Sydney, Australia
Sydney, Australia

The Australian Federal Police is the federal police agency of the Commonwealth of Australia. Although the AFP was created by the amalgamation in 1979 of three Commonwealth law enforcement agencies, it traces its history from Commonwealth law enforcement agencies dating back to the federation of Australia's six precursor British self-governing colonies in 1901.The role of the AFP is to enforce Commonwealth of Australia criminal law and to protect Commonwealth and national interests from crime in Australia and overseas. The AFP is Australia's international law enforcement and policing representative, and the Government's chief source of advice on policing issues.Since 7 September 2009, the Commissioner of the Australian Federal Police has been Mr Tony Negus, who was sworn in following the retirement of the previous commissioner, Mick Keelty. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: phys.org

Australian Federal Police Commissioner Andrew Colvin revealed the first known breach of the laws, which were passed by Parliament in March 2015 despite widespread privacy concerns. The laws force Australian communication companies and internet providers to store customers' personal metadata, such as phone numbers called and websites accessed, for at least two years as a counterterrorism measure for the convenience of law enforcement agencies. A police officer investigating a police leak failed to get a warrant earlier this year before accessing the phone records of a journalist who reported the leak, Colvin said. The journalist involved was not told of the breach because the investigation was ongoing, Colvin said. Police destroyed all the evidence gathered as a result of the breach and advised the Commonwealth Ombudsman, a watchdog that investigates complaints from the public of unreasonable treatment by government agencies, Colvin said. The ombudsman will launch an investigation of the breach next week. Colvin said the investigator had not been aware that before accessing a journalist's phone records to identify a source, police must get a federal judge to issue a Journalist Information Warrant. Such warrants are an added safeguard in the legislation in recognition of journalists' obligation to protect sources. "Clearly they can't un-see it," Colvin said of the illegally obtained phone records. "They'll need to consider in terms of next steps of the investigation what weight they put on what they saw." Colvin would not say whether police would now seek a warrant. But he said Australian Federal Police have never applied for such a warrant since the new laws came into force. "Put simply, this was human error. It should not have occurred," Colvin said. "I don't think that gives cause to say that the public should have their confidence shattered in the system." The minor Greens party, which voted against the legislation, said the breach illustrated numerous flaws in the "mass-surveillance laws." "A scheme that was forced on to the public as a counterterror tool was instead used in exactly the way we've long feared—in pursuit of a journalist and their source," Greens Sen. Scott Ludlam said in a statement. The Australian Security Intelligence Organization, the country's main spy agency, does not have to apply to a court for a Journalist Information Warrant. They can apply for one through a secret process from the attorney general. The organization's director-general, Duncan Lewis, told a Senate committee in March that "a small number" of the warrants had been issued under the new laws. Explore further: Australian laws on storing phone, Internet records to change


