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Starch derivatives are used in a number of industries for various functions. They are used as thickeners and stabilizers in the food and beverage industry, as a tablet binder in the pharmaceutical industry, as an emulsifier in cosmetics, and fiber additive in the animal feed. Some of the other functions of starch derivatives are flocculation, adhesiveness, film-forming, pH stability improvement, and shear stability, acid stability, and process tolerance enhancement. It is possible to modify starches to increase their stability against excessive heat, cooling, acid, time, shear or freezing; to change their texture; and to increase or decrease their viscosity, depending on the application. The different stakeholders in the industry are product manufacturers, raw material suppliers, and processors. Based on type, the market is classified into various segments such as Maltodextrin, Cyclodextrin, Glucose Syrup, Hydrolysates, and Modified Starch. Among these, glucose syrup holds a major market share, whereas Maltodextrin has the highest demand in the market. Glucose syrup finds its applications in various industries such as paper, feeds, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Glucose syrup is often employed as a flavor enhancer, texture agent, volume-adding agent, and inhibitor of sugar from crystallizing in drinks. On the basis of application, the starch derivatives market is classified as Food & Beverages, Feed, Paper, Cosmetics, Pharmaceuticals, Bio-Ethanol, and other industrial applications. Among these, starch derivatives find their key application in food and beverages. Increasing demand for convenience food and beverages in developing countries, rise in population, and increasing per-capita income are some of the key factors propelling the growth of starch derivatives market. Companies are investing large amounts of their capital on research and development. These developments are bettering the prospects of starch derivative products in the global market. In addition, starch plays an important role in the bio-fuel, glue production, textile weaving and finishing, and the fermentation industries. However, implementation of bio-fuel policies and increasing raw material prices are some of the factors hindering the growth of the starch derivatives market. Asia Pacific is the leading starch derivatives market and is likely to achieve the highest growth rate in the near future. This is due to the emerging economies of the two most populated countries in the world, namely, China and India. The starch derivatives market in North America and Europe is saturated. The demand for starch derivatives is increasing in Brazil and Argentina as these two countries have the fastest growth rate in the world. Key players operating in the starch derivatives market include AGRANA Investment Corp., Archer Daniels Midland Company, Cargill Incorporated, and AVEBE. Other prominent vendors present in the starch derivatives market are Tate & Lyle, RAQUETTE, Emsland-Starke Gmbh, Ingredion Incorporated, Grain Processing Corporation, BENEO, INGREDION INCORPORATED, LASENOR EMUL, S.L., Lipoid GmbH, Stern-Wywiol Gruppe GmbH & Co. KG, and Penford Corporation.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— Global corn starch market is analyzed for the world’s main regions in this research including market size, share, trends, conditions, product price, profit, capacity, production, capacity utilization, supply, demand and industry growth rate, on a case to case basis. Key application areas of corn starch, like starch sugar, monosodium glutamate, medicine, organic acid and alcohol and modified starch are assessed on the basis of performance in terms of consumption and growth rate. Market predictions along with the statistical nuances presented in the report render an insightful view of the corn starch market. The global corn starch market 2017 report has forecasted compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in % value for defined period, to help its readers take practical decision based on actual and futuristic charts. Split by product type, production, revenue, price, corn starch market share and growth rate is provided for edible, industrial and officinal corn starch. Report also includes coverage of key market players in corn starch industry. Market size of corn starch is estimated and the report covers every aspect of the global market, starting from the basic information and advancing further to various significant criteria, based on which, the industry is segmented. Not yet sure about ordering this report? Have questions? Share with us @ http://emarketorg.com/inquire-before-buying/?product-id=86223 and eMarketOrg.com will help with relevant answers to help purchase the research. Historical data available in the report elaborates on the development of the corn starch market on national, regional and international levels. The report uses this data on current state of the market to further list trends that have brought market shifts. In addition to this, the supervisory scenario of the market has been covered in the report from both, global and regional, perspectives. The competitive framework of the corn starch market in terms of contribution and share of major companies has been evaluated in the report. The top players and their overall business view covering a basic profile, manufacturing details, product and offerings information and more have been included in the report. These companies include ADM, Cargill, Ingredion, Penford Products, Tate & Lyle Americas, Roquette, Argo, Gea, AVEBE, Nihon Shokuhin Kako, Japan Corn Starch, Sanwa Starch, Zhucheng Xingmao, Changchun Dacheng, Xiwang Group, Luzhou Group, COFCO, China Starch, Wanshunda Group, Xi’an Guowei, Lihua Starch, Henan Julong Biological Engineering, Hebei Derui Starch Company, Corn Development Company and Longlive. The study on global corn starch industry 2017-2022 is a detailed report scrutinizing statistical data related to the global market. Furthermore, the factors on which the companies compete in the market have been evaluated in the report. The report offers a close summary of the key segments within the market. Another study titled Global Modified Starch Market Research Report 2017 talks about companies like Starch Solution, Cargill, Budi Starch & Sweetener, Akzo Nobel, Ingredion and Bumi Sari Prima. Modified cassava starch, modified sago starch and modified corn starch product types are discussed for their applications across food & beverages, paper making and textile, pharmaceuticals, animal feed and cosmetics industries. Read more at http://emarketorg.com/pro/global-modified-starch-market-research-report-2017/ . Explore more reports on starch market at http://emarketorg.com/?s=starch&post_type=product . About Us: eMarketOrg.com aims to provide businesses and organizations market intelligence products and services that help in making smart, instant and crucial decisions. Our database offers access to insights from industry leaders, experts and influencers on global and regional sectors, market trends, user behaviour, for companies as well as products. With data and information from reputable and trusted private and public sources, our clients are never short of statistics and analysis that are up to date. Connect With Us: Market Research Blog: http://emarketorg.com/blog/ News on current market trends and more: http://emarketorg.com/news1/ Contact Us: http://emarketorg.com/contact-us/ Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/emarketorg Follow us on G+ https://plus.google.com/collection/w7ioaB For more information, please visit http://emarketorg.com/pro/global-corn-starch-market-research-report-2017/


