AWI
Germany
AWI
Germany

Time filter

Source Type

Short film 'Limitless' is the 34th short film to enter Art With Impact's mental health film collection Art With Impact (AWI) is excited to congratulate Rory McLeod for the film 'Limitless’ which is the April 2017 addition to AWI's OLIVE Film Collection. The film follows Zoe, a young woman who debates whether or not to attend her friend's party. We see the impact of her anxiety around social situations as she fears being perceived negatively, with the film providing insight into this internal dialogue in a relatable and impactful way. Filmmaker Rory McLeod grew up around wildlife in the desert of central Australia where he developed a passion for the environment and social justice. Originally hoping to be the next legendary David Attenborough and film wildlife, his passion for photography eventually evolved into creating a number of short films and in 2015 he started film school in Victoria. Says Rory: ‘I believe that most people experience some level of anxiety at any given time. One of the most common examples I can think of is when you’re with a group of people and you feel like everyone is watching your every movement. For some people it becomes crippling and so it becomes a situation to be avoided Art With Impact’s monthly film competition awards one winning filmmaker a $1,000 cash prize for a film — up to five minutes in length and of any genre — that uses mental health as the point of interest. Film topics may either be interpretive of mental health, or address it directly. Winning films are added to AWI’s diverse OLIVE Film Collection, which is used in educational outreach programs. Read all submission guidelines here and submit your own film!


Short film by 19-year-old filmmaker is the 35th short film to enter Art With Impact's mental health film collection Art With Impact (AWI) is excited to congratulate Sharon Nyarko for the film "Beyond Words," which is the May 2017 winner and 35th addition to AWI's OLIVE Film Collection. The film addresses depression and how often it is trivialized and downplayed, revealing the power that words have over actions people take and the impact of stigma on reaching out for support. Sharon Nyarko is a 19-year-old independent digital storyteller and second-year undergraduate Neuroscience specialist at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include brain function, biological basis of mental illness, and the development of more effective support schemes for people with mental health disorders. "Beyond Words" is Sharon's first publicized project as Director and Producer, born out of a passion to challenge the status quo of socio-cultural misconceptions about the scope, causes and effects of mental illness, and to generate relevant discussions and solutions. Sharon created the film to clear up misconceptions around depression that it is simply a transient emotion, stating that it is "beyond gender, culture, religion." Although she has made other films before, this is her first film about mental illness. We look forward to seeing more of the amazing work Sharon will create! Are you a filmmaker or mental health advocate with a passion for storytelling? Our film competition deadlines run monthly, and upcoming opportunities to submit are May 31, June 30 and July 31. All winning films receive a $1,000 cash prize. Learn more here.


In honor of Mental Health Awareness Month 2017, the #myMHmatters movement encourages people to cultivate wellness through the arts. Art With Impact (AWI) promotes mental wellness by creating space for young people to learn and connect through art and media.  Committed to a future where artists are revered as cultural icons of courage and change, enabling young people to communicate freely and fearlessly about their mental health, AWI creates spaces - online and in person - where individuals can communicate about mental health without the barriers created by stigma. For Mental Health Awareness Month and Mental Health Awareness Week which kick off today, May 1, Art With Impact is promoting wellness through an innovative #myMHmatters campaign. Every week day during the month of May Art With Impact will post a film from their groundbreaking OLIVE Film Collection along with an interview of a filmmaker, advocate or organization change-making in the field of the film theme for that day. There will also be questions to reflect on how the film and daily theme can relate to your own life, and provide a list of mental health resources and organizations to connect with. Because AWI is committed to creating a world where nobody feels isolated, ashamed, or hopeless when they experience mental illness, this is a great way to engage in mental wellness by learning new practices and gaining new knowledge. The campaign provides a fun to maintain wellness while reducing stigma, engaging in meaningful art, and learning about individuals and organizations doing great work. To engage with the campaign: watch the film of the day, engage with the questions, and AWI your thoughts in the blog comments, via Facebook comment, by tagging us or retweeting on Twitter, or commenting and tagging Instagram with the hashtag #MyMHMatters!


