AWWA Government Affairs Office

Washington, DC, United States

AWWA Government Affairs Office

Washington, DC, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Roth D.K.,Washington Technology | Roberson J.A.,AWWA Government Affairs Office | Cornwell D.A.,Environmental Engineering and Technology
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2012

The US Environmental Protection Agency has made regulating contaminants as a group (as opposed to one compound at a time) a part of its new drinking water strategy and has identified carcinogenic volatile organic chemicals (cVOCs) as the first group to be regulated. This article summarizes the potential commonalities for a cVOC rule such as health effects, co-occurrence, analytical methods, and/or treatment or control processes. The authors detail the physical and chemical characteristics as well as the uses of both the currently regulated VOCs and the unregulated VOCs that could potentially be included in a future cVOC rule. © 2012 American Water Works Association.


Rice J.,Duke University | Via S.H.,AWWA Government Affairs Office | Westerhoff P.,Arizona State University
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2015

A recently developed watershed-scale hydraulic model (De-facto Reuse Incidence in our Nation's Consumptive Supply [DRINCS]) was applied to estimate municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) contribution to downstream water treatment plant (WTP) influent flow. Using DRINCS and geocoded data for 14,651 WWTPs and 1,320 WTPs, the occurrence of treated municipal wastewater in drinking water supplies is geographically widespread, and its magnitude depends largely on the flow condition and size of the source river. Under average streamflow conditions in this study, the median contribution of wastewater flow to drinking water supplies was approximately 1% and increased to as much as 100% under low-flow conditions (modeled by Q95). Wastewater contributions to nutrient and emerging contaminant loading were estimated and geospatially compared with the findings of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule and Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule. In turn, this analysis offers important insights into the treatment challenges facing treatment facilities across the United States. © 2015 American Water Works Association.


Roberson J.A.,AWWA in WashingtonDC | Carpenter A.T.,AWWA Government Affairs Office
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2015

AWWA has developed a few timely products to assist utilities with their challenges in test?ing for and responding to cyanotoxins. A Water Utility Manager's Guide to Cyanotoxins was developed jointly by AWWA and the Water Research Foundation and published in 2015. This guide is a primer that utilities can use to better understand the basics of cyanobacteria and cya?notoxins, as well as to help identify resources to explore in greater depth. Additionally, AWWA has partnered with a talented project team to develop and deploy a cyanotoxins oxidation calculator and is working on additional tools. USEPA has a standard method for microcystins using a mass spectrometry process (LC/MS/MS) that has been proved both effective and accurate at measuring several variants of microcystins. Instead of recommending a standard method process, USEPA has encouraged the use of a laboratory method that has not been through its own standard method process, and therefore it is not clear whether it meets USEPA's own standards for accuracy, reproducibility, and other aspects of its quality as a laboratory test for water systems. AWWA has requested that USEPA classify the recommendations document as an ?economically significant guidance document.


Ishii S.K.L.,University of Florida | Boyer T.H.,Environmental Engineering and Technology Inc. | Cornwell D.A.,Environmental Engineering and Technology Inc. | Via S.H.,AWWA Government Affairs Office
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2015

This work is motivated by technical advancements related to direct potable reuse (DPR) and the importance of public values when considering alternative water resources. This study involved the distribution of an online survey to residents in four US cities about existing tap water supplies and "purified water," defined as "municipal wastewater that has undergone advanced water treatment processes, thus resulting in water quality that, at a minimum, complies with drinking water regulations." Overall, 50-60% of respondents were in support of using purified water as potable water. Contaminant concerns were highest for taste/smell and microbial contaminants in both current tap water and purified water. Survey results highlight the importance of addressing certain areas when communicating about DPR to the public, such as barriers against microbial contamination, the trustworthiness of utilities, potential improvements over the status quo, and community-specific drivers that necessitate the use of purified water in a given setting. © 2015 American Water Works Association.


