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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Frequency and severity of Harmful Algae Blooms (HABs) in the California-Nevada region have increased in recent years. These HABs affect plant operations and sometimes force temporary closures of water treatment plants due to severe taste and odor issues or cyanotoxins. Copper-based algaecides have been an important tool for many decades in management of source water. In some cases, copper has been over-used, leading to backlash. Doctor Hammond will discuss recent advances that have led to more efficient formulations of copper, which have superior performance and have less environmental impact. “Data from real world case studies will be presented, illustrating that a formulation of liquid copper yields superior results, superior pest control, and better cost-effectiveness at lower doses.” states Hammond. One such product, EarthTec, has been reported by municipalities to reduce taste and odor by directly removing or degrading the compounds responsible, such as geosmin. It delivers a low-dose of copper at only 60 Parts per billion. The use of advanced copper based products such as EarthTec QZ for the treatment and prevention of invasive quagga mussels (Dreissenids) will also be discussed by Dr. Hammond. Both products are approved by the EPA for control of in lakes and open waters. They are also approved for mussel control in pipelines and flowing waters. QZ is one of a select group of products that is both NSF-Certified for drinking water and EPA registered as a molluscicide. It has been in full-scale implementation at water treatment plants throughout the U.S. Data and case studies from some of these municipalities will be presented at the CA/NV AWWA conference in Anaheim, CA on April,11. David Hammond, Ph.D. is an environmental chemist with an interdisciplinary background in physical, biological and social sciences. As a scientific consultant, his clients have included Nike, IDEO, Amorim, agricultural producers, and the Green Chemistry Institute. Dr. Hammond has three patents for pest control agents and numerous peer-reviewed publications. He holds an M.S. from the Energy & Resources Group and a Ph.D. in Agricultural & Environmental Chemistry, both from the University of California, Berkeley, where he specialized in Chemical Ecology. He was honored with the Macy award for excellence in entomology. Dr. Hammond currently serves as Senior Scientist with Earth Science Laboratories, Inc. For more information visit EarthTecwatertreatment.com / EarthTecQZ.com or call (800) 257-9283. You can follow EarthTec on LinkedIn.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The American Water Works Association today celebrated news that 43 entities have expressed interest in loans through the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) and urged increased funding to confront the U.S. water infrastructure challenge. AWWA, the chief architect of the WIFIA program, continues to advocate for WIFIA and State Revolving Funds on Capitol Hill. At the 2017 Water Matters! Fly-In held in March, AWWA delegates met with over 400 Congressional offices, urging robust funding for FY18 for WIFIA and the Drinking Water and Clean Water SRFs. “With more than $2 trillion needed to repair and expand water and wastewater infrastructure in the coming years, water utilities needed a smart new finance tool to help communities pay for large, critical water projects,” said Tracy Mehan, AWWA Executive Director of Government Affairs. “Funding WIFIA is a tremendous step forward as we confront the nation’s water infrastructure challenge.” The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency solicited letters of interest for 2017 WIFIA loans beginning in January. EPA estimates the $20 million appropriated for WIFIA in its inaugural year will provide approximately $1 billion in credit assistance and finance over $2 billion in water infrastructure investment. “As a federal-local-private partnership, this program will help expand water infrastructure systems to meet the needs of growing communities,” EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said this week in announcing the interest in WIFIA loans. “This investment will empower states, municipalities, companies, and public-private partnerships to solve real environmental problems in our communities, like the need for clean and safe water.” WIFIA leverages federal dollars so that for every dollar Congress appropriates, $50 to $60 is expected to be loaned out. A proposed 2017 omnibus spending bill, which would keep the government funded through Sept. 30, includes an additional $10 million for WIFIA. Congress is considering the bill this week. “The overwhelming interest from utilities WIFIA loans suggests Congress should appropriate the maximum amount possible for the program,” Mehan said. “For example, adding $10 million in the 2017 budget more would provide $1.62 billion in credit assistance and finance more than $3 billion in water infrastructure investment.” Established in 1881, the American Water Works Association is the largest nonprofit, scientific and educational association dedicated to managing and treating water, the world’s most important resource. With approximately 50,000 members, AWWA provides solutions to improve public health, protect the environment, strengthen the economy and enhance our quality of life.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

