimer’s Association, the number of California residents with Alzheimer's disease will double by 2030, a figure that does not account for people affected by other types of dementia. Already, 1.1 million Californian’s care for a loved one with dementia today, and nearly 60% of people caring for a person with dementia rate the stress as high or very high due to the physical and emotional toll. The city’s resolution aims to address the issue. Ed Blomendahl, Senior Community Ambassador at Silverado, assembled a task force of community leaders earlier this year to set a vision for a Dementia Friendly Azusa. Silverado is a Southern California-based dementia care provider that was founded 20 years ago with a vision to change the way the world cares for and perceives people with memory-impairing conditions. The company will continue to support the task force by providing education programs, expert guidance and training resources. “We are delighted that the City of Azusa has recognized the need to bring more awareness to dementia,” shares Blomendahl. “The mission of the task force is to create a Dementia Friendly Azusa by educating the community, instilling respect for people living with memory impairing conditions, and to foster an environment that works to eliminate the stigma often associated with such conditions.” Mayor Rocha adds, “Individuals affected by memory-impairing conditions include our friends, our families and our neighbors, and the people of Azusa have an opportunity to address it first hand. As I have spoken with Azusa residents, many expressed a need to address this challenge. In fact, the day after we passed the resolution, many more individuals reached out in support.” With the resolution passed, approved and adopted, one of the first items on the task force’s agenda is to plan a citywide education event. Other efforts include a window cling for businesses that complete Dementia 101 training at silveradolearning.com, Virtual Dementia Tour events during which the public is invited to step into the shoes of someone with memory impairment, and first responder participation in a dementia-training program – compliments of Silverado. “Silverado is committed to becoming an active part of the communities we serve, and partnering with the City of Azusa to create a dementia friendly community is a part of that commitment,” says Silverado Chairman and CEO Loren Shook. “When we founded Silverado 20 years ago, we set out to do more than provide the best quality of life possible for people affected by memory impairing diseases – we set out to change the world in how people with dementia are treated. This effort is another step toward that mission, providing a model for other cities to follow.” The Dementia Friendly Azusa task force, which meets regularly at Silverado, is in the process of reviewing as many as a dozen additional action items in support of the effort. The task force is represented by the following groups: local government, fire and police departments, chamber of commerce, healthcare providers, educational organizations – led by Azusa Pacific University, nonprofits, the faith-based community, and local citizens. In addition, several local businesses have already stepped up to support the initiative. Triad Gym, Marie Calendars, Massage Envy, Grocery Store Outlet and Mexican food eatery, Max’s already have plans to provide employee education and even make changes to their operation. Businesses, individuals and organizations interested in getting involved can share their contact information with the task force, here: silveradocare.com/DementiaFriendlyAzusa. About Silverado Silverado was founded in 1996 with the goal of enriching the lives of those with memory loss by changing how the world cares for people with cognitive decline. Establishing this mindset as the foundation allows Silverado to operate in a way that provides clients, residents and patients with utmost dignity, freedom, respect and quality of life. Silverado has grown to become a nationally recognized provider of home care, memory care assisted living and hospice services. With 49 locations, the company delivers world-class care across seven states, including Arizona, California, Illinois, Texas, Washington, Utah and Wisconsin. Learn more at silveradocare.com or call (866) 522-8125.