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

(AP) — Australian police revealed on Friday that an officer broke the country's contentious new metadata laws by illegally accessing a journalist's phone records to identify an anonymous source. Australian Federal Police Commissioner Andrew Colvin revealed the first known breach of the laws, which were passed by Parliament in March 2015 despite widespread privacy concerns. The laws force Australian communication companies and internet providers to store customers' personal metadata, such as phone numbers called and websites accessed, for at least two years as a counterterrorism measure for the convenience of law enforcement agencies. A police officer investigating a police leak failed to get a warrant earlier this year before accessing the phone records of a journalist who reported the leak, Colvin said. The journalist involved was not told of the breach because the investigation was ongoing, Colvin said. Police destroyed all the evidence gathered as a result of the breach and advised the Commonwealth Ombudsman, a watchdog that investigates complaints from the public of unreasonable treatment by government agencies, Colvin said. The ombudsman will launch an investigation of the breach next week. Colvin said the investigator had not been aware that before accessing a journalist's phone records to identify a source, police must get a federal judge to issue a Journalist Information Warrant. Such warrants are an added safeguard in the legislation in recognition of journalists' obligation to protect sources. "Clearly they can't un-see it," Colvin said of the illegally obtained phone records. "They'll need to consider in terms of next steps of the investigation what weight they put on what they saw." Colvin would not say whether police would now seek a warrant. But he said Australian Federal Police have never applied for such a warrant since the new laws came into force. "Put simply, this was human error. It should not have occurred," Colvin said. "I don't think that gives cause to say that the public should have their confidence shattered in the system." The minor Greens party, which voted against the legislation, said the breach illustrated numerous flaws in the "mass-surveillance laws." "A scheme that was forced on to the public as a counterterror tool was instead used in exactly the way we've long feared — in pursuit of a journalist and their source," Greens Sen. Scott Ludlam said in a statement. The Australian Security Intelligence Organization, the country's main spy agency, does not have to apply to a court for a Journalist Information Warrant. They can apply for one through a secret process from the attorney general. The organization's director-general, Duncan Lewis, told a Senate committee in March that "a small number" of the warrants had been issued under the new laws.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Australia's top police agency has been forced to make an embarrassing admission, revealing that Australia has had its first (reported) metadata breach. And it came at the hands of an Australian Federal Police officer. The AFP today revealed one of its officers "illegally" accessed the metadata of an Australian journalist's phone calls "earlier this year." The breach was "identified by the AFP as a result of our own review," AFP Commissioner Andrew Colvin said. Colvin said that police destroyed all data once it was clear they had breached the law and that data did not form part of any police investigations. "Put simply, this was human error," he said. "It should not have occurred." Australia's mandatory data-retention law passed with bipartisan support in March 2015. Under the law, internet service providers and telecommunication companies are required to store metadata about customer communications, including names, addresses and the time, location and duration of communications, for two years. The laws also include provisions requiring police to get a warrant to access journalists' metadata. The provision of the Journalist Metadata Access Warrants was made to expedite passage of the metadata legislation and to appease media organisations concerned about data retention encroaching on press freedoms and the confidentiality of sources. However, under the warrant provision, journalists are not notified if their metadata is accessed. Today, the AFP revealed that it failed to secure a warrant in this case, resulting in Australia's first metadata breach being reported months after the fact. Still, Colvin rejected suggestions that the breach represented a failure of the system. "It's extremely rare that we're interested in a journalist's metadata," said Colvin. "We have breached in respect to a journalist's particular circumstances on this occasion," he added. "I don't think that gives cause to say that the public should have their confidence shattered in the system." The spectre of a major data breach has been looming, with critics warning that creating a trove of metadata on every single Australian with a phone or an internet connection is a recipe for a major hack. "The internet is a very busy place for people that choose to do harm," Michael Burgess, chief information security officer of Australia's largest carrier, Telstra, said in 2015. "We would have to put extra measures in place ... to make sure that data was safe from those that should not have access to it." This "honeypot" of metadata not only represents a potential lure for hackers but also leaves telecommunications companies open to potential data breaches as the result of human error. The newly confirmed breach comes just two weeks after the law officially came into effect. Originally introduced to parliament under the banner of national security concerns and curbing paedophilia and drug crime, critics were quick to frame the debate around questions of mass surveillance, access to the stored data and its use in civil cases, such as the prosecution of piracy. The first such instance of scope creep occurred in May 2015, when, after insistence from the Australian government that the bill would limit the number of enforcement agencies with access to metadata, it granted access to the Australian Border Force immigration body. Life, Disrupted: In Europe, millions of refugees are still searching for a safe place to settle. Tech should be part of the solution. But is it? CNET investigates. Does the Mac still matter? Apple execs tell why the MacBook Pro was over four years in the making, and why we should care.


