Autoimmunity Laboratory

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France

Autoimmunity Laboratory

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France
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Pham B.N.,Reims University Hospital Center | Musset L.,Groupe Hospitalier | Chyderiotis G.,Biomnis | Olsson N.O.,CHU Dijon | Fabien N.,Autoimmunity Laboratory
Journal of Digestive Diseases | Year: 2014

Celiac disease is a complex autoimmune disease affecting patients of any age, who may present a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Different guidelines for the diagnosis and management of celiac disease have been recently published. The aim of this study was to determine whether the recommendations issued in these guidelines have been adopted by physicians in France when celiac disease was suspected. Methods: A total of 5521 physicians were asked to fill in a detailed questionnaire on diagnosing celiac disease to evaluate their medical practice, as to the type of symptoms leading to the suspicion of celiac disease, the prescription of duodenal biopsy or serological tests, the type of serological tests (anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-endomysium, anti-gliadin and anti-reticulin antibodies, total immunoglobulin A measurement) prescribed to diagnose celiac disease. Results: The analysis of the responses of 256 general practitioners (GPs), 221 gastroenterologists and 227 pediatricians showed that the protean clinical presentations of celiac disease might be better recognized by gastroenterologists and pediatricians than by GPs. Gastroenterologists asked for duodenal biopsy much more often than GPs and pediatricians when celiac disease was suspected. Serological testing and knowledge of critical markers, prescribed to diagnose celiac disease, differed among GPs, gastroenterologists and pediatricians. Conclusion: Analysis of medical prescriptions showed that the recommendations for celiac disease diagnosis are not necessarily followed by physicians, emphasizing the fact that the impact of national or international guidelines on medical behavior should be evaluated. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch.


Valenzise M.,Messina University | Fierabracci A.,Autoimmunity Laboratory | Cappa M.,Bambino Gesu Childrens Hospital | Porcelli P.,Endocrine Unit | And 5 more authors.
Hormone Research in Paediatrics | Year: 2014

Background: Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare recessive inherited disease caused by the mutation of the AIRE gene on chromosome 21. To date, 8 Sicilian patients have been described and the R203X AIRE mutation was found to be the most common in this region. Aims: (1) To describe 7 additional Sicilian APECED patients and to review all 15 Sicilian APECED patients who have been investigated by our group in the last years, and (2) to report a novel AIRE gene mutation. Results: Among the 3 cardinal features of APECED, hypoparathyroidism has been already detected in all 15 patients, whereas Addison's disease and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis have so far been found in 10/15 and 12/15 cases, respectively. In 2 consanguineous cases, AIRE gene analysis revealed a novel mutation, named IVS13+2T, in homozygosis. R203X was the most common mutation in this region (30% of alleles and 46.6% of patients), followed by R257X (20% of alleles and 40% of patients). Conclusions: Sicilian APECED patients are confirmed to have some peculiar characteristics from a clinical and genetic point of view. No correlations between genotype and phenotype were identified. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

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