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.foodprocessing-technology.com

Ajinomoto Windsor to build new frozen appetisers plant in US Ajinomoto Windsor (AWI) has announced plans to invest $39m in the construction of a new plant in Joplin, near the Carthage Plant in Missouri, US, to increase production capacity for frozen appetisers. Construction has already started on the facility, which will have an annual production capacity of 25,000t. Production is scheduled to start in November. The company intends to use the investment to strengthen its frozen appetisers production system and enhance its frozen foods business in North America. Ajinomoto will introduce new development and production technologies in the frozen appetiser category, as well as provide sufficient space for new plants at the AWI site to cater to future demands. In addition to the new plant, AWI has closed an agreement to transfer ownership of its existing Piedmont facility next to Today’s Food, a manufacturer of frozen and refrigerated food products. AWI noted that the food service sector plays an important role and accounts for approximately 30% of its sales, while frozen appetisers category consitutes roughly 30% of its sales. Ajinomoto will introduce new development and production technologies in the frozen appetiser category, as well as provide sufficient space for new plants at the AWI site to cater to future demands. According to the company, the market for frozen appetisers for food service has increased by 5% over the last two years. During that period, AWI’s frozen appetiser sales have increased approximately 6% a year. The two other production facilities of the company are already close to reaching their maximum production capacity.


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Aleyant, an innovative leader in providing robust software services to the graphic communications industry at value-driven prices, today announced that Terri Wymore has assumed a new role as Product Manager for Aleyant Pressero™ and eDocBuilder™. Wymore joined Aleyant in 2009 as an Account Executive. She has served as Vice President of Client Services and Support for the past four years. Prior to joining Aleyant, Wymore held several management-level jobs in the graphic arts industry and operated her own graphic design firm. “Terri is a valuable member of the Aleyant team and has contributed a great deal to our success in all of her previous roles,” said Greg Salzman, President. “In her sales and support roles, she became very well acquainted with our customer base and their needs and requirements. This knowledge, plus her background and natural abilities, make her an ideal candidate for this important role. We look forward to her continued contributions as we continue to grow the company and enhance the capabilities of our software solutions. ” “I’m thrilled to have this opportunity to continue to evolve our flagship products to meet the needs of today’s demanding print industry,” Wymore said. “Focusing on user experience, further developing our product integrations and workflow automation to make our customers’ businesses successful will be at the center of our efforts.” Aleyant Pressero™ is an affordable and easy-to-use cloud-based B2B or B2C online storefront solution that can quickly and easily be customized to individual client needs. This includes ‘mobile-first’ design for branded sites to ensure proper display regardless of the viewing device being used. Pressero can be enhanced with the addition of Aleyant eDocBuilder™, a web-based variable data publishing system built specifically to easily integrate into Aleyant or third-party web-to-print or MIS solutions features advanced typography control, imposition, scripting support, PDF workflows, rapid template creation, Excel merge capabilities and more. Aleyant’s Automated Workflow Integrator™ (AWI) uses a rules-based approach to automate such processes as file renaming, unzipping zipped files, or sending files and metadata directly to a RIP for processing, eliminating multiple steps in the workflow. Aleyant PrintJobManager™ is a Zapier-compatible cloud-based print job management solution that includes a fast means of generating market-driven pricing, job management, inventory control, planning and estimating across a variety of production technologies and applications. Print operations can also be enhanced by using Aleyant tFLOW™ (formerly Tucanna tFLOW), a powerful digital and large format automation workflow solution that is already integrated into the Aleyant ecosystem. tFLOW allows customers, sales representatives, prepress operators and production teams to collaborate in real-time 24/7 with total visibility, eliminating lengthy email chains, text messages and calls that cause missed deadlines and costly mistakes and delays. For additional information about Aleyant offerings, please visit http://www.Aleyant.com or call +1.630.929.0104. Our blog can be found at blog.pressero.com. Founded in 2005, Aleyant is an innovative leader in providing robust software services to the graphic communications industry at value-driven prices. Aleyant creates web-to-print, estimating and production, and prepress automation workflow software for graphic arts professionals. By unifying production processes, we expand our customers’ ability to be more available, efficient and profitable. Aleyant’s flagship web-to-print software, Pressero™, is a highly customizable retail and business-to-business storefront interface and has launched many of its clients into the exciting world of Internet-based print sales. Aleyant also offers a web-based online design and variable data publishing (VDP) system, eDocBuilder™, as a separate product, as well as Aleyant tFLOW™, a powerful digital and large format automation workflow solution that is integrated into the Aleyant ecosystem. Aleyant PrintJobManager™ is a Zapier-compatible cloud-based print job management solution that includes a fast means of generating market-driven pricing, job management, inventory control, planning and estimating across a variety of production technologies and applications. Aleyant solutions are already integrated with multiple MIS and web-to-print systems and are easily integrated with other third-party offerings commonly used in printing operations.


NEW YORK, December 12, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Stock-Callers.com previews the performances of these General Building Materials equities at the close: US Concrete Inc. (NASDAQ: USCR), Beacon Roofing Supply Inc. (NASDAQ: BECN), Armstrong World Industries Inc. (NYSE: AWI), and NCI Building...


