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Szeged, Hungary

Barbai T.,Semmelweis University | Fejos Z.,Semmelweis University | Puskas L.G.,Avidin Ltd. | Timar J.,Semmelweis University | And 3 more authors.
Oncotarget | Year: 2015

We have attempted to characterize the changes occurring on the host side during the progression of human melanoma. To investigate the role of tumor microenvironment, we set up such an animal model, which was able to isolate the host related factors playing central role in metastasis formation. One of these 'factors', CCL12, was consequently selected and its behavior was examined alongside its human homologue (CCL8). In our animal model, metastasis forming primary melanoma in the host exhibited increased level of CCL12 mRNA expression. In clinical samples, when examining the tumor and the host together, the cumulative (tumor and host) CCL8 expression was lower in the group in which human primary melanoma formed lung metastasis compared to non-metastatic primary tumors. We could not detect significant difference in CCL8 receptor (CCR1) expression between the two groups. Increased migration of the examined tumor cell lines was observed when CCL8 was applied as a chemoattractant. The tumor cells and their interactions can be influenced the expression of CCL8 by dermal fibroblasts, as a significant change in the metastatic microenvironment. Furthermore, we examined changes in miRNA profile resulted by CCL8 and miR146a appears to be a promising prognostic marker for following this process. Source


Hackler Jr. L.,Avidin Ltd. | Masuda T.,Wilmer Eye Institute | Oliver V.F.,Wilmer Eye Institute | Merbs S.L.,Wilmer Eye Institute | Zack D.J.,Wilmer Eye Institute
Methods in Molecular Biology | Year: 2012

Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a useful method to isolate specific cells or cell layers of interest from heterogeneous tissues, such as the retina. The collected cells can be used for DNA, RNA, or protein analysis. We have applied LCM technology to isolate cells from the outer nuclear, inner nuclear, and ganglion cell layers of the retina for mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression and epigenetic (DNA methylation) analysis. Here, we describe the methods we have employed for sample preparation, LCM-based isolation of retinal layers, RNA/DNA extraction, RNA quality check, microRNA analysis by quantitative PCR, and DNA methylation analysis by bisulfite sequencing. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source


Ozsvari B.,Avidin Ltd. | Puskas L.G.,Avidin Ltd. | Puskas L.G.,Biological Research Center | Nagy L.I.,Avidin Ltd. | And 7 more authors.
International Journal of Molecular Medicine | Year: 2010

In recent years, a new cell-based high throughput paradigm has emerged, which seeks to identify novel, pharmacologically active cytoprotective compounds. The essence of this approach is to create experimental models of cell injury relevant for a particular disease by establishing in vitro cell-based models, followed by high-throughput testing of compounds that affect the cellular response in a desired manner. Prior approaches typically used simple end-point analyses. To assess the cytoprotective effects of novel drug candidates in real-time, we have applied a cell-microelectronic sensing technique (RT-CES), which measures changes in the impedance of individual microelectronic wells that correlates linearly with cell index (reflecting cell number, adherence and cell growth), thereby allowing the continuous determination of cell viability during oxidative stress. In vitro cytotoxicity was elicited by hydrogen peroxide in myocytes (H9c2) and hepatocytes (Hep3B). Cells were post-treated at 30 min with various reference molecules and novel cytoprotective compounds. Cytoprotection detected in the RT-CES system correlated well with the results of two classical end-pointbased methods (improvement in MTT and reduction of LDH release). The RT-CES method, when used as described in the current report, is suitable for the screening of molecular libraries to identify molecules or molecule combinations that attenuate oxidative stress-induced cell damage. Source


Antal O.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences | Hackler L.,Avidin Ltd. | Shen J.,Tongji University | Man I.,Avidin Ltd. | And 5 more authors.
Lipids in Health and Disease | Year: 2014

Background: Based on previous observations a potential resort in the therapy of the particularly radioresistant glioma would be its treatment with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) combined with irradiation. Methods: We evaluated the effect of different UFAs (arachidonic acid (AA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and oleic acid (OA)) on human U87 MG glioma cell line by classical biochemical end-point assays, impedance-based, real-time cellular and holographic microscopic analysis. We further analyzed AA, DHA, and GLA at morphological, gene and miRNA expression level. Results: Corresponding to LDH-, MTS assays and real-time cytoxicity profiles AA, DHA, and GLA enhanced the radio sensitivity of glioma cells. The collective application of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and irradiation significantly changed the expression of EGR1, TNF-α, NOTCH1, c-MYC, TP53, HMOX1, AKR1C1, NQO1, while up-regulation of GADD45A, EGR1, GRP78, DDIT3, c-MYC, FOSL1 were recorded both in response to PUFA treatment or irradiation alone. Among the analyzed miRNAs miR-146 and miR-181a were induced by DHA treatment. Overexpression of miR-146 was also detected by combined treatment of GLA and irradiation. Conclusions: Because PUFAs increased the radio responsiveness of glioma cells as assessed by biochemical and cellular assays, they might increase the therapeutic efficacy of radiation in treatment of gliomas. We demonstrated that treatment with DHA, AA and GLA as adjunct to irradiation up-regulated the expression of oxidative-stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress related genes, and affected NOTCH1 expression, which could explain their additive effects. © 2014 Antal et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Molnar G.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences | Farago N.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences | Kocsis A.K.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences | Rozsa M.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Neuroscience | Year: 2014

Concentrations of insulin in the brain are severalfold higher than blood plasma levels. Insulin in the brain regulates the metabolism, molecular composition, and cognitive performance of microcircuits and reduces food intake; cerebral insulin levels are altered in diabetes, aging, obesity, and Alzheimer's disease. Released by pancreatic β cells, insulin passes the blood- brain barrier, but sources of locally released insulin still remain unclear. We find that insulin is strongly expressed in GABAergic neurogliaform cells in the cerebral cortex of the rat detected by single-cell digital PCR. Focal application of glucose or glibenclamide to neurogliaform cells mimics the excitation suppressing effect of external insulin on local microcircuits via insulin receptors. Thus, neurogliaform cells might link GABAergic and insulinergic action in cortical microcircuits. © 2014 the authors. Source

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