AZUSA, CA--(Marketwired - Feb 28, 2017) -  Final opportunities to own in two of Rosedale's most luxurious neighborhoods are going quickly, and potential buyers are urged to visit this award-winning master-planned community in Azusa today. The two highly sought after collections built by Brookfield Residential are nearly sold out with two homes remaining at Camellia and merely a handful left at Aster Heights. The last Camellia homes include two superbly crafted single-family residences showcasing timeless architectural style, expansive two-story interiors and desirable indoor-outdoor living spaces. The first is the Residence Two model, a breathtaking home that's designed for entertaining with open living spaces that include a sleekly appointed gourmet kitchen with island; a large great room and dining area; and a spectacular outdoor room with open-air kitchen. A charming first-floor guest suite is a welcome feature for visitors, while the tranquil library offers a private retreat for work or reflection. The upstairs is also impressively planned with a versatile bonus room, two well-sized secondary bedrooms; and an elegant master bedroom suite with a walk-in closet and spacious covered deck. This home is priced at $1,480,000. The second and final Camellia offering is the gorgeous Residence Three model, an exquisitely designed five-bedroom home priced at $1,680,000. After stepping through the outdoor courtyard, a dramatic entry foyer leads to open-concept living spaces with a grand great room for entertaining; a gourmet kitchen with oversized, eat-in island; a formal dining room; a convenient first-floor guest suite with an attached sitting room; and a three-car tandem garage. The upper level is equally imposing with its enormous master bedroom suite with walk-in closet; three comfortable secondary bedrooms with walk-in closets; a versatile bonus room; and a covered deck off both the master bedroom and bedroom three. This coveted residence is brimming with the finest appointments, and includes a large outdoor room and swimming pool. The last of Aster Heights spectacular two-story single-family designs are set on pool-sized homesites with the added allure of a location atop Rosedale's highest point. The voluminous floorplans are defined by elegance with sweeping living spaces that include a chef-caliber kitchen with large eat-in island and walk-in pantry; an enormous great room and formal dining room; a second-floor bonus room or library; dual master suites per plan; and a three-car attached garage with storage. Appealing options are available to enrich the designs, such as an outdoor room with optional kitchen or entertainment center; a high heat kitchen and butler's pantry; a fireplace at the dining room and more. Prices start from the mid $1 millions. Both collections offer the advantages of Rosedale's incomparable lifestyle, where residents have year-round access to family friendly parks, scenic trails, resort-style amenities and much more. Homebuyers are encouraged to act quickly on these limited luxury opportunities and visit the neighborhood sales galleries without delay. To explore Rosedale's other beautiful neighborhood offerings, tour the available model homes or go to www.LiveRosedale.com for more information. "Camellia and Aster Heights are two of Rosedale's most exquisite home collections and buyers are finding the designs surpass every expectation of luxury," said Mercedes Meserve, Vice President of Marketing for Rosedale Land Partners, LLC. "The last remaining homes are selling extremely quickly and we encourage any interested buyers to act without delay." Rosedale features three distinctive neighborhood offerings, including Brookfield Residential's Camellia featuring single-family designs ranging from approximately 3,607 to 4,134 square feet with four to six bedrooms, up to six and one-half baths and three-car garages plus storage. Aster Heights by Brookfield Residential offers sweeping floorplans spanning from approximately 4,652 to 4,925 square feet with five to seven bedrooms, four and one-half to seven and one-half baths and three-car garages. Coming soon is TRI Pointe Homes' Bradford, which will showcase spacious floorplans ranging from approximately 3,413 to 3,972 square feet. Interiors will include four to five bedrooms plus loft, four and one-half to five and one-half baths and three-car tandem garages. Prices are anticipated to start from the mid $800,000s. Located in the tranquil foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains, Rosedale rises above it all, connecting residents to the best of nature through scenic trails, permanently preserved hillsides and extraordinary resort-style amenities. The social hub of the community is The Resort, a 4,500 square-foot private clubhouse and two-acre recreation center with a private state-of-the-art fitness center, Junior Olympic swimming pool and children's wading pool, an open-turf play area, turf volleyball, picnic tables and benches and more. The central arroyo, which features 13.5 acres of open space winding throughout the community, offers a vibrant setting for hiking, biking and walking. One-of-a-kind community parks complement the Rosedale lifestyle, providing unlimited opportunities for picnics, play dates and pick-up ball games. Set within close proximity of the I-10 and 210 corridors, residents have easy access to downtown Los Angeles, as well as Orange and San Bernardino counties, while the Metro Gold Line Station conveniently transports commuters from Rosedale to Pasadena. The prime location also puts popular retail, dining and entertainment destinations conveniently nearby, such as Old Town Pasadena, Westfield Santa Anita Fashion Square, Westfield West Covina, Home Depot, Target, Trader Joe's and Costco. Azusa Pacific University and Citrus Community College are also within a short walk of the community. To visit the master-planned community of Rosedale, exit the 210 Freeway at Citrus Ave and head north towards the mountains. Turn left on Foothill Boulevard, right on Palm Drive, left on The Promenade and follow the signs to the neighborhoods. To learn more about Rosedale's luxury home opportunities, register your interest at www.LiveRosedale.com. About Rosedale Land Partners - Ownership and development management of the 518-acre master-planned community of Rosedale in the city of Azusa, CA is a new partnership between Brookfield Residential, Christopher Development Group (CDG) and Starwood Capital Group. As Rosedale Land Partners, these companies bring together the necessary depth of large-scale community planning, development and financing experience required for the successful implementation of community-based master planning and development.


