Avvm Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi

Thanjāvūr, India

Avvm Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi

Thanjāvūr, India

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Vijayakumar S.,Avvm Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Morvin Yabesh J.E.,Avvm Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Prabhu S.,Avvm Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Ayyanar M.,Avvm Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Damodaran R.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi
Journal of Ethnopharmacology | Year: 2015

Aim of study: India has great biodiversity of fauna. The use of fauna withmedicinal properties is a common practice since pre-hispanic times. In the last decade, there has been an interest in ethnozoological studies in India. Ethnozoological studies are necessary in order to discover new medications for human health. There is urgency in recording such data. This is the first ethnozoological study in which statistical calculations about animals are done by the ICF method in Kerala, India. The purpose of this study is to analyze and record traditional knowledge of animals utilized by the indigenous people living on Silent Valley, located in Palakkad district of Kerala, India and to document the traditional names, preparation and uses of these animals. Materials and methods: Field study was carried out for a period of September 2011 to August 2012 years in Kerala. The ethnomedicinal information was collected through interviews, informal meetings, open and group discussions and overt observations with semi-structured questionnaires among traditional healers. The collected data were analyzed through informant consensus factor (ICF) and fidelity level (FL). Results: This study recorded a total of 57 families, 66 genera, and 69 species of animals that produced 163 methods for usages. Mammalian occupied 29% of the total animals listed, followed by aves (28%), insects (17%), reptiles (10%), actinopterygii (4%), malacostraca, amphibians and clitellata (each 3%), chilopoda (2%) and gastropoda (1%) of the whole, respectively. In regards to usage, 68 species utilized as food products and medicinal uses, totaled 98.55% followed by one species for cosmetics (1.45%). Conclusion: This study indicated that the animals are still being used by the local healers of Palakkad district, to treat various illnesses. The empirical knowledge reported in this study will provide outstanding possibilities for the discovery of new sources of medicine for the drug industry. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


Chandrasekaran R.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Ashok Kumar G.V.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi
Malaysian Journal of Microbiology | Year: 2011

Solvent extracts of native purple non-sulfur bacterial (PNSB) isolates from the effluents of brackish shrimp culture ponds, near Nagapattinam coast (South India) were evaluated for antibacterial activity by the disc diffusion method. Best results were shown by the chloroform extracts against oxytetracycline resistant Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischerii. Among the purple non-sulfur bacterial isolates, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, showed maximum antagonistic activity. The findings suggest that the antagonistic extracts from Rba. sphaeroides could be used as an effective antibiotic in controlling Vibrio spp., in aquaculture systems.


Morvin Yabesh J.E.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Prabhu S.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Vijayakumar S.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi
Journal of Ethnopharmacology | Year: 2014

Ethnopharmacological relevance Medicinal plants are treating and preventing a variety disease. There is urgency in recording such data. This is the first ethno botanical study in which statistical calculations about plants are done by ICF method. The present study was aimed to identify plants collected for medicinal purposes by the traditional healers of silent valley, located in Palakad district of Kerala, India and to document the traditional names, preparation and uses of these plants. Materials and methods Field study was carried out a period of 2 years in Kerala. The ethno medicinal information was collected through interviews among traditional healers. The collected data were analyzed through use value (UV) informant consensus factor (Fic) and fidelity level (FL). Results A total of 102 species of plants distributed in 95 genera belonging to 53 families were identified as commonly used ethno medicinal plants by traditional healers in silent valley for the treatment of 19 ailment categories based on the body systems treated. Leaves were the most frequently used plant parts and most of the medicines were prepared in the form of paste and administrated orally. Fic values of the present study indicated that dermatological infections/diseases and gastro-intestinal disorders had highest use reports and 7 species of plants has the highest fidelity level of 100%. The most important species according to their use value were Moringa oleifera (2.62), Curculigo orchioides (2.5) Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, Vitex negundo (each 2.37), Carica papaya (2.12), Annona squamosa (1.87). Conclusion Gathering the present study, we can recommended the plants Moringa oleifera, Curculigo orchioides, Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, Vitex negundo, Carica papaya, Citrus hystrix, and Tribulus terrestris (with high use values), Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, Aloe vera, Carum capticum and Discorea pentaphylla (newly reported claims with highest FL) for further scientific investigation based upon the traditional knowledge of medicinal plants can be an approach in the discovery and development of novel drug leads. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Thirumurugan K.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Ravichandran K.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi
Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Electronics | Year: 2014