Eaton A.,Eurofins | Chowdhury Z.,Arcadis | Shaw J.,Arcadis | Roberson J.A.,AWWA Government Affairs Office
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2012

As part of its drinking water strategy, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) attempts to streamline the cost of compliance by regulating contaminants as groups with similar health effects, co-occurrence, common analytical method(s), and common treatment or control processes. When the announcement to regulate up to 16 carcinogenic volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) as a group included compounds not currently listed in the USEPA analytical methods most commonly used for VOC analysis (methods 524.2 and 524.3), a review of the state of the science of analytical methods was performed. Findings indicated that USEPA method 524.3 can support lower-level detection of currently regulated VOCs as well as some additional VOCs included in the cVOC group, but a modified sample preservation protocol for (method 524.3) and additional methods (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and method 526) will be needed to detect all compounds in the proposed cVOC group at meaningful levels. The number of analytical methods required for the cVOC group will significantly affect the feasibility and analytical cost of compliance monitoring for the cVOC rule if the list remains as proposed. © 2012 American Water Works Association.


Roth D.K.,Washington Technology | Cornwell D.A.,Environmental Engineering and Technology Inc. | Carpenter A.T.,AWWA Government Affairs Office
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2015

The US Environmental Protection Agency has identified carcinogenic volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) as the first group to be regulated as part of the agency's new strategy to regulate contaminants as a group. The structure of a cVOC group rule has not been published, but the US Environmental Protection Agency has identified two potential approaches: (1) establishing a group maximum contaminant level that is based on the sum of contaminant concentrations or (2) establishing a group maximum contaminant level that is based on the sum risk-weighted contaminant concentrations. Working from these two approaches, the AWWA cVOC Workgroup has developed six potential regulatory scenarios for a group cVOC rule. Case studies of two Long Island, N.Y., utilities were conducted using historical data from those utilities' existing packed tower aeration treatment systems. The performance of the existing packed tower aeration treatment systems when treating historical peak cVOC influent concentrations was modeled to determine compliance with the six potential regulatory scenarios. © 2015 American Water Works Association.


Eaton A.,MWH Laboratories | Cha Y.,MWH Laboratories | Geddes L.,MWH Laboratories | Morley K.M.,AWWA Government Affairs Office
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2011

A blind interlaboratory study of radium-226 (Ra-226), radium-228 (Ra-228), and gross alpha and beta activity was conducted among five multistate certified laboratories to examine concerns regarding analytical variability for compliance with the revised Radionuclides Rule. Results of the interlaboratory study demonstrated that although Ra-226 and gross beta measurements appeared to be both accurate and precise, even at low levels, Ra-228 and gross alpha measurements were much less robust both within and among laboratories, which could result in potentially incorrect compliance decisions. There are several steps that utilities can take to improve reliability of compliance data, including mandating specific quality control (QC) steps by laboratories and ensuring that they follow the QC guidance in the US Environmental Protection Agency's laboratory certification manual and the Multi-Agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols Manual, even though these may not always be enforced by laboratory certification authorities.


Roth D.K.,Washington Technology | Cornwell D.A.,Environmental Engineering and Technology Inc. | Carpenter A.T.,AWWA Government Affairs Office | Roberson J.A.,AWWA Government Affairs Office
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2015

The US Environmental Protection Agency has identified carcinogenic volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) as the first group to be regulated under its new strategy for addressing contaminants as groups. Should this potential regulation be promulgated, utilities that currently do not treat for VOCs may need to implement best available technologies (BATs) for removing cVOCs. Utilities that currently treat for VOCs may need to improve or add BATs to ensure adequate treatment under the potential regulation. This article presents decision trees to assist utilities in selecting BATs on the basis of their particular groundwater source. The researchers contacted manufacturers of selected BAT equipment such as low-profile aeration systems and granular activated carbon systems to obtain information on equipment footprints and costs for a range of flow rates and VOC removal rates. This information was used to project capital and operating costs as well as space requirements for those BATs. © 2015 American Water Works Association.

Loading AWWA Government Affairs Office collaborators
Loading AWWA Government Affairs Office collaborators