This report studies sales (consumption) of Cationic Starch in Europe market, especially in Germany, UK, France, Russia, Italy, Benelux and Spain, focuses on top players in these countries, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each player in these Countries, covering Roquette(FR) Tate & Lyle(US) Cargill(US) Ingredion(US) Western Polymer(US) Penford(US) AVEBE(NL) Grain Processing(US) Galam(IL) Banpong Tapioca(TH) Lyckeby Amylex(CS) Emsland Group(DE) Sunar Misir(TR) Südst?rke GmbH(DE) Santosh(IN) ASTON Starch Asia(TH) Manildra Group(AU) Saurashtra(IN) Anil(IN) Honest(IN) Venus Starch Suppliers(IN) Guangxi State Farms(CN) Shandong Fuyang biotechnology(CN) Zhejiang Yizhi Starch(CN) Dezhou Runde Starch(CN) Xilai-Starch(CN) Nantong Yunfeng Starch(CN) Zhucheng Xingmao Corn Developing(CN) Zaozhuang Jinsheng Fangzhijiangliao(CN) View Full Report With Complete TOC, List Of Figure and Table: http://globalqyresearch.com/europe-cationic-starch-market-report-2016 Market Segment by Countries, this report splits Europe into several key Countries, with sales (consumption), revenue, market share and growth rate of Cationic Starch in these countries, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like Germany France UK Russia Italy Spain Benelux Split by product type, with sales, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Type I Type II Type III Split by application, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Cationic Starch in each application, can be divided into Paper Making Performance Examples Textile Industry Mining and Sewage Treatment Industries Europe Cationic Starch Market Report 2016 1 Cationic Starch Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Cationic Starch 1.2 Classification of Cationic Starch 1.2.1 Type I 1.2.2 Type II 1.2.3 Type III 1.3 Application of Cationic Starch 1.3.1 Paper Making Performance Examples 1.3.2 Textile Industry 1.3.3 Mining and Sewage Treatment Industries 1.4 Cationic Starch Market by Countries 1.4.1 Germany Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.2 France Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.3 UK Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.4 Russia Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.5 Italy Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.6 Spain Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.7 Benelux Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.5 Europe Market Size (Value and Volume) of Cationic Starch (2011-2021) 1.5.1 Europe Cationic Starch Sales and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 1.5.2 Europe Cationic Starch Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 10 Europe Cationic Starch Manufacturers Analysis 10.1 Roquette(FR) 10.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 10.1.2 Cationic Starch Product Type, Application and Specification 10.1.2.1 Type I 10.1.2.2 Type II 10.1.3 Roquette(FR) Cationic Starch Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 10.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 10.2 Tate & Lyle(US) 10.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 10.2.2 Cationic Starch Product Type, Application and Specification 10.2.2.1 Type I 10.2.2.2 Type II 10.2.3 Tate & Lyle(US) Cationic Starch Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 10.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 10.3 Cargill(US) 10.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 10.3.2 Cationic Starch Product Type, Application and Specification 10.3.2.1 Type I 10.3.2.2 Type II 10.3.3 Cargill(US) Cationic Starch Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 10.