Zinc doped tin oxide (ZTO) films were deposited from starting solutions having different solvent volumes (10, 20 ... 50 mL), using a simplified spray pyrolysis technique. The effects of solvent volume on the structural, electrical, optical and surface morphological properties were investigated. From the structural studies, it is observed that the preferential orientation is along the (200) plane for lower solvent volumes and it turns in favour of (101) plane for the higher solvent volume levels (40 and 50 mL), indicating the stable p-type conductivity. Electrical studies show that the sheet resistance (R sh) increases as the solvent volume increases. The minimum sheet resistance (4.32 kâ.,?sq.) is obtained in the case of minimum solvent volume (10 mL). The Hall measurements reveal that the type inversion takes place beyond 30 mL of solvent volume. The optical transmittance increases as the solvent volume is increased and it is found to be in the range of 80-95 %. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Prabhu S.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Vijayakumar S.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Yabesh J.E.M.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Ravichandran K.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi | Sakthivel B.,AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi
Journal of Ethnopharmacology | Year: 2014

Ethnopharmacological relevance The aim of the present study was to document the medicinal plants by the traditional medical practitioners from Kalrayan hills of Villupuram district in Tamil Nadu, India. Quantitatively analyses of the data were made to acquire some useful leads for further studies. Materials and methods Successive free listing was the method adopted for the interview. In this study, 54 traditional healer medical practitioners were included and their knowledge on medicinal plants was gathered. The data were assessed with the help of two indices viz., informant consensus factor (Fic) and Informant Agreement on Remedies (IAR). Results The present survey is in accordance with some of the aspects of our previous surveys. Regarding the demography of the informants, it exhibited unevenness in male-female ratio and majority of the informants were poorly educated. Practicing this system of medicine as part time job by majority of the informants might indicate the reduced social status of this medicinal system. The present study had recorded the usage of 81 species, which in turn yielded 1073 use reports. The major illness category 'aphrodisiac, hair care and endocrinal disorders' hold a high Fic values. Among the other illness categories, gastro-intestinal ailments, genito-urinary ailments and dermatological infection ailments have a high percentage of use reports. Eye ailments, general health, kapha ailments, psychological ailments and skeleton muscular system ailments were the other illness categories with high Fic values. Some of the claims viz., Argyrolobium roseum (aphrodisiac ailments), Rosa brunonii (eye ailments) Hibiscus surattensis (dermatological infections ailments), Bauhinia variegata (neurology Ailments), Cotinus coggygria (circulatory system/cardiovascular ailments) and Uvaria narum (gastro-intestinal ailments) which have relatively high consensus can be taken up for further biomedical studies, since no substantial studies have been conducted on them. Conclusion Based on the results of our present study, we have highlighted some claims which are at high use in the study area but having little scientific support. Studies on such claims will provide scientific base to some extent which in turn will be useful to improve the health of indigenous people. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi
Type: | Journal: Journal of ethnopharmacology | Year: 2015