(DENVER) – The American Water Works Association announced today that Olympic champion Amy Van Dyken and a panel of water industry leaders will speak at the association’s Annual Conference & Exposition (ACE17), to be held June 11-14 in Philadelphia. Three noteworthy leaders in the water industry will be part of a panel discussion at ACE17’s Opening General Session at 8:30 a.m. on Mon., June 12 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The panel will feature: The event will be sponsored by HomeServe, a leading provider of home repair service plans. Additionally, Amy Van Dyken will speak during ACE17’s Water Industry Luncheon at 12 p.m. on Tues., June 13 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Van Dyken is a six-time Olympic gold medalist in swimming, four of which she won at the 1996 Summer Olympics. In 2014, a severe all-terrain vehicle accident left her partially paralyzed. She will speak about her experience as a world-class athlete and the obstacles she has overcome throughout her career. The event will be sponsored by CDM Smith and Stantec. Visit ACE17’s webpage to view the conference program and to register. Standard registration rates end on May 31. Media note: Accredited members of the media may attend ACE17 at no charge. However, they are required to register with AWWA Public Affairs by May 31. For media registration, please visit the AWWA Press Room or contact Deirdre Mueller at dmueller(at)awwa.org or at 303-347-6140. Established in 1881, the American Water Works Association is the largest nonprofit, scientific and educational association dedicated to managing and treating water, the world’s most important resource. With approximately 50,000 members, AWWA provides solutions to improve public health, protect the environment, strengthen the economy and enhance our quality of life.


The Great Lakes Protection Fund and American Water Works Association are pleased to announce the finalists in the Water Utility Energy Challenge (WUEC), an innovative program which engages water operators in a competition to reduce the emissions sourced in their energy generation. The inaugural 2017-2018 competition, focused on the Great Lakes Basin, is aimed at connecting the utilities with new innovative software while fostering an awareness of the associated emissions, particularly mercury. The six finalist water utilities are: “We’re really excited with the breadth of the WUEC finalists. They were chosen from a broad field of applicants and these six utility leaders represent a wide range of communities, from Bayfield, Wisconsin, which serves fewer than 1,000 residents, to the Great Lakes Water Authority, which serves more than 4 million residents in 125 communities across southeast Michigan. The fact that there were both U.S. and Canadian finalists also illustrates that regardless of the operation’s scale or location, utilities can use the cleanest energy to deliver clean, safe drinking water to their customers,” said David LaFrance, AWWA CEO. “These finalists characterize the next generation of water utility who will reduce emissions while improving the financial health of their systems. We’re excited to see the geographic range of utilities across the entire Great Lakes Basin as well as a mix of water and combined water/wastewater systems. The competition is another step toward protecting and restoring the health of our shared Great Lakes waters,” said David Rankin, Vice President of Programs, GLPF. The competition will run through April 2018, with award and cash prizes presented later in the spring. More information on the challenge can be found by visiting www.AWWA.org/competition. The Water Utility Energy Challenge (WUEC) is a technology competition focused on water utilities in the Great Lakes Basin. Offering two top cash prizes of $20,000 and $10,000, the Water Utility Energy Challenge is supported by the Great Lakes Protection Fund. It is a collaborative effort of the American Water Works Association, CDM Smith, E2I, Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative, Growth Capital Network, and Wayne State University.  For more information, visit www.AWWA.org/competition Follow WUEC on Twitter                       Like WUEC on Facebook The Great Lakes Protection Fund (GLPF) is a private, nonprofit corporation formed in 1989 by the governors of the Great Lakes states. It is a permanent environmental endowment that supports collaborative actions to improve the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem. To date, the Fund has made 269 grants and program-related investments representing over $78 million to support the creative work of collaborative teams that test new ideas, take risks, and share what they learn. www.glpf.org Established in 1881, the American Water Works Association is the largest nonprofit, scientific and educational association dedicated to managing and treating water, the world’s most important resource. With approximately 50,000 members, AWWA provides solutions to improve public health, protect the environment, strengthen the economy and enhance our quality of life.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