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Biologists discover a new octopus species at more than 4,000 meters depth that guard their eggs, likely for years prior to hatching, and a community which may not survive without hard substrate such as manganese nodules Bremerhaven/Germany, 19 December 2016. Manganese nodules on the seabed of the Pacific Ocean are an important breeding ground for deep-sea octopuses. As reported by a German-American team of biologists in the current issue of the journal Current Biology, the octopuses deposit their eggs onto sponges that only grow locally on manganese nodules. The researchers had observed the previously unknown octopus species during diving expeditions in the Pacific at depths of more than 4000 metres - new record depths for these octopuses. Their specific dependence on manganese nodules for brooding eggs shows that the industrial extraction of resources in the deep sea must be preceded by thorough investigations into the ecological consequences of such actions. Do you know Casper? In February this year, the deep-sea octopus (Octopoda, suborder: Incirrina) became a social media star within only a few days. The US diving robot Deep Discovery detected the approximately ten centimetre marine creature off the Hawaiian Necker Island at a depth of 4290 metres, taking close-up video and publishing the footage online. The web community named the virtually transparent octopus Casper, after the famous cartoon ghost. The video was watched hundreds of thousands of times - but only now are researchers in the journal Current Biology revealing the extensive knowledge about life in the deep sea and the ecological significance of the manganese nodules that they have managed to tease out of the observation of this Hawaiian Casper octopus, and 28 additional observations of similar octopuses made elsewhere in the Pacific. Record depth: Octopuses guard their eggs at more than 4000 metres depth The appearance of the Hawaiian Casper octopus in front of the camera at a depth of 4290 metres is the greatest depth at which such finless octopuses have to date been observed. Six months earlier, researchers of the Alfred Wegener Institute, the GEOMAR, the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, and the Centre for Marine Environmental Sciences (MARUM) had filmed and photographed more specimens of this or similar hitherto unknown octopus species at a depth of 4120 to 4197 metres in the Peru Basin in the south-eastern Pacific Ocean. The photos and films of these octopuses were taken with diving robot ROV KIEL 6000 and a towed camera system (AWI-OFOS). "Until we made these observations, we had assumed that these octopuses only occur at depths of up to 2600 metres. But the species discovered can now be seen to colonise much greater depths," says lead author Dr Autun Purser of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI). Without manganese nodules the octopuses cannot find a brooding ground Two of the octopuses were seen by the camera system to be guarding their eggs. "At a depth of 4000 metres, these animals had deposited their eggs onto the stems of dead sponges, which in turn had grown on manganese nodules. The nodules served as the only anchoring point for the sponges on the otherwise very muddy seafloor. This means that without the manganese nodules the sponges would not have been able to live in this spot, and without sponges the octopuses would not have found a place to lay their eggs," the AWI researcher explains. What's more: Even octopuses not actually brooding seek the proximity of manganese nodules and rocky protrusions. "The video footage indicates that the animals have cleaned the seabed around the nodules. It probably looks like that because the animals have been filmed using their arms to dig into the sediment around the nodules probably in search for food," says co-author Henk-Jan Hoving of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research. The so-called DISCOL experiment from the late 1980s shows that many deep-sea animals need manganese nodules in their habitat. At the time, also in the Peru Basin, German researchers had removed manganese nodules by ploughing them into the seabed. In subsequent years, they observed the consequences of this human intervention on the deep-sea community. 26 years later, researchers of the expedition with RV Sonne returned to the place where the DISCOL experiment was carried out. Their conclusion: "The removal of the manganese nodules at that time caused the community of animals that are attached to the seafloor, which also includes sponges, to almost fully collapse. Even 26 years later many animal populations have not yet recovered," explain the authors in the new study. "Our new observations show that we have to know about the behaviour of deep-sea animals and the specific way in which they adapt to their habitat in order to draw up sustainable protective and usage concepts," says AWI researcher Antje Boetius, head of the Sonne expedition to the Peru Basin. Octopuses probably guard their spawn for many years She classifies Casper and