Autonomous University of Madrid

www.uam.es
Madrid, Spain

The Autonomous University of Madrid is commonly known by its Spanish initials UAM or as "la Autónoma". UAM is a Spanish public university established in 1968, along with the autonomous universities of Barcelona and Bilbao during one of Spain's most ambitious educational reforms, which took place during the late 1960s and the early 1970s. Since 1971, the university's main campus has been located in Cantoblanco, a rural area in the northern outskirts of Madrid. Despite being part of the municipality of Madrid, the campus is nearer the towns of Alcobendas and Tres Cantos. Throughout its history, UAM has been one of Spain's most prominent higher education institutions, being ranked first amongst Spanish universities by the El Mundo University Supplement , by The Times Higher Education Supplement, and by the Academic Ranking of World Universities yearly published by Shanghai Jiao Tong University. For the subject "Mathematics" the university was ranked within top 51-75 universities in the world . In the "Times Higher Education 100 Under 50 University Rankings", the University achieved 49th position globally in 2012. In another similar ranking "QS Top 50 Under 50" by Quacquarelli Symonds , the Autonomous University of Madrid recently achieved 15th place in international comparison. Its Faculty of Law is the most prestigious one in Spain. It is the Spanish university that has more researchers among the most cited according to the Thomson Reuters ranking citation in 2011. Wikipedia.

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Patent
Cellerix S.L. and Autonomous University of Madrid | Date: 2017-06-07

Provided herein are novel methods and compositions utilizing adipose tissue-derived stromal stem cells for treating fistulae.


Patent
Cellerix S.L. and Autonomous University of Madrid | Date: 2017-06-07

Provided herein are novel methods and compositions utilizing adipose tissue-derived stromal stem cells for treating fistulae.


Patent
Cellerix S.L. and Autonomous University of Madrid | Date: 2017-06-07

Provided herein are novel methods and compositions utilizing adipose tissue-derived stromal stem cells for treating fistulae.


Patent
Cellerix S.L. and Autonomous University of Madrid | Date: 2017-06-07

Provided herein are novel methods and compositions utilizing adipose tissue-derived stromal stem cells for treating fistulae.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BIOTEC-6-2015 | Award Amount: 8.81M | Year: 2016

Metagenomes comprise enormous reservoirs coding for proteins with useful activities. Unfortunately, harvesting this reservoir is difficult, because useful candidates are rare and hidden in an overwhelming majority of irrelevant genes. Screening campaigns of metagenomic libraries thus require massive capital-expenditure for robotic systems and much manpower, making them expensive, slow and available to very few users. To enable valorisation of the potential of the metagenome, this project assembles an interdisciplinary and intersectoral consortium that will integrate a range of technologies into a platform designed to beat the odds of identifying library hits faster, more efficiently and by a wider user base. Exploration and exploitation of the metagenome will be made faster and more successful by (i) ultrahigh-throughput screening in picoliter droplets that dramatically lowers the cost per assay to well below 0.01 cents and allows throughput of 10e7 assays per hour; (ii) workflows that streamline and increase the yield of library construction and functional expression and (iii) workflows for efficient bioinformatic analysis of hits based on user-friendly software solutions for metagenome analysis. Emphasis is put on technologies that are straightforwardly implemented in non-specialist labs, maximising the impact of METAFLUIDICS. This platform will be used to identify enzymes for biosynthesis of therapeutic small molecules, for green bioenergy conversion, bioremediation, food chemistry and other industrial applications


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. Such an understanding can provide profound insights into our humanity, leading to fundamentally new computing technologies, and transforming the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. Modern ICT brings this prospect within reach. The HBP Flagship Initiative (HBP) thus proposes a unique strategy that uses ICT to integrate neuroscience data from around the world, to develop a unified multi-level understanding of the brain and diseases, and ultimately to emulate its computational capabilities. The goal is to catalyze a global collaborative effort. During the HBPs first Specific Grant Agreement (SGA1), the HBP Core Project will outline the basis for building and operating a tightly integrated Research Infrastructure, providing HBP researchers and the scientific Community with unique resources and capabilities. Partnering Projects will enable independent research groups to expand the capabilities of the HBP Platforms, in order to use them to address otherwise intractable problems in neuroscience, computing and medicine in the future. In addition, collaborations with other national, European and international initiatives will create synergies, maximizing returns on research investment. SGA1 covers the detailed steps that will be taken to move the HBP closer to achieving its ambitious Flagship Objectives.


