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Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University
Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces | Year: 2014

The adsorption behaviour of proteins depends significantly on their molecular properties and system conditions. To study this relation, the effect of relative exposed hydrophobicity, protein concentration and ionic strength on the adsorption rate and adsorbed amount is studied using β-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin and lysozyme. The curves of surface elastic modulus versus surface pressure of all three proteins, under different conditions (i.e. concentration and ionic strength) superimposed. This showed that the interactions between the adsorbed proteins are similar and that the adsorbed proteins retain their native state. In addition, the adsorption rate (kadsorb) was shown to scale with the relative hydrophobicity and ionic strength. Moreover, the adsorbed amount was shown to be dependent on the protein charge and the ionic strength. Based on these results, a model is proposed to predict the maximum adsorbed amount (Γmax). The model approximates the adsorbed amount as a close-packed monolayer using a hard-sphere approximation with an effective protein radius which depends on the electrostatic repulsion. The theoretical adsorbed amount was in agreement with experimental Γmax (±10%). © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Source


Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University
Journal of Colloid and Interface Science | Year: 2014

This study investigates the influence of succinylation on the molecular properties (i.e. charge, structure and hydrophobicity) and the flocculation behavior of patatin-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions. Patatin was succinylated to five degrees (0% (R0) to 57% (R2.5)). Succinylation not only resulted in a change of the protein charge but also in (partial) unfolding of the secondary structure, and consequently in an increased initial adsorption rate of the protein to the oil-water interface. The stability against salt-induced flocculation showed two distinct regimes, instead of a gradual shift in stability as expected by the DLVO theory. While flocculation was observed at ionic strengths >30mM for the emulsions stabilized by the variants with the lowest degrees of modification (R0-R1), the other variants (R1.5-R2.5) were stable against flocculation ≤200mM. This was related to the increased initial adsorption rate, and the consequent transition from a protein-poor to a protein-rich regime. This was confirmed by the addition of excess protein to the emulsions stabilized by R0-R1 which resulted in stability against salt-induced flocculation. Therefore, succinylation of patatin indirectly results in stability against salt-induced flocculation, by increasing the initial adsorption rate of the protein to the oil-water interface, leading to a shift to the protein-rich regime. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Source


Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science | Year: 2015

The protein concentration is known to determine the stability against coalescence during formation of emulsions. Recently, it was observed that the protein concentration also influences the stability of formed emulsions against flocculation as a result of changes in the ionic strength. In both cases, the stability was postulated to be the result of a complete (i.e. saturated) coverage of the interface. By combining the current views on emulsion stability against coalescence and flocculation with new experimental data, an empiric model is established to predict emulsion stability based on protein molecular properties such as exposed hydrophobicity and charge. It was shown that besides protein concentration, the adsorbed layer (i.e. maximum adsorbed amount and interfacial area) dominates emulsion stability against coalescence and flocculation. Surprisingly, the emulsion stability was also affected by the adsorption rate. From these observations, it was concluded that a completely covered interface indeed ensures the stability of an emulsion against coalescence and flocculation. The contribution of adsorption rate and adsorbed amount on the stability of emulsions was combined in a surface coverage model. For this model, the adsorbed amount was predicted from the protein radius, surface charge and ionic strength. Moreover, the adsorption rate, which depends on the protein charge and exposed hydrophobicity, was approximated by the relative exposed hydrophobicity (QH). The model in the current state already showed good correspondence with the experimental data, and was furthermore shown to be applicable to describe data obtained from literature. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2015

Typically, heat-induced aggregation of proteins is studied using a single protein under various conditions (e.g., temperature). Because different studies use different conditions and methods, a mechanistic relationship between molecular properties and the aggregation behavior of proteins has not been identified. Therefore, this study investigates the kinetics of heat-induced aggregation and the size/density of formed aggregates for three different proteins (ovalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and patatin) under various conditions (pH, ionic strength, concentration, and temperature). The aggregation rate of β-lactoglobulin was slower (>10 times) than that of ovalbumin and patatin. Moreover, the conditions (pH, ionic strength, and concentration) affected the aggregation kinetics of β-lactoglobulin more strongly than for ovalbumin and patatin. In contrast to the kinetics, for all proteins the aggregate size/density increased with decreasing electrostatic repulsion. By comparing these proteins under these conditions, it became clear that the aggregation behavior cannot easily be correlated to the molecular properties (e.g., charge and exposed hydrophobicity). © 2015 American Chemical Society. Source


Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University | Van Nieuwenhuijzen N.H.,AVEBE | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University
Langmuir | Year: 2013

Glycation of proteins by the Maillard reaction is often considered as a method to prevent flocculation of protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions. The effect has been suggested, but not proven, to be the result of steric stabilization, and to depend on the molecular mass of the carbohydrate moiety. To test this, the stabilities of emulsions of patatin glycated to the same extent with different mono- and oligosaccharides (xylose, glucose, maltotriose, and maltopentaose) were compared under different conditions (pH and electrolyte concentration). The emulsions with non-modified patatin flocculate under conditions in which the zeta potential is decreased (around the iso-electric point and at high ionic strength). The attachment of monosaccharides (i.e., glucose) did not affect the flocculation behavior. Attachment of maltotriose and maltopentaose (Mw > 500 Da), on the other hand, provided stability against flocculation at the iso-electric point. Since the zeta potential and the interfacial properties of the emulsion droplets are not affected by the attachment of the carbohydrate moieties, this is attributed to steric stabilization. Experimentally, a critical thickness of the adsorbed layer required for steric stabilization against flocculation was found to be 2.29-3.90 nm. The theoretical determination based on the DLVO interactions with an additional steric interaction coincides with the experimental data. Hence, it can be concluded that the differences in stability against pH-induced flocculation are caused by steric interactions. © 2013 American Chemical Society. Source

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