similar species as "particularly endangered" - as research has shown many deep-sea octopuses to only lay very few eggs and have extremely long reproductive cycles. Offspring of octopuses that spawn when in water temperature of three degrees Celsius have been observed to hatch after four years of continuous brooding. However, at the bottom of the Peru Basin, water temperature is a mere 1.5 degrees Celsius. "We therefore suspect that the octopus embryos here need many years to develop fully," says Antje Boetius. Disturbances during this important period would in all likelihood have serious consequences for the octopus offspring. The observation data presented as part of the current study was collected during several expeditions. The shots from the Peru Basin were taken in the autumn 2015 during a research cruise by the German research vessel Sonne. The dives of the Deep Discovery robot near the Hawaiian Necker Island were part of an expedition of the US research vessel Okeanos Explorer and took place in February 2016. Further observations were made during a tour of the Kilo Moana research vessel in 2011. The research was funded by the EU project "Managing Impacts of Deep-seA reSource exploitation (MIDAS)". The work on board the Sonne research vessel was made possible by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research as part of the "Mining Impact of the Joint Programming Initiative Healthy and Productive Seas and Oceans (JPIO)" project.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Amidst soaring concerns over the rising temperatures at unheard levels in the range of 20°C plus (36°F) at the North Pole, the Arctic area is hogging greater scientific attention with many plans floating on how to stem the erosion of sea ice. The latest contingency plan seeks to 'refreeze' the Arctic by installing 10 million wind-powered pumps that will spray sea water to the surface of the sea ice for replenishing and reinforcing thickness during winter. "Thicker ice would mean longer-lasting ice. In turn, that would mean the danger of all sea ice disappearing from the Arctic in summer would be reduced significantly," said Steven Desch who is the lead researcher and Arizona State University physicist. Calling for proactive action to restore ice than preaching restraint to stop emission, the scientist noted that by merely telling people not to burn fossil fuels will not work. "Our only strategy at present seems to be to tell people to stop burning fossil fuels," added Desch. The project has been published in Earth's Future. The cost of adding 10 million pumps has been worked out to be $500 billion. The scientists argue that the current loss of ice is twice the rate predicted a few years ago and the 2015 Paris climate agreement is inadequate in checking the region's sea ice from total vanishing by 2030. According to environmentalists, if Arctic sea ice cover is lost completely, then the consequences would be far-reaching and may affect many species — including Arctic cod and polar bears — and finish its rare habitat. The removal of ice will also take away the buffer that deflects solar radiation and hasten the melting of permafrost and push many greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. Other projects to stem sea-ice loss include whitening of Arctic by spraying light-colored aerosol particles to reflect solar radiation and pumping of seawater into the atmosphere to make clouds reflect sunlight away from the surface. Despite the costly nature of these imaginative projects, the fact that they are being considered shows the level of anxiety prevailing among scientists on the Arctic's ice loss. "The situation is causing grave concern," said Professor Julienne Stroeve from the University College London. According to the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, the coverage of Arctic's sea ice in January at 13.38 million square km has been the lowest ever in four decades after the satellite tracking of the polar region started. Scientists are expecting the complete loss of sea ice in Arctic by 2030 if the current rate of emission persists. Meanwhile, Arctic pollution is also hogging the limelight. A team of researchers from Germany wrote in Deep Sea Research about the scale of polar pollution. In the paper, Mine K. Tekman of the Alfred Wegener Institute expressed surprise at the bulging garbage washed up in the Arctic despite its far-flung location. Their study tracked garbage growth from 2002 to 2014, especially the menace of growth in small plastic waste. The team watched litter at two stations between Greenland and Svalbard under the AWI deep-sea observatory network and noticed how receding Arctic sea has been augmenting the influx of tourism and shipping into the area. After imaging 2,500 meters of depth, the team observed that 3,485 pieces of litter per square kilometer had grown to 6,333 by 2014. The report noted the "current waste management frameworks are inadequate" in handling the problem of marine litter pollution. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | November 5, 2016
Site: www.spie.org

