Australian Pork Ltd

Canberra, Australia

Australian Pork Ltd

Canberra, Australia
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D'Souza D.N.,Australian Pork Ltd | Blake B.L.,Western Australian Department of Agriculture and Food | Williams I.H.,University of Western Australia | Mullan B.P.,Western Australian Department of Agriculture and Food | And 2 more authors.
Animals | Year: 2015

Forty crossbred (Large White × Landrace × Duroc) female pigs (16.4 kg ± 0.94 kg) were used to investigate the effect of dietary lecithin supplementation on growth performance and pork quality. Pigs were randomly allocated to a commercial diet containing either 0, 3, 15 or 75 g lecithin/kg of feed during the grower and finisher growth phase. Pork from pigs consuming the diets containing 15 g and 75 g lecithin/kg had lower hardness (P < 0.001) and chewiness (P < 0.01) values compared to the controls. Dietary lecithin supplementation at 75 g/kg significantly increased (P < 0.05) the linoleic acid and reduced (P < 0.05) the myristic acid levels of pork compared to the control and the 3 g/kg and 15 g/kg lecithin supplemented treatments. Pigs fed the 75 g/kg lecithin supplemented diet had lower plasma cholesterol (P < 0.05) at slaughter compared to pigs fed the control diet and the 3 g/kg and 15 g/kg lecithin supplemented treatments. These data indicate that dietary lecithin supplementation has the potential to improve the quality attributes of pork from female pigs. © 2015 by the authors.


PubMed | Western Australian Department of Agriculture and Food, Australian Pork Ltd, Murdoch University, University of Western Australia and University of Melbourne
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Animals : an open access journal from MDPI | Year: 2015

Forty crossbred (Large White Landrace Duroc) female pigs (16.4 kg 0.94 kg) were used to investigate the effect of dietary lecithin supplementation on growth performance and pork quality. Pigs were randomly allocated to a commercial diet containing either 0, 3, 15 or 75 g lecithin/kg of feed during the grower and finisher growth phase. Pork from pigs consuming the diets containing 15 g and 75 g lecithin/kg had lower hardness ( P < 0.001) and chewiness ( P < 0.01) values compared to the controls. Dietary lecithin supplementation at 75 g/kg significantly increased ( P < 0.05) the linoleic acid and reduced ( P < 0.05) the myristic acid levels of pork compared to the control and the 3 g/kg and 15 g/kg lecithin supplemented treatments. Pigs fed the 75 g/kg lecithin supplemented diet had lower plasma cholesterol ( P < 0.05) at slaughter compared to pigs fed the control diet and the 3 g/kg and 15 g/kg lecithin supplemented treatments. These data indicate that dietary lecithin supplementation has the potential to improve the quality attributes of pork from female pigs.


D'Souza D.N.,Pork Research and Development Division | D'Souza D.N.,Australian Pork Ltd | Mullan B.P.,Pork Research and Development Division | Pethick D.W.,Murdoch University | And 2 more authors.
Animal Production Science | Year: 2012

Fifty crossbred (Large White × Landrace × Duroc) female finisher pigs were used to determine the effect of nutritional strategies on intramuscular fat content. The dietary treatments were (A) Control: commercial grower and finisher diet, (Day 68-166), (B) 15% P:E and vitamin A: a 15% reduced protein:energy grower diet with no supplemental vitamin A (Day 68110), followed by a commercial finisher diet (Day 111-166), (C) sugar: a grower diet supplemented with 10% sugar (Day 68-110), followed by a commercial finisher diet (Day 111-166), (D) zinc: a grower diet supplemented with 250 ppm zinc (Day 68-110), followed by a commercial finisher diet (Day 111-166), and (E) lecithin: a diet supplemented with 3 g/kg lecithin in the grower and finisher diet (Day 68-166). The effects of lecithin supplementation on compression characteristics of the M. semitendinosus were also studied. These data indicate that there were no significant effects of dietary manipulations on intramuscular fat content. During the grower phase (Day 68-110) pigs offered the low protein:energy and vitamin A-deficient diet had a poorer feed:gain compared with those offered diet containing supplemental sugar. Dietary lecithin supplementation decreased (P<0.05) hardness and chewiness values for the M. semitendinosus compared with pigs offered the Control diet. Pigs offered the lecithin-supplemented diet also tended (P = 0.090) to have lower cook loss compared with pigs offered the Control diet. Dietary zinc supplementation during the grower phase improved (P<0.05) the carcass dressing % compared with pigs offered the other diets. Dietary sugar or zinc increased (P<0.05) the amount of lean in the belly and may be a means to control the rapid rise in the ratio of fat to lean in the belly during the finisher phase. These data indicate that dietary lecithin supplementation has the potential to improve the tenderness of pork but that intramuscular fat is difficult to manipulate nutritionally from an already moderate amount. © 2012 CSIRO.