As Drinking Water Week continues, the American Water Works Association and water professionals across North America are encouraging homeowners to check and fix leaks inside and outside the home. Consumers are encouraged to quickly and efficiently fix leaks in and around their homes to prevent water waste. To test for leaks inside, customers should shut off everything connected to water and inspect the home’s flow indicator on the water meter. If the indicator continues to move, even with everything off, there’s a leak somewhere in the home. To check for a leaky toilet, customers can place a few drops of food coloring in the holding tank and wait five minutes without flushing. There’s a leak if coloring appears in the bowl. Also, customers should check all faucets and under the sinks for dripping. To check for leaks outside, customers should inspect the lawn for wet spots or pools of water around spray heads. Brown or muddy spots would also indicate there is a leak in the irrigation system. “We are each personally responsible to conserve water in and around our home,” said AWWA Chief Executive Officer David LaFrance. “Checking for and fixing leaks is an easy way to do our part in preventing water waste.” More information on household leaks can be found on DrinkTap.org. About Drinking Water Week For more than 35 years, AWWA and its members have celebrated Drinking Water Week, a unique opportunity for both water professionals and the communities they serve to join together to recognize the vital role water plays in daily lives. Additional information about Drinking Water Week, including free materials for download and celebration ideas, is available on the Drinking Water Week webpage. Established in 1881, the American Water Works Association is the largest nonprofit, scientific and educational association dedicated to managing and treating water, the world’s most important resource. With approximately 50,000 members, AWWA provides solutions to improve public health, protect the environment, strengthen the economy and enhance our quality of life.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

As Drinking Water Week concludes, the American Water Works Association and water professionals across North America are advocating for investment in the repair and replacement of local water infrastructure. It’s critical that water infrastructure is maintained properly given that public health, economic vitality, fire protection and quality of life rely on it. However, much of the water infrastructure in North America needs to be repaired and replaced because of the length of time water pipes have been underground, some have been buried for 75 to 100 years. Per an AWWA report, repairing and replacing drinking water infrastructure will cost at least $1 trillion over the next 25 years. The potential costs of infrastructure replacement surpass what many water utilities can pay, which means utilities must work together with rate-payers, government officials and other stakeholders to invest in water systems. “Water infrastructure is crucial to our daily lives and to sustain our future generations,” said AWWA Chief Executive Officer David LaFrance. “It’s essential that our local water utility and government work in harmony with customers to cover the cost of repairing and replacing our water infrastructure.” More information about water infrastructure is available on DrinkTap.org. About Drinking Water Week For more than 35 years, AWWA and its members have celebrated Drinking Water Week – a unique opportunity for both water professionals and the communities they serve to join together to recognize the vital role water plays in daily lives. Additional information about Drinking Water Week, including free materials for download and celebration ideas, is available on the Drinking Water Week webpage. Established in 1881, the American Water Works Association is the largest nonprofit, scientific and educational association dedicated to managing and treating water, the world’s most important resource. With approximately 50,000 members, AWWA provides solutions to improve public health, protect the environment, strengthen the economy and enhance our quality of life.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

As Drinking Water Week continues, the American Water Works Association and water professionals across North America are encouraging households to identify and replace lead-based water pipes and plumbing. Lead presents health concerns for people of all ages, particularly pregnant women, infants and young children. In children, low exposure levels have been linked to learning disabilities, behavioral problems and other issues. Water leaving treatment plants and traveling through water mains is almost always lead-free. However, lead is sometimes present in pipes connecting older homes to the water system or in fixtures and home plumbing. A licensed plumber can help to identify lead service lines and other materials such as lead fittings and solder. Households can find out more about their water quality by having it tested by a certified laboratory. Information on other sources of lead contamination in homes is available from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. “Water utilities can adjust water chemistry to minimize the possibility of lead dissolving into tap water, but communities and households also play an important role in keeping drinking water safe,” said AWWA Chief Executive Officer David LaFrance. “Together, let’s get the lead out.” More information on lead in water can be found on DrinkTap.org. About Drinking Water Week For more than 35 years, AWWA and its members have celebrated Drinking Water Week, a unique opportunity for both water professionals and the communities they serve to join together to recognize the vital role water plays in daily lives. Additional information about Drinking Water Week, including free materials for download and celebration ideas, is available on the Drinking Water Week webpage. Established in 1881, the American Water Works Association is the largest nonprofit, scientific and educational association dedicated to managing and treating water, the world’s most important resource. With approximately 50,000 members, AWWA provides solutions to improve public health, protect the environment, strengthen the economy and enhance our quality of life.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