More and more cruise ships figure in what can be called an environmental disaster, leaving in their wake damaged coral ecosystems that will take decades to recover. The most recent of which involves a ship owned by a small British cruise company. It smashed into the pristine coral reefs off Indonesia on March 4. The MS Caledonian's GPS and radar system were of no help when it sailed on shallow waters and smashed into the 17,222 square feet of coral reefs in Raja Ampat. "A tugboat ... was deployed to help refloat the cruise ship, which is something that shouldn't have happened because it damaged the reef even worse," Ricardo Tapilatu, head of University of Papua's Research Center for Pacific Marine Resources, said. Human-caused destruction ranks along with global warming and ocean acidification as threats that endanger the existence of coral reefs worldwide. Several incidents in the past involved cruise and cargo ships destroying coral reefs by smashing into them or running aground. In April 2010, the Australian Federal Police took into its custody a Chinese cargo ship after it ran aground in Douglas Shoal at the Great Barrier Reef. Before it, the massive coral reef suffered at least three major ship groundings. That same year in August, two container vessels collided off Mumbai in India, causing an oil spill and damaging mangroves along with marine life. Eight days later, a cargo ship ran into the coral reef near off the Kavaratti Island in Lakshadweep. Cruise ship anchors had caused irreparable damage to some 300 acres of coral reef in George Town, Grand Cayman. In another incident, around 80 percent of the coral reef in Cancun, Mexico was destroyed by a Norwegian cruise ship. With thousands of tourists aboard the cruise ships, the sheer volume of raw sewage and garbage directly dumped into the sea contributes to the deterioration of marine life and the whole ecosystem. A lot of food and drinks served to the guests of cruise ships will result in 25,000 gallons of daily sewage from their toilets, and some 170,000 gallons of toxic water from cruise ship sinks, showers, and laundry in addition to shampoos, detergents, and pesticides. Among the measures being explored to preserve the coral reefs include the expansion of the marine protected areas, the installation of an advanced waste treatment system, and garbage management. Environmental group Friends of the Earth found that most of the modern cruise ships lack an advanced waste treatment system. The group urged the installation of the system but was disregarded by the Cruise Line International Association. By law, large ships are not allowed to dump their sewage within 7 kilometers (4.3 miles) from the nearest coastline. The Florida Keys National Maritime Sanctuary pioneered the installation of mooring buoys to replace boat anchors that could damage coral reefs. These buoys contain information to assist navigation in regulated areas. Also, the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations for Virgin Islands National Park mandates that no ship is allowed to attach a rope or wire or to place an anchor to any coral reef structure to avoid the vessel from smashing it. Indeed, as the old adage says, "An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure." © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | March 10, 2016
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Troy Hunt, who runs Have I Been Pwned? Photo courtesy Troy Hunt The staggering amount of hacked data includes information sourced from 91 different websites that were compromised by hackers, including Adobe (152,445,165 accounts), Snapchat (4,609,615 accounts), and YouPorn (1,327,567 accounts). But, as you may already know, Hunt doesn't distribute or sell this data. Instead, it's the backbone of Have I Been Pwned (HIBP), a website dedicated to informing victims of data breaches. (“Pwned,” in case you're not familiar, is a slang term for being hacked, or otherwise having your digital security compromised.) The idea is simple enough: enter your email into HIPB, verify that you control it, and then the site will let search through its hundreds of millions of records, and return results of any breaches you've been swept up in. Potential victims will also be notified if their email address appears in any future dumps that Hunt obtains. Although many of the original data breaches include even more sensitive information like credit card information and passwords, Hunt only saves the user names and email addresses, so that people can find out whether they’ve been affected in a data breach. Around 10,000 people visit HIBP every day, and 350,000 people have subscribed to getting an email notification if their information appears in a new breach. Hunt started the site back in late 2013. At the time, Hunt, an Australian web security expert, was analyzing trends in data breaches, such as the common reuse of passwords across