Moore K.L.,Bentley Delivery Center | Mullan B.P.,Bentley Delivery Center | Pluske J.R.,Murdoch University | Kim J.C.,Bentley Delivery Center | D'Souza D.N.,Australian Pork Ltd
Animal Feed Science and Technology | Year: 2011

Ninety individually-housed castrated pigs (Large White × Landrace × Duroc mixed crossbred, n= 18) were used in a randomized block experiment to determine the effect of yeast protein concentrate (YPC) or its major active components, nucleotides (NCL), inositol (INS), and glutamate (GLU), on pig performance, indices of gut structure and circulating measures of immune function. Daily gain and feed intake were not affected by diet, however pigs fed the YPC diet had a lower feed conversion ratio compared to those fed the control (CON), INS and NCL diets (P=0.028) in the feeding period. Villous height in the duodenum was increased in pigs that received the YPC diet compared to the CON and INS diets (P=0.029). In addition, immunoglobulin G levels were increased in pigs that received the INS and GLU diets compared to the CON and NCL diet on day 21 (P=0.034). These data suggest that although the effect was limited on the duodenal villous structure, pigs fed the YPC diet showed an improved duodenal villous height and the positive effect of YPC is most likely attributable to glutamate and nucleotides in the YPC. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | University Putra Malaysia, Australian Pork Ltd, Rivalea Australia Pty Ltd and University of Melbourne
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Meat science | Year: 2014

The influence of dietary lecithin at doses of 0, 4, 20 or 80 g/kg fed to finisher gilts for six weeks prior to slaughter on growth performance, carcass quality and pork quality was investigated. M. longissimus lumborum (loin) was removed from 36 pig carcasses at 24h post-mortem for Warner-Bratzler shear force, compression, collagen content and colour analyses. Dietary lecithin increased dressing percentage (P=0.009). Pork chewiness and collagen content were decreased by dietary lecithin (P<0.05, respectively), suggesting that improved chewiness may be due to decreased collagen content. However, dietary lecithin had no effect on shear force, cohesiveness or hardness (P>0.05, respectively). Dietary lecithin reduced loin muscle L* values and increased a* values (P<0.05, respectively) but no changes on b* values (P=0.56). The data showed that dietary lecithin improved dressing percentage and resulted in less chewy and less pale pork.


Moore K.L.,Bentley Delivery Center | Mullan B.P.,Bentley Delivery Center | D'Souza D.N.,Australian Pork Ltd
Meat Science | Year: 2012

Ninety six crossbred pigs were used in a 4. ×. 2. ×. 2 experiment to determine the influence of management strategy, moisture infusion and ageing on pork quality. The treatments were i) management strategy (MS) during the last 28. days pre-slaughter (Control: conventional diet; Ractopamine (Rac): porcine somatotropin (pST); and combined (Rac. +. pST): Rac for 28. days and pST for the final 14. days), ii) moisture infusion (MI) (0% and 10%) and iii) ageing period (24. h and 7. days). L * was decreased by pST and Rac. +. pST, followed by Rac and then the Control MS. Shear force was increased by Rac and Rac. +. pST but not by either pST or the Control MS. MI decreased L * and shear force while ageing for 7. days increased L * and yellowness, and decreased drip loss and WB shear force. MI or ageing for 7. days improved sensory pork quality. The results from this experiment indicated that as expected MI and ageing can be used to improve pork quality. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Channon H.A.,Australian Pork Ltd | Taverner M.R.,Taverner Minds | D'Souza D.N.,Australian Pork Ltd | Warner R.D.,CSIRO
Meat Science | Year: 2014