News Article | December 2, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

— The most recent report released by EDsmart ranks the fastest online degree programs at the associates, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate degree-levels. A total of 20 online degree programs were ranked by the duration and cost of program. Data was gathered from each schools’ website. Along with rankings, EDsmart includes pertinent information about each ranked school’s accelerated online program offerings. For the associates degree, Azusa Pacific University leads with a 12-month, $24,000 Associates of Art in Health Sciences. For the bachelor’s degree, Mercy College offers a 12-month, $89,760 Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management. For the Master’s degree, Trine University offers a 12-month, $14,000 Master of Science with a major in Criminal Justice program. At the Doctorate degree-level, Breyer State University offers a 12-month, $3,500 Doctoral Degree in Grief Counseling. In ranking order, here are fastest accelerated online degree programs for the 2016-2017 academic year: 1. Trine University 2. Southern New Hampshire University 3. University of North Texas 4. University of Miami 5. Ball State University 1. Breyer State University 2. University of Florida 3. University of Arkansas 4. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 5. University of Southern California *See the full rankings here According to Tyson Stevens, managing editor for EDsmart, “If a student is ambitious and wants to speed up the process of obtaining a degree, there are now programs that can fulfill that need.” He concludes, “Not only are these programs fast, they are very affordable and can be completed from the comfort of one’s own home if wanted. I wouldn’t be surprised if more schools follow suit in the near future.” EDsmart reviews publicly available data to produce independent ranking assessments of various educational programs, in addition to student guides and resources. The site is regularly updated by a committed team of writers and researchers, who produce college rankings and resources that will help prospective and current college students make informed decisions. For more information, please visit http://www.edsmart.org/


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Diane Bonner’s new book “Why Bullies Are Cowards”: is an important manuscript exploring the issues of peer bullying and behavior management programs. Diane was born and spent most of her young childhood on a small farm in Northern Iowa before moving to Southern California. She earned a bachelor’s of science degree and standard elementary and secondary teaching credentials at California Polytechnic University, Pomona, California, and a Special Education Learning Handicap Teaching Credential at Azusa Pacific University in Azusa, California. Diane began her teaching career working for the Los Angeles County Office of Education, Camps and Schools as a substitute and Youth Service Center teacher at MacLaren Hall Children’s Center School, a facility for pre-court, preplacement minors where she was required to learn and utilize the authoritative style of discipline with battered, abused, and neglected students. She spent the last fourteen years of her career teaching handicapped students’ remedial reading and math at the intermediate school level. During that time, she also worked as a district-wide literacy coordinator, creating a reading intervention program for the Charter Oak Unified School District. Ms. Bonner has been in numerous leadership roles in school communities achieving success as an advocate, innovator, and consultant. She has won numerous awards which include the San Gabriel Valley Woman’s Club Reading Teacher of the Year. She authored “Edukashunal Phood Phor Thaut,” and The ReVISIONist newsletters, providing insight into enhancing student academic performance. Diane Bonner has dedicated her career to address and resolve the educational challenges of children. Her programs and writings have been featured in both the Los Angeles Times and the San Gabriel Valley Tribune. Published by New York City-based Page Publishing, Diane Bonner’s timely manuscript considers the differing discipline styles while teaching the reader how to implement the most effective of these styles for classroom management coupled with the ideal learning environment for the students. Research shows there are three styles of discipline, passive discipline or ignoring a child’s transgressions and assigning no consequences, authoritarian discipline or utilizing corporal punishment such as hitting or spanking to reinforce that a child should stop a transgression and not do it again, and authoritative discipline which requires that the disciplinarian explain to the child why he or she should stop a negative behavior and replace it with positive one. Research has also shown that of the three styles of discipline only the authoritative style promotes learning and understanding as it provides reasons why a child needs to stop a negative behavior and replace it with a positive one. Drawing on her twenty-five years of experience as a special education teacher, this educator mastered the authoritative style of disciplining her students and was able to motivate them to change their lives by teaching them the following: -The difference between a person’s personal and public space. -How to protect and defend one’s personal space. -What constitutes a “community”. How unified “like thinkers” can form an anti- bullying community. -The strength and power in numbers. -How an anti-bullying community provides a safe place for all. -The difference between snitching and telling. Why a student who snitches is a rat and a student who tells is a hero. -Why those who prey on others who are weaker, smaller, or less able to protect and defend themselves makes them a coward. As bullying statistics continue to escalate, author Diane Bonner says “it’s now time to ask all parents and public school teachers, have you been taught or are you willing to learn how to discipline authoritatively so you can help teach your child or your students how to stop being a bullying victim, perpetrator or bystander?” Readers who wish to experience this thought-provoking work can purchase “Why Bullies Are Cowards” at bookstores everywhere, or online at the Apple iTunes store, Amazon, Google Play or Barnes and Noble. For additional information or media inquiries, contact Page Publishing at 866-315-2708. Page Publishing is a traditional New York based full-service publishing house that handles all of the intricacies involved in publishing its authors’ books, including distribution in the world’s largest retail outlets and royalty generation. Page Publishing knows that authors need to be free to create - not bogged down with complicated business issues like eBook conversion, establishing wholesale accounts, insurance, shipping, taxes and the like. Its roster of authors can leave behind these tedious, complex and time consuming issues, and focus on their passion: writing and creating. Learn more at http://www.pagepublishing.com.