different dumps. He got the idea after noticing how many massive data breaches affect large numbers of people—people who may have had no idea they’d been compromised. “Probably the main catalyst was Adobe,” Hunt said. In October 2013, 153 million Adobe accounts, including email addresses, usernames, hashed passwords and plain text password hints were breached. But naturally, Adobe wasn't the only large dump circulating around that time: breaches from Gawker, Yahoo, and Sony were all being traded too. “I started to wonder how many people are actually aware of jut how broad this web is spreading, and how many places their data is now exposed,” Hunt said. With that, he starting putting together the pieces for HIBP, and wrote the first version in the middle of a flight. Data breaches are incredibly common today. If someone is victimized, they are at risk of hackers logging into accounts, the theft of financial information, and more besides. And often, companies don’t notify their customers of a breach until long after it’s happened, leaving them even more vulnerable to attacks. If a victim is aware of the breach as soon as it happens, they can at least reset their credentials or be more vigilant to protect themselves. “I want the people to be aware that they probably need to change their password, and they need to look out for unusual credit inquires,” Hunt said. How Hunt gets that data varies from case to case. Sometimes, a public-facing individual who has come across the dump will send it Hunt's way; other times, someone involved in the illegal trading of stolen data will forward a copy. “There is a massive trade in stolen data,” Hunt said, liking it to the collection of baseball cards. These people might not necessarily have any malicious interest in the data itself, but simply collect, swap and archive data sets. “Sometimes it takes four, five years before data either comes my way, or just begins to be broadly circulated,” Hunt said. But sometimes the hackers who carried out the breach will contact Hunt directly and provide newly obtained data. “Frankly, it pisses me off when I hear from these guys,” said Hunt, who wants to ask the hackers, “What is wrong with you?” “Running this service exposes me to the shadier side of the web, and consequentially some shady people,” he said. On the face of it, a hacker obtaining a dump, and then sending it to Hunt who plans to allow people to check its contents for free is pretty counterintuitive. But hackers are pulled by all sorts of different motivations, be those for ideology or fame as well as cash. The site includes breaches from Forbes, Comcast, and Patreon, and even more personal services, such as AdultFriendFinder, YouPorn, and extra-marital affairs site Ashley Madison. The publication of gigabytes of user data from Ashley Madison stood out to Hunt as particularly damaging. “I don't think we've seen another breach where people have killed themselves as a result of it,” he said. The records of some 30 million user accounts were dumped online in 2015. Another stand-out breach for Hunt was VTech, the Hong Kong toy company, which not only contained account information, but photos of children too. “I haven't seen [another] data breach that impacted kids that way,” Hunt added. There have been data breaches that Hunt has decided not to host, however. “Other times I've outright said no, or I've reported it to the companies,” he said. One of those was from a Dutch financial system that facilitated transactions between banks. Hunt received the data, got in touch with the affected company, and suggested they inform their customers. One reason for this was because of possible legal ramifications. “I want to be able to keep this service running, and I don't want to step on the wrong side of an organization, such that one of them gets a bee in their bonnet, and then takes legal action,” Hunt said. In a case like that, he wouldn't want the company first learning of the serious breach via a public posting on HIBP. To date, Hunt hasn't faced any legal action because of his site, but law enforcement have asked him for more information about what exactly was contained in a specific breach. “I've had queries from FBI, Australian Federal Police, other law enforcement, legal professionals wanting to mount class actions: none of these, in any way [were] upset with what I'm doing with haveibeenpwned, but most of them [wanted] to understand more about the data,” he continued. As for what he has learned from years of collating breaches, Hunt says it's the free or cheap sites in particular that have exhibited really rubbish security over the years. “There can be no way that those who manage the software development in these organizations, are not aware,” of the myriad of breaches that are going on, everyday, all around the web, Hunt said. “Tomorrow it will be someone else, in exactly the same boat. It just frustrates me enormously.”