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 10.4 Ingredion(US) 10.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 10.4.2 Cationic Starch Product Type, Application and Specification 10.4.2.1 Type I 10.4.2.2 Type II 10.4.3 Ingredion(US) Cationic Starch Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 10.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 10.5 Western Polymer(US) 10.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 10.5.2 Cationic Starch Product Type, Application and Specification 10.5.2.1 Type I 10.5.2.2 Type II 10.5.3 Western Polymer(US) Cationic Starch Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 10.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 10.6 Penford(US) 10.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 10.6.2 Cationic Starch Product Type, Application and Specification 10.6.2.1 Type I 10.6.2.2 Type II 10.6.3 Penford(US) Cationic Starch Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 10.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 10.7 AVEBE(NL) 10.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 10.7.2 Cationic Starch Product Type, Application and Specification 10.7.2.1 Type I 10.7.2.2 Type II 10.7.3 AVEBE(NL) Cationic Starch Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 10.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 10.8 Grain Processing(US) 10.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 10.8.2 Cationic Starch Product Type, Application and Specification 10.8.2.1 Type I 10.8.2.2 Type II 10.8.3 Grain Processing(US) Cationic Starch Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 10.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 10.9 Galam(IL) 10.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 10.9.2 Cationic Starch Product Type, Application and Specification 10.9.2.1 Type I 10.9.2.2 Type II 10.9.3 Galam(IL) Cationic Starch Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 10.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 10.10 Banpong Tapioca(TH) 10.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 10.10.2 Cationic Starch Product Type, Application and Specification 10.10.2.1 Type I 10.10.2.2 Type II 10.10.3 Banpong Tapioca(TH) Cationic Starch Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 10.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview 10.11 Lyckeby Amylex(CS) 10.12 Emsland Group(DE) 10.13 Sunar Misir(TR) 10.14 Südst?rke GmbH(DE) 10.15 Santosh(IN) 10.16 ASTON 10.17 Starch Asia(TH) 10.18 Manildra Group(AU) 10.19 Saurashtra(IN) 10.20 Anil(IN) 10.21 Honest(IN) 10.22 Venus Starch Suppliers(IN) 10.23 Guangxi State Farms(CN) 10.24 Shandong Fuyang biotechnology(CN) 10.25 Zhejiang Yizhi Starch(CN) 10.26 Dezhou Runde Starch(CN) 10.27 Xilai-Starch(CN) 10.28 Nantong Yunfeng Starch(CN) 10.29 Zhucheng Xingmao Corn Developing(CN) 10.30 Zaozhuang Jinsheng Fangzhijiangliao(CN) Global QYResearch ( http://globalqyresearch.com/ ) is the one spot destination for all your research needs. Global QYResearch holds the repository of quality research reports from numerous publishers across the globe. Our inventory of research reports caters to various industry verticals including Healthcare, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Technology and Media, Chemicals, Materials, Energy, Heavy Industry, etc. With the complete information about the publishers and the industries they cater to for developing market research reports, we help our clients in making purchase decision by understanding their requirements and suggesting best possible collection matching their needs.


Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University
Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces | Year: 2014

The adsorption behaviour of proteins depends significantly on their molecular properties and system conditions. To study this relation, the effect of relative exposed hydrophobicity, protein concentration and ionic strength on the adsorption rate and adsorbed amount is studied using β-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin and lysozyme. The curves of surface elastic modulus versus surface pressure of all three proteins, under different conditions (i.e. concentration and ionic strength) superimposed. This showed that the interactions between the adsorbed proteins are similar and that the adsorbed proteins retain their native state. In addition, the adsorption rate (kadsorb) was shown to scale with the relative hydrophobicity and ionic strength. Moreover, the adsorbed amount was shown to be dependent on the protein charge and the ionic strength. Based on these results, a model is proposed to predict the maximum adsorbed amount (Γmax). The model approximates the adsorbed amount as a close-packed monolayer using a hard-sphere approximation with an effective protein radius which depends on the electrostatic repulsion. The theoretical adsorbed amount was in agreement with experimental Γmax (±10%). © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University | Van Nieuwenhuijzen N.H.,AVEBE | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University
Langmuir | Year: 2013

DLVO theory is often considered to be applicable to the description of flocculation of protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions. To test this, emulsions made with different globular proteins (β-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, patatin, and two variants of ovalbumin) were compared under different conditions (pH and electrolyte concentration). As expected, flocculation was observed under conditions in which the zeta potential is decreased (around the isoelectric point and at high ionic strength). However, the extent of flocculation at higher ionic strength (>50 mM NaCl) decreased with increasing protein-exposed hydrophobicity. A higher exposed hydrophobicity resulted in a higher zeta potential of the emulsion droplets and consequently increased stability against flocculation. Furthermore, the addition of excess protein strongly increased the stability against salt-induced flocculation, which is not described by DLVO theory. In the protein-poor regime, emulsions showed flocculation at high ionic strength (>100 mM NaCl), whereas emulsions were stable against flocculation if excess protein was present. This research shows that the exposed hydrophobicity of the proteins and the presence of excess protein affect the flocculation behavior. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University | Van Nieuwenhuijzen N.H.,AVEBE | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University
Langmuir | Year: 2013

Glycation of proteins by the Maillard reaction is often considered as a method to prevent flocculation of protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions. The effect has been suggested, but not proven, to be the result of steric stabilization, and to depend on the molecular mass of the carbohydrate moiety. To test this, the stabilities of emulsions of patatin glycated to the same extent with different mono- and oligosaccharides (xylose, glucose, maltotriose, and maltopentaose) were compared under different conditions (pH and electrolyte concentration). The emulsions with non-modified patatin flocculate under conditions in which the zeta potential is decreased (around the iso-electric point and at high ionic strength). The attachment of monosaccharides (i.e., glucose) did not affect the flocculation behavior. Attachment of maltotriose and maltopentaose (Mw > 500 Da), on the other hand, provided stability against flocculation at the iso-electric point. Since the zeta potential and the interfacial properties of the emulsion droplets are not affected by the attachment of the carbohydrate moieties, this is attributed to steric stabilization. Experimentally, a critical thickness of the adsorbed layer required for steric stabilization against flocculation was found to be 2.29-3.90 nm. The theoretical determination based on the DLVO interactions with an additional steric interaction coincides with the experimental data. Hence, it can be concluded that the differences in stability against pH-induced flocculation are caused by steric interactions. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University
Journal of Colloid and Interface Science | Year: 2014

This study investigates the influence of succinylation on the molecular properties (i.e. charge, structure and hydrophobicity) and the flocculation behavior of patatin-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions. Patatin was succinylated to five degrees (0% (R0) to 57% (R2.5)). Succinylation not only resulted in a change of the protein charge but also in (partial) unfolding of the secondary structure, and consequently in an increased initial adsorption rate of the protein to the oil-water interface. The stability against salt-induced flocculation showed two distinct regimes, instead of a gradual shift in stability as expected by the DLVO theory. While flocculation was observed at ionic strengths >30mM for the emulsions stabilized by the variants with the lowest degrees of modification (R0-R1), the other variants (R1.5-R2.5) were stable against flocculation ≤200mM. This was related to the increased initial adsorption rate, and the consequent transition from a protein-poor to a protein-rich regime. This was confirmed by the addition of excess protein to the emulsions stabilized by R0-R1 which resulted in stability against salt-induced flocculation. Therefore, succinylation of patatin indirectly results in stability against salt-induced flocculation, by increasing the initial adsorption rate of the protein to the oil-water interface, leading to a shift to the protein-rich regime. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science | Year: 2015