The effects of abattoir, carcase weight (60 or 80. kg HCW), hanging method (Achilles or aitchbone) and ageing period (2 or 7. day post-slaughter) on eating quality attributes of pork were investigated in this 3. ×. 2. ×. 2. ×. 2 factorial study. A total of 144 Large White. ×. Landrace female pigs were slaughtered at one of three abattoirs and sides hung from either the Achilles tendon or the aitchbone. After 24. h chilling, loin ( M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum) and topside ( M. semimembranosus) muscles were individually vacuum packaged and aged for 2 or 7. days post-slaughter. Consumers (n. = 852) evaluated eating quality. Neither abattoir nor carcase weight influenced tenderness, flavour or overall liking of pork. Improvements in tenderness, flavour and overall liking were found due to aitchbone hanging (P. <. 0.001) and ageing (P. <. 0.001) for 7. days compared with Achilles-hung carcases and pork aged for 2. days, respectively. This study demonstrated that aitchbone hanging and 7. day ageing can improve eating quality, but these effects were additive as the interaction term was not significant. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Channon H.A.,Australian Pork Ltd | Channon H.A.,University of Melbourne | Hamilton A.J.,University of Melbourne | D'Souza D.N.,Australian Pork Ltd | Dunshea F.R.,University of Melbourne
Meat Science | Year: 2016

Monte Carlo simulation was investigated as a potential methodology to estimate sensory tenderness, flavour and juiciness scores of pork following the implementation of key pathway interventions known to influence eating quality. Correction factors were established using mean data from published studies investigating key production, processing and cooking parameters. Probability distributions of correction factors were developed for single pathway parameters only, due to lack of interaction data. Except for moisture infusion, ageing period, aitchbone hanging and cooking pork to an internal temperature of >. 74 °C, only small shifts in the mean of the probability distributions of correction factors were observed for the majority of pathway parameters investigated in this study. Output distributions of sensory scores, generated from Monte Carlo simulations of input distributions of correction factors and for individual pigs, indicated that this methodology may be useful in estimating both the shift and variability in pork eating traits when different pathway interventions are applied. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Australian Pork Ltd
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Meat science | Year: 2013

The effects of abattoir, carcase weight (60 or 80 kg HCW), hanging method (Achilles or aitchbone) and ageing period (2 or 7 day post-slaughter) on eating quality attributes of pork were investigated in this 3222 factorial study. A total of 144 Large WhiteLandrace female pigs were slaughtered at one of three abattoirs and sides hung from either the Achilles tendon or the aitchbone. After 24 h chilling, loin (M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum) and topside (M. semimembranosus) muscles were individually vacuum packaged and aged for 2 or 7 days post-slaughter. Consumers (n=852) evaluated eating quality. Neither abattoir nor carcase weight influenced tenderness, flavour or overall liking of pork. Improvements in tenderness, flavour and overall liking were found due to aitchbone hanging (P<0.001) and ageing (P<0.001) for 7 days compared with Achilles-hung carcases and pork aged for 2 days, respectively. This study demonstrated that aitchbone hanging and 7 day ageing can improve eating quality, but these effects were additive as the interaction term was not significant.


PubMed | Australian Pork Ltd and University of Melbourne
Type: | Journal: Meat science | Year: 2016

Monte Carlo simulation was investigated as a potential methodology to estimate sensory tenderness, flavour and juiciness scores of pork following the implementation of key pathway interventions known to influence eating quality. Correction factors were established using mean data from published studies investigating key production, processing and cooking parameters. Probability distributions of correction factors were developed for single pathway parameters only, due to lack of interaction data. Except for moisture infusion, ageing period, aitchbone hanging and cooking pork to an internal temperature of >74C, only small shifts in the mean of the probability distributions of correction factors were observed for the majority of pathway parameters investigated in this study. Output distributions of sensory scores, generated from Monte Carlo simulations of input distributions of correction factors and for individual pigs, indicated that this methodology may be useful in estimating both the shift and variability in pork eating traits when different pathway interventions are applied.

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