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

When ecstasy hits, it unleashes a rush of euphoria and abundant compassion in users. That's precisely why the drug could be an effective treatment for people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), early studies show. A large-scale clinical trial is set to move forward next year to test the therapeutic benefits of MDMA—a.k.a. ecstasy, or molly—in survivors of war combat, sexual assault, violent crimes and other traumatic experiences. SEE ALSO: New artificial intelligence technique could erase fear from your brain This week, the Food and Drug Administration said researchers could move ahead with the trial after a series of smaller trials proved successful. The bigger Phase 3 trial could pave the way for the agency to approve ecstasy as a legal drug within a few years. "It changed my life," C.J. Hardin, a U.S. Army veteran who served three tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, told the New York Times. "It allowed me to see my trauma without fear or hesitation and finally process things and move forward," he said. Hardin participated in an earlier clinical trial in South Carolina that combined weeks of psychotherapy with limited doses of MDMA, administered under a psychiatrist's guidance. The Phase 3 trial could follow a similar approach, and include hundreds more patients. Like so many street drugs, ecstasy use comes with (and is also known for) a wide array of health risks, like high fevers, liver failure, cardiac arrest or brain damage. But the drug remains popular among recreational users for its "prosocial" effects—the increased sensations of friendliness, affection and trust. Studies of MDMA's effects on the brain show the drug triggers the release of a hormone called oxytocin, thought to bring about those prosocial feelings. Ecstasy may also tamp down feelings like fear or threat, by weakening activity in the brain's amygdala region. Two 2014 studies found that MDMA reduced subjects' abilities to perceive negative emotional states in other people. Not only that, but the drug also made participants less bothered by social rejection. Like MDMA, PTSD also significantly alters brain activity—but in a completely different way. Traumatic stress can cause increased activity in the fear-stoking amygdala region, studies show. It also interferes with neurochemical systems that moderate stress and affect memory functions. By combining MDMA with therapy, patients can quiet their disabling fears and explore the root of their trauma in a more productive way, said Brad Burge, communications director for the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, a small nonprofit funding MDMA clinical trials. "When people are processing extremely difficult or fearful emotions, as is the case with PTSD, it can be very helpful in allowing people to clearly describe what they're experiencing," he told Mashable by phone from Santa Cruz, California. Hardin, the U.S. veteran, said ecstasy helped him climb out of a world marked by sleepless nights and dreams of explosions and death. "The MDMA sessions showed me a light I could move toward," he told the Times from his home in Charleston, South Carolina. Ann and Michael Mithoefer, a wife-and-husband team leading clinical trials in South Carolina, said they found a combination of non-drug therapy sessions and drug-assisted sessions together reduced a range of negative symptoms in their patients. In one trial, the patients reported a 56 percent drop in the severity of symptoms like general anxiety, depression and nightmares. At the end of the study, two-thirds of patients no longer met the criteria for having PTSD, according to the Mithoefers' research published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.  Follow-up exams with patients found the improvements lasted over more than a year after therapy. The trail was one of six Phase 2 studies backed by the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies. Burge said that among the 106 total participants, 66 percent no longer had PTSD by the end of the trial. Australian Federal Police in 2005 display more than one ton of MDMA (ecstasy) pills seized from Melbourne's waterfront. The association as of now is the only U.S. organization driving clinical research in MDMA for therapeutic use in PTSD.  The drug first from the labs of German drug manufacturer Merck in the 1910s. In the following decades, researchers—included the U.S. Army in the 1950s—explored the synthetic drug's potential uses in psychotherapy and psychiatry. But when ecstasy became a popular club drug in the 1980s and 90s, governments worldwide cracked down. U.S. regulators in 1985 placed the pill on a list of prohibited substances that included heroin and LSD. The association was created that same year. Burge said the organization needs to raise at least $20 million to support three to four years of Phase 3 trials. A chunk of that money will go toward paying a drug manufacturer to make pharmaceutical-grade MDMA for the research. He said he expects the FDA to formally green-light the Phase 3 trial in early 2017, and potentially approve the drug for prescription use by 2021. "We see a very clear path ahead," Burge said. "More people are realizing that we need better approaches to the treatment of PTSD. That's contributed to more [societal] openness toward this research." Medical experts who spoke with the Times said they were hopeful out the upcoming clinical trials but remained wary of the potential for drug abuse. After all, opioid painkillers like OxyContin are prescription drugs. And the U.S. is now suffering an . "It's a feel-good drug, and we know people are prone to abuse it," Dr. Charles R. Marmar, the head of psychiatry at New York University’s Langone School of Medicine, told the newspaper. Marmar is a leading PTSD researcher and was not involved in the study. And of course, prolonged use of ecstasy might harm the brain, several studies have shown. A found that long-term users risk damaging their brain structure and developing significant memory problems. Another in 2013 found long-term ecstasy use may alter brain activation in regions that affect verbal memory. Still, Marmar said it "will be of great use" if the clinical studies show positive results. "PTSD can be very hard to treat," he told the Times. "Our best therapies right now don't help 30 to 40 percent of people. So we need more options."