The protein concentration is known to determine the stability against coalescence during formation of emulsions. Recently, it was observed that the protein concentration also influences the stability of formed emulsions against flocculation as a result of changes in the ionic strength. In both cases, the stability was postulated to be the result of a complete (i.e. saturated) coverage of the interface. By combining the current views on emulsion stability against coalescence and flocculation with new experimental data, an empiric model is established to predict emulsion stability based on protein molecular properties such as exposed hydrophobicity and charge. It was shown that besides protein concentration, the adsorbed layer (i.e. maximum adsorbed amount and interfacial area) dominates emulsion stability against coalescence and flocculation. Surprisingly, the emulsion stability was also affected by the adsorption rate. From these observations, it was concluded that a completely covered interface indeed ensures the stability of an emulsion against coalescence and flocculation. The contribution of adsorption rate and adsorbed amount on the stability of emulsions was combined in a surface coverage model. For this model, the adsorbed amount was predicted from the protein radius, surface charge and ionic strength. Moreover, the adsorption rate, which depends on the protein charge and exposed hydrophobicity, was approximated by the relative exposed hydrophobicity (QH). The model in the current state already showed good correspondence with the experimental data, and was furthermore shown to be applicable to describe data obtained from literature. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Wageningen University and AVEBE
Type: | Journal: Advances in colloid and interface science | Year: 2015

The protein concentration is known to determine the stability against coalescence during formation of emulsions. Recently, it was observed that the protein concentration also influences the stability of formed emulsions against flocculation as a result of changes in the ionic strength. In both cases, the stability was postulated to be the result of a complete (i.e. saturated) coverage of the interface. By combining the current views on emulsion stability against coalescence and flocculation with new experimental data, an empiric model is established to predict emulsion stability based on protein molecular properties such as exposed hydrophobicity and charge. It was shown that besides protein concentration, the adsorbed layer (i.e. maximum adsorbed amount and interfacial area) dominates emulsion stability against coalescence and flocculation. Surprisingly, the emulsion stability was also affected by the adsorption rate. From these observations, it was concluded that a completely covered interface indeed ensures the stability of an emulsion against coalescence and flocculation. The contribution of adsorption rate and adsorbed amount on the stability of emulsions was combined in a surface coverage model. For this model, the adsorbed amount was predicted from the protein radius, surface charge and ionic strength. Moreover, the adsorption rate, which depends on the protein charge and exposed hydrophobicity, was approximated by the relative exposed hydrophobicity (QH). The model in the current state already showed good correspondence with the experimental data, and was furthermore shown to be applicable to describe data obtained from literature.


Delahaije R.J.B.M.,Wageningen University | Wierenga P.A.,Wageningen University | Giuseppin M.L.F.,AVEBE | Gruppen H.,Wageningen University
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2015

Typically, heat-induced aggregation of proteins is studied using a single protein under various conditions (e.g., temperature). Because different studies use different conditions and methods, a mechanistic relationship between molecular properties and the aggregation behavior of proteins has not been identified. Therefore, this study investigates the kinetics of heat-induced aggregation and the size/density of formed aggregates for three different proteins (ovalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and patatin) under various conditions (pH, ionic strength, concentration, and temperature). The aggregation rate of β-lactoglobulin was slower (>10 times) than that of ovalbumin and patatin. Moreover, the conditions (pH, ionic strength, and concentration) affected the aggregation kinetics of β-lactoglobulin more strongly than for ovalbumin and patatin. In contrast to the kinetics, for all proteins the aggregate size/density increased with decreasing electrostatic repulsion. By comparing these proteins under these conditions, it became clear that the aggregation behavior cannot easily be correlated to the molecular properties (e.g., charge and exposed hydrophobicity). © 2015 American Chemical Society.

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