As Drinking Water Week continues, the American Water Works Association and water professionals across North America are encouraging householders to care for their homes’ pipes. Many things can unnecessarily clog a home’s plumbing system, including “flushable” wipes, and fats, oils and grease. Each year, these clog pipes, back up systems and harm the environment when they aren’t disposed of properly. Specifically, flushable wipes, facial tissue, paper towels and medications should be thrown away in the trash and should not be flushed down the toilet. Also, fats, oil and grease should not be dumped down the drain. Instead, they should also be thrown away in the trash. “Caring for our pipes should be considered maintenance around the home and not just thought of when something goes wrong with them,” said AWWA Chief Executive Officer David LaFrance. “We have to do our part not to clog up our already precarious water and wastewater systems.” More information on caring for pipes can be found on DrinkTap.org. About Drinking Water Week For more than 35 years, AWWA and its members have celebrated Drinking Water Week, a unique opportunity for both water professionals and the communities they serve to join together to recognize the vital role water plays in daily lives. Additional information about Drinking Water Week, including free materials for download and celebration ideas, is available on the Drinking Water Week webpage. Established in 1881, the American Water Works Association is the largest nonprofit, scientific and educational association dedicated to managing and treating water, the world’s most important resource. With approximately 50,000 members, AWWA provides solutions to improve public health, protect the environment, strengthen the economy and enhance our quality of life.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

VOORHEES, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--American Water (NYSE: AWK), the nation’s largest publicly traded water and wastewater utility company, today announced Lindsey Olson, operations superintendent with New Jersey American Water, will participate in Think Diversity on June 28 in Arlington, Va. Olson, who was recently recognized by Water & Wastes Digest Magazine as a “Top Young Professional,” will discuss what attracted her to the water industry and how the industry can draw in high-achieving talent. “As we see more of our tenured employees start to retire, there is a pressing need to recruit talent into the water industry to ensure the continued quality of our water,” said Melanie Kennedy, senior vice president of Human Resources. “Developing and promoting employees within our company is another great way to ensure succession of our talent; and Lindsey is a great example of how we do this.” Olson was recently promoted to her new role. She joined American Water 18 years ago and has worked on both rehabilitation and expansion of existing facilities, as well as greenfield design and construction of new treatment plants. She has developed particular expertise in groundwater treatment technologies, including iron and manganese filtration systems, organics and radionuclide adsorption processes, and other trace contaminant removal technologies. Olson has also taken on leadership positions in both the New Jersey section and national board of American Water Works Association (AWWA) and was a contributing author to AWWA’s M-65 Manual for Onsite Generation of Sodium Hypochlorite, all while earning her master’s degree in Environmental Engineering from Rutgers University, N.J. Scranton Gillette Communications’ Water & Wastes Digest and Roads & Bridges magazine is hosting the live conference as a continuation of their cooperative “Think Diversity” education program. The event will include how technology is driving a diverse workforce, and ways to implement succession planning. The program is an interactive format with presenters who are immersed in the infrastructure industry and have success stories to share on how they mastered diversity in their companies or municipalities. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly-traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,700 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com. Click here to subscribe to Mobile Alerts for American Water.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

With a $2 trillion water and wastewater infrastructure challenge facing America, the American Water Works Association today applauded Congress for appropriating an additional $10 million for the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA). The additional $10 million brings WIFIA funding in 2017 to $30 million, which can leverage an estimated $1.5 billion in federal loans. Because WIFIA can only fund 49 percent of a project’s cost, the loans may actually spur on approximately $3 billion in large water infrastructure projects. The additional funding was included in the federal omnibus spending bill approved by Congress late last week, which keeps the government funded through Sept. 30. President Trump signed the bill on Friday. “Our leaders in Congress deserve credit for recognizing the nation’s water infrastructure challenge and WIFIA’s power to tackle it,” said Tracy Mehan, AWWA Executive Director of Government Affairs. AWWA, the chief architect of the WIFIA program, last week cheered news that 43 entities have expressed interested in WIFIA loans in its first year of funding. Modeled after the successful Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act, WIFIA leverages federal dollars so that for every dollar Congress appropriates, 50 to 60 dollars are expected to be loaned out. In a special report issued on May 4, Fitch Ratings, a global leader in credit ratings and research, observed that “WIFIA may play an important role accelerating investment fostering capital access for small municipalities and encouraging the best solutions (public, private or both) to the country’s water infrastructure challenges.” "WIFIA-funded projects can potentially reduce the magnitude of increased costs to end users and temper the need to obtain rate increases related to capital," said Fitch Ratings Director Stacey Mawson. "WIFIA can also spur partnerships between the public and private sectors, creating a forum for eliciting innovative proposals and problem solving." Established in 1881, the American Water Works Association is the largest nonprofit, scientific and educational association dedicated to managing and treating water, the world’s most important resource. With approximately 50,000 members, AWWA provides solutions to improve public health, protect the environment, strengthen the economy and enhance our quality of life.

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