Pietra Ligure, Italy
Pietra Ligure, Italy

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Murialdo R.,S Martino Hospital | Bertolotti F.,S Paolo Hospital | Pastorino G.,S Paolo Hospital | Mencoboni M.,Villa Scassi Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology | Year: 2011

Purpose: Bi-weekly gemcitabine (G) in combination with docetaxel (D) is an effective treatment for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) previously treated with adjuvant/neoadjuvant anthracyclines containing regimens with a good toxicity profile. In the present phase II study, we investigated the activity of the same regimen as first-line treatment. Methods: Women with breast cancer pretreated in adjuvant/neoadjuvant setting with anthracyclines received bi-weekly G (1,250 mg/m2 days 1, 15) and D (50 mg/m2 days 1, 15) every 28 days with restaging after 3 and 6 cycles. Results: Overall 42 patients were enrolled. Median age is 48 years (range, 31-71 years). Eight patients (19%) achieved complete responses, 18 (43%) partial responses for an overall response rate (ORR) of 62%; five patients (12%) obtained stable disease (SD), and 8 (19%) patients had progressive disease (PD). After a median 17-month follow-up, the median time to disease progression was 12 months (95% CI, 3-26 months) and the median survival time was 27 months (95% CI, 4-57 months). No grade 4 toxicity was seen except in one patient who developed a grade 4 neutropenia. Grade 3 toxicities were leukopenia (2%), neutropenia (14%), anemia (2%), nausea and vomiting (2%), diarrhea (2%), asthenia (2%), and skin toxicity (12%). Conclusion: The GD bi-weekly regimen is well tolerated and active as first line in anthracyclines-pretreated women with MBC. It appears as an interesting alternative compared to a 3-week schedule whenever hematological toxicity is the main clinical concern. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Schiavetta A.,Azienda Ospedaliera Santa Corona | Maione C.,The Second University of Naples | Botti C.,The Second University of Naples | Marino G.,Azienda Ospedaliera Santa Corona | And 8 more authors.
Stem Cells Translational Medicine | Year: 2012

Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is a vascular disease affecting lower limbs, which is going to become a demanding challenge because of the aging of the population. Despite advances in endovascular therapies, CLI is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Patients without direct revascularization options have the worst outcomes. To date, 25%-40% of CLI patients are not candidates for surgical or endovascular approaches, ultimately facing the possibility of a major amputation. This study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of autologous bone marrow (BM) transplantation performed in "no-option" patients, in terms of restoring blood perfusion by collateral flow and limb salvage. A multicenter, prospective, not-controlled phase II study for no-option CLI patients was performed. Patients were subjected to intra-arterial infusion of autologous bone marrow and followed for 12 months after the treatment. Variation of blood perfusion parameters, evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry or transcutaneous oximetry, was set as the primary endpoint at 12 months after treatment and amputation-free survival as the secondary endpoint. Sixty patients were enrolled and treated with BM transplantation, showing improvement in objective and subjective measures of perfusion. Furthermore, survival analysis demonstrated improved amputation-free survival rates (75.2%) at 12 months after the treatment. This study provides further evidence that autologous bone marrow transplantation is well tolerated by CLI patients without adverse effects, demonstrating trends toward improvement in perfusion and reduced amputation rate, confirming the feasibility and safety of the procedure. © AlphaMed Press.

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