Barzi A.,University of Southern California | Lenz A.M.,University of Southern California | Labonte M.J.,Azusa Pacific University | Lenz H.-J.,University of Southern California
Clinical Cancer Research | Year: 2013

Worldwide, colorectal cancer has a higher incidence rate in men than in women, suggesting a protective role for sex hormones in the development of the disease. Preclinical data support a role for estrogen and its receptors in the initiation and progression of colorectal cancer and establishes that protective effects of estrogen are exerted through ERβ. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women as well as consumption of soy reduces the incidence of colorectal cancer. In the Women's Health Initiative trial, use of HRT in postmenopausal women reduced the risk of colon cancer by 56% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.38-0.81; P = 0.003]. A recent meta-analysis showed that in women, consumption of soy reduced the risk of colon cancer by 21% (95% CI, 0.03-0.35; P = 0.026). In this review, using the preclinical data, we translate the findings in the clinical trials and observational studies to define the role of estrogen in the prevention of colorectal cancer. We hypothesize that sometime during the tumorigenesis process ERb expression in colonocytes is lost and the estrogen ligand, HRT, or soy products, exerts its effects through preventing this loss. Thus, in the adenoma-to-carcinoma continuum, timing of HRT is a significant determinant of the observed benefit from this intervention. We further argue that the protective effects of estrogen are limited to certain molecular subtypes. Successful development of estrogen modulators for prevention of colorectal cancer depends on identification of susceptible colorectal cancer population(s). Thus, research to better understand the estrogen pathway is fundamental for clinical delivery of these agents. © 2013 American Association for Cancer Research.


News Article | September 14, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