Salvio A.,Autonomous University of Madrid
Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics | Year: 2013

We obtain the bound on the Higgs and top masses to have Higgs inflation (where the Higgs field is non-minimally coupled to gravity) at full next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). Comparing the result obtained with the experimental values of the relevant parameters we find some tension, which we quantify. Higgs inflation, however, is not excluded at the moment as the measured values of the Higgs and top masses are close enough to the bound once experimental and theoretical uncertainties are taken into account. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Aleman J.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Cabrera S.,Autonomous University of Madrid
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2013

In the last decade, organocatalysis, the use of small chiral organic molecules as catalysts, has proven to be a valuable and attractive tool for the synthesis of enantiomerically enriched molecules. A number of organocatalysts and processes, such as one-pot, tandem, cascade or multicomponent reactions, have been reported to date. Furthermore, the many advantages of organocatalysis-robust, non-toxic, affordable, inert atmosphere, easy reaction manipulation, etc.-allow the preparation of bioactive compounds using simple and metal-free procedures, thus avoiding false positives in the biological evaluation. This mini-review focuses on medicinal chemistry programs that have synthesized biologically active compounds using one or more organocatalytic steps. In this respect, the potential of organocatalytic methods for enabling the chemical synthesis of important medicinal targets will be highlighted. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 711.00K | Year: 2017

Many dynamical processes in natural sciences are organized by invariant objects that behave in rather simple ways under time evolution, such as equilibria, periodic orbits, or higher-dimensional invariant surfaces. These objects and the invariant manifolds attached to them act as landmarks that organize the behavior of other trajectories and yield a qualitative description of the dynamics. By computing strategically chosen landmarks, one can obtain considerable information of the possible behaviors of the system. This strategy is particularly fruitful in Hamiltonian systems, in which a large number of invariant manifolds coexist. For example, it has been realized in recent years that Transition State theory, a framework first developed in chemistry and then applied to other fields of science, relies on the existence of invariant manifolds in phase space. These manifolds encode the essential dynamics of various reorganization processes. The objective of this RISE proposal is to build a multidisciplinary exchange programme around the determination of invariant dynamical objects which encompass applied mathematics, atomic and molecular physics, chemistry and celestial mechanics. The project aims at linking mathematicians, physicists and chemists to identify the universal mechanisms behind dynamical transition processes. The proposed collaborative project will be coordinated by the School of Mathematics of Loughborough University, and will involve the Department of Mathematics of the University of Barcelona, the Center for Theoretical Physics (CNRS / Aix Marseille University), the Physics Department of the Polytechnic University of Madrid, the Chemistry Department at the Universidad Autnoma of Madrid and the Physics Department at the University of Stuttgart. The third country partners are Georgia Institute of Technology, represented by the School of Mathematics and the School of Physics and Johns Hopkins University, represented by the School of Chemistry.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-11-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 6.00M | Year: 2017

Current orthopaedic treatments permit spontaneous bone regeneration to unite and heal 90% bone injuries. Non-union associates pain and disability, often requiring biological enhancement. Regenerative medicine research suggests to the general public that alternative treatments based on advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are already available. However, early clinical trials only explore its potential benefit. Underreported results and absence of early trial confirmation in adequately powered prospective randomized clinical trials (RCT) indicate that evidence is not available to transfer any technique into routine clinical application. This ORTHOUNION Project was developed from FP7-Project (REBORNE). Its results confirmed 92% bone healing rate (Gmez-Barrena et al, 2016 submitted manuscript) with an autologous ATMP of GMP expanded bone marrow derived human MSC in non-unions, where the reported bone healing rate after surgery with standard bone autograft is 74%. Any further development requires adequately powered prospective RCTs. This will be the main aim of ORTHOUNION: to assess clinically relevant efficacy of an autologous ATMP with GMP multicentric production in a well-designed, randomized, controlled, three-arm clinical trial under GCP, versus bone autograft, gold-standard in fracture non-unions. A non-inferiority analysis will evaluate if cell dose can be lowered. ATMP has been authorized by the National Competent Authorities of the participating countries in 3 previous trials (REBORNE) and will be monitored by ECRIN-ERIC to ensure quality and credibility of RCT results. Secondary aims include innovative strategies to increase manufacturing capacity and lower costs to pave translation into routine clinical treatments, biomaterial refinement to facilitate surgery, personalized medicine supportive instruments for patient selection and monitoring, and health economic evaluation. Results in this project may help define the future of bone regenerative medicine

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