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De Azambuja E.,Jules B | McCaskill-Stevens W.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | Francis P.,St Vincents Hospital | Francis P.,Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group | And 18 more authors.
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2010

Background: Obesity has been shown to be an indicator of poor prognosis for patients with primary breast cancer (BC) regardless of the use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Patients and methods: This is a retrospective analysis of 2,887 node-positive BC patients enrolled in the BIG 02-98 adjuvant study, a randomised phase III trial whose primary objective was to evaluate disease-free survival (DFS) by adding docetaxel to doxorubicin-based chemotherapy. In the current analysis, the effect of body mass index (BMI) on DFS and overall survival (OS) was assessed. BMI was obtained before the first cycle of chemotherapy. Obesity was defined as a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2. Results: In total 547 (19%) patients were obese at baseline, while 2,340 (81%) patients were non-obese. Estimated 5-year OS was 87.5% for non-obese and 82.9% for obese patients (HR 1.34; P = 0.013). Estimated 5-years DFS was 75.9% for non-obese and 70.0% for obese patients (HR 1.20; P = 0.041). In a multivariate model, obesity remained an independent prognostic factor for OS and DFS. Conclusions: In this study, obesity was associated with poorer outcome in node-positive BC patients. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide, more research on improving the treatment of obese BC patients is needed. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Ribi K.,Coordinating Center | Aldridge J.,Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Phillips K.-A.,University of Melbourne | Thompson A.,University of Dundee | And 18 more authors.
British Journal of Cancer | Year: 2012

Background: In the BIG 1-98 trial objective cognitive function improved in postmenopausal women 1 year after cessation of adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer. This report evaluates changes in subjective cognitive function (SCF). Methods: One hundred postmenopausal women, randomised to receive 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen, letrozole, or a sequence of the two, completed self-reported measures on SCF, psychological distress, fatigue, and quality of life during the fifth year of trial treatment (year 5) and 1 year after treatment completion (year 6). Changes between years 5 and 6 were evaluated using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Subjective cognitive function and its correlates were explored. Results: Subjective cognitive function and the other patient-reported outcomes did not change significantly after cessation of endocrine therapy with the exception of improvement for hot flushes (P=0.0005). No difference in changes was found between women taking tamoxifen or letrozole. Subjective cognitive function was the only psychosocial outcome with a substantial correlation between year 5 and 6 (Spearman's R0.80). Correlations between SCF and the other patient-reported outcomes were generally low. Conclusion: Improved objective cognitive function but not SCF occur following cessation of adjuvant endocrine therapy in the BIG 1-98 trial. The substantial correlation of SCF scores over time may represent a stable attribute. © 2012 Cancer Research UK. All rights reserved.


Chirgwin J.,Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group | Chirgwin J.,Monash University | Sun Z.,Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Smith I.,Royal Marsden Hospital | And 9 more authors.
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2012

Letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, is ineffective in the presence of ovarian estrogen production. Two subpopulations of apparently postmenopausal women might derive reduced benefit from letrozole due to residual or returning ovarian activity: younger women (who have the potential for residual subclinical ovarian estrogen production), and those with chemotherapy-induced menopause who may experience return of ovarian function. In these situations tamoxifen may be preferable to an aromatase inhibitor. Among 4,922 patients allocated to the monotherapy arms (5 years of letrozole or tamoxifen) in the BIG 1-98 trial we identified two relevant subpopulations: patients with potential residual ovarian function, defined as having natural menopause, treated without adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy and age ≤55 years (n = 641); and those with chemotherapy-induced menopause (n = 105). Neither of the subpopulations examined showed treatment effects differing from the trial population as a whole (interaction P values are 0.23 and 0.62, respectively). Indeed, both among the 641 patients aged ≤55 years with natural menopause and no chemotherapy (HR 0.77 [0.51, 1.16]) and among the 105 patients with chemotherapy-induced menopause (HR 0.51 [0.19, 1.39]), the disease-free survival (DFS) point estimate favoring letrozole was marginally more beneficial than in the trial as a whole (HR 0.84 [0.74, 0.95]). Contrary to our initial concern, DFS results for young postmenopausal patients who did not receive chemotherapy and patients with chemotherapy-induced menopause parallel the letrozole benefit seen in the BIG 1-98 population as a whole. These data support the use of letrozole even in such patients. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Coates A.,Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group
Cancer Forum | Year: 2013

Breast cancer and its treatment have changed enormously over the last four decades. Most newly diagnosed patients will not die of breast cancer, and the burdens of treatment are substantially less than formerly. Biological understanding of breast cancer has increased at an exponential rate, and has yielded many new therapeutic options. Clinical trials, to which Australian groups have made major contributions, provide the evidence base to utilise these discoveries to provide more effective, less onerous therapies.


PubMed | Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group
Type: Clinical Trial, Phase III | Journal: Breast cancer research and treatment | Year: 2011

Letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, is ineffective in the presence of ovarian estrogen production. Two subpopulations of apparently postmenopausal women might derive reduced benefit from letrozole due to residual or returning ovarian activity: younger women (who have the potential for residual subclinical ovarian estrogen production), and those with chemotherapy-induced menopause who may experience return of ovarian function. In these situations tamoxifen may be preferable to an aromatase inhibitor. Among 4,922 patients allocated to the monotherapy arms (5 years of letrozole or tamoxifen) in the BIG 1-98 trial we identified two relevant subpopulations: patients with potential residual ovarian function, defined as having natural menopause, treated without adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy and age 55 years (n = 641); and those with chemotherapy-induced menopause (n = 105). Neither of the subpopulations examined showed treatment effects differing from the trial population as a whole (interaction P values are 0.23 and 0.62, respectively). Indeed, both among the 641 patients aged 55 years with natural menopause and no chemotherapy (HR 0.77 [0.51, 1.16]) and among the 105 patients with chemotherapy-induced menopause (HR 0.51 [0.19, 1.39]), the disease-free survival (DFS) point estimate favoring letrozole was marginally more beneficial than in the trial as a whole (HR 0.84 [0.74, 0.95]). Contrary to our initial concern, DFS results for young postmenopausal patients who did not receive chemotherapy and patients with chemotherapy-induced menopause parallel the letrozole benefit seen in the BIG 1-98 population as a whole. These data support the use of letrozole even in such patients.

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