"My only anxiety," a young Vincent van Gogh wrote in desperation, "is how can I be of use in the world?" From the despair of a failed missionary outpost, he was pleading for direction from his older brother Theo, the person he always went to with his problems. Once again at his wit's end and on the verge of failure, Van Gogh was struggling to make sense of his life. Vincent's parents, along with just about everyone else in his life, were wondering when he was going to make something of himself. He may have been wondering that, too. And here was Theo, writing back and enclosing some money—bailing him out once again. What happened next changed the history of art. The young Van Gogh didn't quit. Starting with drawing, then moving to painting, Vincent dedicated the next decade of his life to art. From roughly this point forward, he pushed forward at an incredible pace, averaging at least a painting a day, churning out thousands of artworks—a lifetime's worth of achievements in a fraction of the time. And he did it with the support of his brother. Contrary to popular belief, Vincent van Gogh did sell more than a single painting in his lifetime. He just sold most of them to Theo, his de facto patron. Their partnership made the spread of Vincent's work possible. Sure, Theo was his brother, but, more important, he was a well-connected art dealer who believed in a promising painter. One thing many of us tend to forget today is that we don't often get a Vincent van Gogh without a Theo van Gogh. It was Theo who prompted Vincent to move to Paris and introduced him to a group of misfit painters called "Impressionists." And it was Theo who supported his brother's work when no one else understood it, along with Theo's wife Johanna, who would champion it long after both Van Gogh brothers were dead and gone. We all want to believe that if our work is good enough, we'll be recognized for our creative genius. Whether as artists, entrepreneurs, or employees, we believe success is mostly a meritocracy. It isn't. Who you know matters, and without the right connections, even the best work won't get noticed. But this isn't just about the importance of networking—it goes straight to the heart of the creative process. We're often led to believe that creative minds toil alone in a cabin in the woods or stuffed away in some laboratory, too busy to be bothered. "You might wonder," creativity expert Keith Sawyer wrote in his book Group Genius, "Isn’t the individual mind the ultimate source of creativity? Doesn’t each creative spark come from a single person?" Not exactly, says Sawyer. Creativity is always the result of collaboration, whether it's intentional or not. In my study of successful creatives today, I've identified three kinds of collaboration that every creative person needs in order for their work to succeed and influence others. Where we live and do our work matters. We understand intuitively that some places have greater concentrations of a certain kind of person than others. A huge number of musicians move to my hometown, Nashville, every year in hopes of making it big in the music industry. Same goes for actors moving to Hollywood and artists relocating to Brooklyn. The work of urban studies theorist Richard Florida underscores this phenomenon. "The most important factor in the success of your career," he tells me, "is where you decide to live." According to Florida, who has indexed the most creative cities in America and regularly measures where the "creative classes" call home, not all places are created equal. Each locale has a personality that can be instrumental in the success or failure of a person's work; you need to find the right fit for what you do. Certain scenes can be hotbeds for certain kinds of creative output, as Silicon Valley is for computer programmers or 1850s Paris was for visual artists. The scenes we join (or fail to) unavoidably affect the success of our work. And sometimes the best career move is to physically move. Go someplace where something's happening that relates to your creative passion, even if you do that on a small scale at first—like by attending a conference or even just moving across the room to engage in a scene that's already taking place. Everyone needs a network, and creatives are no exception to this rule. In fact, the "it's who you know" rule seems to apply even more so to artists. Since art—or any creative craft, really—is inherently subjective, the opinions of a handful of important people can be hugely important. "You really only need one or two good friends," New York–based artist Hank Willis Thomas told me, "because it's really about having someone who's going to advocate for you. That’s the formula for success." What is a network, exactly, and how is building one different from joining a scene? A network is a little bit looser and more relational—it's an informal group of people who come together for the purpose of connecting with each other. Networks tend to stretch beyond the borders of a given scene; members may not all know one another personally, but they're each influential to the success of the network itself. Networks don't just happen, though. You often have to look for them, making use of the people already around you, and constantly curating your relationships in hopes of strengthening the network. Success doesn't take an army, but it does take a small group of people who can help your work get the attention it deserves. This isn't about getting your big break, though; it's just about being good enough to make it and knowing the right people who can help you get there. Every thriving artist understands the power of networks, whereas every starving artist continues to try and make it on their own. "There was a group of them, 19 men, and they got together once or twice a week for about 17 years. And in those meetings there was a special kind of magic that happened," Diana Glyer, author and English professor at Azusa Pacific University, explained to me recently. Glyer is an expert on the literary group known as the Inklings, which included C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and others. "They read their works-in-progress to one another, and they stayed up late into the night giving each other critiques," Glyer says. "And it is in this forge of friendship and engagement that some of the great works that we love were created"—including The Chronicles of Narnia and The Lord of the Rings. These works, Glyer has found, didn't result from any single act of genius, but rather creative collaboration—and of a very specific kind. The Inklings got together to collaborate intentionally, spurring each other on and even challenging one another to do better. We all need groups of people not just to connect with, but with whom we can share our work—people Glyer calls "resonators," those who affirm when you're on the right track and guide you back when you're not. This type of collaborative interaction is arguably the hardest to secure. It's more deliberate and tighter-knit than either a scene or a network, but it's no less crucial. And we often build creative communities out of people we meet in those other two. Without a community, our best work will stay stuck inside us. We need peer groups and circles of influence to make our work better. This is true in art, but it's also true in business. Any work that requires you to make something the world hasn't seen before is work that often has to be done collaboratively. This is ultimately good news. If you have a powerful idea, you aren't solely on the hook for pulling it off all by yourself. If you're feeling stuck, it may be that your creativity simply needs fuel and support from your relationships. It might be time to stop trying to force the creative process and instead start going out there and interacting with people—locating the right scene, growing your network, and building a community. When you're hitting a wall creatively, ask yourself: This is how great creative work gets made—not in isolation, but through everyday collaboration. It was true for Vincent van Gogh, and it's true for us today. Jeff Goins is a writer who lives in Nashville, Tennessee, with his family. He is the author of the national best seller The Art of Work: A Proven Path to Discovering What You Were Meant to Do. Follow him on Twitter at @JeffGoins.

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