Using ordered nanostructures on optical fiber tips as molecular nanoprobes Since the development of an enzymatic electrode in 1962,1 biosensors have been proposed for a range of applications (including healthcare monitoring, clinical analysis, drug development, food monitoring, homeland security, and environmental monitoring). Indeed, in recent years, ever more powerful analytical and diagnostic tools have been continuously demanded in the healthcare and pharmaceutical sectors, i.e., for the identification of diseases and for the detection of target biomolecules at very low concentrations, at precise locations that are often hard to reach. New technology-enabled approaches are therefore required for the development of ‘smart needles’ that have unprecedented functionality, integration and miniaturization levels, and that can be used to monitor clinically relevant parameters in real time, directly inside the human body. Optical fibers (OFs) are unrivaled candidates for such in vivo point-of-care diagnostics. This is because of their intrinsic property of conducting light to a remote location, as well as their microscopic light-coupled cross section, ultrahigh aspect ratio, biocompatibility, mechanical robustness/flexibility, and easy integration with medical catheters and needles. The intriguing combination of on-chip nanophotonic biosensors and the unique advantages of OFs has thus led to the development of so-called lab-on-fiber technology (LOFT).2, 3 Before LOFT platforms can be definitively established, however, there is one main issue that needs to be addressed, namely, the lack of stable, effective, and reproducible fabrication procedures that have parallel-production capability. To date, many prestigious research groups in the photonics community have focused their efforts on addressing the major challenge of matching the micro/nanotechnology world with that of OFs.4, 5 To further that pursuit and to fabricate regular patterns on an OF tip, in this work we propose and demonstrate a novel lithographic approach that is based on particle self-assembly6 at the nanoscale.7, 8 By exploiting the extreme light–matter interaction that can be achieved when nanostructures are used, we have successfully used our decorated fiber tips as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. Such platforms thus enable the realization of ultrasensitive tools for in vivo molecular recognition. In our approach (see Figure 1), we achieve the nanopattern by assembling polystyrene nanospheres (PSNs) at the air/water interface (AWI), which leads to the formation of a monolayer colloidal crystal (MCC). To produce floating MCCs, we drop an alcoholic suspension on a water surface. The difference in surface tension of the two substances causes the alcohol to spread quickly. The PSNs are thus pushed onto the AWI, where—through collective motion and capillary force—they self-assemble. To achieve the final transfer of the nanopattern onto the fiber tip, we use a simple dipping method to achieve the final transfer of the nanopattern onto the fiber tip, i.e., we lift part of the MCC island that is floating on the water surface onto the fiber. Figure 1. (A) Schematic representation of polystyrene nanosphere (PSN) assembly at the air/water interface (AWI), which leads to the formation of a monolayer colloidal crystal (MCC), as well as subsequent deposition on the fiber. Photographs of (B) the equipment used for the PSN self-assembly at the AWI, where the silicon (Si) conduit plate is partially immersed in the water (as indicated by the bright green color caused by the presence of the packed nanospheres) and (C) the MCCs (which appear green because of light diffraction) floating on water. By applying further treatments to the MCCs, we can efficiently produce different nanostructures (with completely different morphological features), as shown in Figure 2. We obtained a close-packed array of metallo-dielectric nanostructures by simply depositing thin gold overlays on the uncoated fiber/MCC assemblies. We also produced arrays of gold triangular nanoislands by removing the metal-coated spheres. Furthermore, we can easily obtain sparse arrays if we use oxygen plasma etching on the uncoated fiber/MCC assemblies to reduce the PSN size. Holey gold nanostructures can be obtained—through PSN removal—from the sparse arrays. In our work, we have also verified the repeatability of our process (see Figure 3) and have thus demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed fabrication route. The kinds of complex, nanoscale, metallo-dielectric structures we have produced can trigger interesting plasmonic phenomena (with strong field localization) and can thus enable the development of advanced platforms for biosensing applications.9 In our study, we conducted SERS measurements (in which illumination and collection of the scattered light were made externally to the fiber tip) to demonstrate that our decorated fiber tips can be used efficiently as repeated SERS substrates. In these tests, we detected the benchmark molecule (crystal violet) at a concentration as low as 1μM (see Figure 3). In summary, we have developed a simple and cost-effective self-assembly approach for the integration of functional materials (at the nanoscale) on OF tips. Our methodology thus provides a valuable tool for the development of advanced OF bioprobes. In particular, we have demonstrated the fabrication of reproducible SERS fiber tips that can be used to detect a benchmark molecule at a very low concentration. We now hope to drive the exploitation of this promising technology for practical scenarios. Specifically, we will address important issues such as the identification of suitable methodologies for the excitation and collection of Raman signals with the same patterned OF.


Short film 'Mia's Story' is the 33rd short film to enter Art With Impact's mental health film collection Art With Impact (AWI) is excited to congratulate Vicki Kisner for the film 'Mia’s Story’ which is the March 2017 addition to AWI's OLIVE Film Collection. The film follows Mia, a 16 year old who has been feeling low but is unsure as to why. After being diagnosed with anxiety and depression she begins to receive specialized help and learns how to cope with her feelings which empowers her and allows her to feel mentally well. Filmmaker Vicki Kisner is a writer and director of short films and campaign films, and is currently writing her first feature length script. She has been commissioned to make a number of social awareness and campaign films for the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service in London, with whom Vicki collaborated to create 'Mia's Story'. Art With Impact’s monthly film competition awards one winning filmmaker a $1,000 cash prize for a film — up to five minutes in length and of any genre — that uses mental health as the point of interest. Film topics may either be interpretive of mental health, or address it directly. Winning films are added to AWI’s diverse OLIVE Film Collection, which is used in educational outreach programs. Read all submission guidelines here and submit your own film!

Loading AWI collaborators
Loading AWI collaborators