The purpose of this study was designed to gather primary folk knowledge on different animal based therapies used by Malayalis in Pachamalai hills. This is the first ethnozoological study in Pachamalai hills; the data regarding the medicinal animals/animal products were documented and their usages were analyzed quantitatively.Data was collected following the interviews from key informants (N=89) and reported diseases and health complications were classified in 18 categories. Seven quantitative indexes such as informant consensus factor (FIC), fidelity level (FL), relative frequency of citation (RFC), relative importance (RI), cultural importance index (CII), index of agreement on remedies (IAR) and cultural agreement index (CAI) were used to analyze the reported animal species.A total of 46 animal species belonging to 8 taxonomic groups were documented to be used in traditional medicine by Malayalis in Pachamalai hills. Animal based medicines were prepared from whole animals or their body parts or products extracted from them such as: butter, meat, milk, bones, horn, musk, skin, fin, honey, mucus, eggs, urine, excreta, hair and legs. The most encountered taxonomic group was Mammalia having 14 species. Aphrodisiac ailments (AA) (0.99), Dental care ailments (DCA) (0.99), Endocrinal disorders ailments (EDA) (0.99), Hair care ailments (HCA) (0.99), Oncology ailments (OA) (0.99) and Ortho ailments (ORTA) (0.99) gained the highest FIC value. Sus scrofa domesticus scored the highest FL (100%) for the Skeleto-muscular ailments for external cause; Lissemys punctata had the highest RI value (2.00) due to its versatility and the highest frequency of citation (RFC=1.000). Gallus domesticus had the highest cultural importance (CII=8.538) and the highest CAI value (CAI=8.427). According to IAR, Plexippus paykulli (IAR=1.00), Equus ferrus caballus (IAR=1.00), Trachypithecus johnii (IAR=1.00), Oecophylla samaragdina (IAR=1.00) and Apis indica (0.990) had the highest agreement among the informants for being used for the same medicinal purpose. Furthermore, no side effects have been reported from the use of ABT.Our study revealed that Malayalis (Pachamalai hills) possess valuable knowledge on Malayalis animal based therapies. It is believed that the present documentation will serve to record this vanishing knowledge before it is eroded completely from the island and to the scientific community. It is also anticipated that the present documentation will be fundamental to protect traditional knowledge, for the conservation and sustainable use of the rich biodiversity of Pachamalai hills for future generations and to ensure Pachamalai hills sovereign rights over its genetic resources and utilization by first documenting them. In addition, further experimental investigations are required to elucidate the pharmacological properties of the reported medicinal fauna of Pachmalai hills.


PubMed | AVVM Sri Pushpam College Autonomous Poondi
Type: | Journal: Journal of ethnopharmacology | Year: 2014

The aim of the present study was to document the medicinal plants by the traditional medical practitioners from Kalrayan hills of Villupuram district in Tamil Nadu, India. Quantitatively analyses of the data were made to acquire some useful leads for further studies.Successive free listing was the method adopted for the interview. In this study, 54 traditional healer medical practitioners were included and their knowledge on medicinal plants was gathered. The data were assessed with the help of two indices viz., informant consensus factor (Fic) and Informant Agreement on Remedies (IAR).The present survey is in accordance with some of the aspects of our previous surveys. Regarding the demography of the informants, it exhibited unevenness in male-female ratio and majority of the informants were poorly educated. Practicing this system of medicine as part time job by majority of the informants might indicate the reduced social status of this medicinal system. The present study had recorded the usage of 81 species, which in turn yielded 1073 use reports. The major illness category aphrodisiac, hair care and endocrinal disorders hold a high Fic values. Among the other illness categories, gastro-intestinal ailments, genito-urinary ailments and dermatological infection ailments have a high percentage of use reports. Eye ailments, general health, kapha ailments, psychological ailments and skeleton muscular system ailments were the other illness categories with high Fic values. Some of the claims viz., Argyrolobium roseum (aphrodisiac ailments), Rosa brunonii (eye ailments) Hibiscus surattensis (dermatological infections ailments), Bauhinia variegata (neurology Ailments), Cotinus coggygria (circulatory system/cardiovascular ailments) and Uvaria narum (gastro-intestinal ailments) which have relatively high consensus can be taken up for further biomedical studies, since no substantial studies have been conducted on them.Based on the results of our present study, we have highlighted some claims which are at high use in the study area but having little scientific support. Studies on such claims will provide scientific base to some extent which in turn will be useful to improve the health of indigenous people.

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