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

MELBOURNE, Australia, Feb. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- According to a joint media release from the Australian Federal Police (AFP) and the Australian Border Force (ABF), US$186 million worth of drugs was seized in Melbourne on Feb. 5, and four men were arrested in relation to the case. Nuctech's Relocatable Container/Vehicle Inspection System, which had just recently been upgraded, was instrumental in helping officials detect the contraband. It is the first time that one of Nuctech's high gradient accelerators has been used in container/vehicle inspection systems. A shipping container from South Africa was found to have abnormalities during a routine check by ABF officers in Melbourne. The container was declared to be carrying mining equipment, but the scanning image clearly showed that there was something suspicious inside one of the machines. It was then passed on for an intrusive check, and 254 kg of cocaine and 104 kg of methamphetamine were found concealed in 358 packages within an iron ore extractor covered with activated charcoal. While praising the officers and staff at the Melbourne Container Examination Facility for the seizure, ABF Regional Commander Victoria and Tasmania, James Watson, stated, "Our officers have the expertise and technology to detect even the most sophisticated concealment. In this instance, our upgraded container x-ray technology has been able to penetrate through several layers of steel, machinery and coal/stones to identify these concealed packages." The full press release can be read here: https://www.afp.gov.au/news-media/media-releases/four-arrested-allegedly-importing-254-kg-cocaine-and-104-kg-meth The cooperation between Nuctech and the Australian General Administration of Customs started in 2001 when Nuctech signed an export contract with Australian Customs for the Relocatable Container/Vehicle Inspection System. This was Nuctech's breakthrough into the overseas market. The machines are delivered in 2002 and have run smoothly since then. In the years since then, Nuctech has continued to work closely with Australian Customs while continuing to work hard on R&D. New technologies and functions are constantly being developed, and with a comprehensive understanding of our customer's needs, customized solutions are made. In 2009 and 2016, technical upgrades made to the systems serving Australian Customs. The upgrades have turned the single-energy machines into dual-energy ones, and made them more powerful and user-friendly. Equipped with new accelerators and detectors, the systems now have stronger penetration power, and higher image resolution. Last year, Nuctech's Computed Tomography Inspection Systems and Central Image Gallery Systems were adopted by Australian Customs, and this undoubtedly marks a renewing of the cooperation between Nuctech and Australian Customs. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nuctech-helps-to-seize-us186-million-worth-of-drugs-in-australia-300412337.html


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A former sergeant of the Australian Federal Police (AFP) and an officer in the Australian Army Reserve, Lisa Ride was diagnosed with Parkinson’s and found that life took her in a new direction. The result is a book of 22 poems titled “A Little Spot of Poetry” (published by Xlibris AU). Uniquely Australian, this book tells Ride’s story through bush poetry. Her poems introduce readers to life in the country town of Albury on the beautiful Murray River in New South Wales. Surrounded by wineries and the breathtaking bush of the high country, they will learn about barramundi, currawongs, towneys and more. Along the way, Dottie her cartoon character comes too. Ride’s quirky take on life is artfully interwoven through her poetry, in the same way the bush poets of times gone by would do. An excerpt from the book: I put it in a safe place, I know I put it there When I went to find it, it had vanished in thin air It’s like I’m in the Twilight Zone; I can’t seem to get things right And it really doesn’t help me that I toss and turn all night An insightful and rewarding read, “A Little Spot of Poetry” is a snap-shot of one woman’s view of today’s society and gives comment on many levels. The author hopes readers will find this book a journey they can enjoy. “A Little Spot of Poetry” By Lisa Ride Softcover | 8.5x11in | 62 pages | ISBN 9781514494080 E-Book | 62 pages | ISBN 9781514494097 Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble About the Author Lisa Ride was born in the capital of Australia, Canberra, in 1962 and was a student at both Garran Primary School and Canberra Girls Grammar. A former uniformed police sergeant with the Australian Federal Police (AFP 1981-1995) and an Army Reserve officer (1981-2016) she has a background in public relations and has been a media liaison officer for the AFP, Australian National University and Defence (Army). She was a Marriage Celebrant for ten years (2004-2014) on the border town of Albury NSW. She is a quilter and makes quilts of soldiers deployed overseas; she loves singing (alto) and is an avid collector of many things. Xlibris Publishing Australia, an Author Solutions, LLC imprint, is a self-publishing services provider dedicated to serving Australian authors. By focusing on the needs of creative writers and artists and adopting the latest print-on-demand publishing technology and strategies, we provide expert publishing services with direct and personal access to quality publication in hardcover, trade paperback, custom leather-bound and full-color formats. To date, Xlibris has helped to publish more than 60,000 titles.For more information, visit xlibrispublishing.com.au or call 1800 455 039 to receive a free publishing guide. Follow us @XlibrisAus on Twitter for the latest news.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

MELBOURNE, Australia, Feb. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- According to a joint media release from the Australian Federal Police (AFP) and the Australian Border Force (ABF), US$186 million worth of drugs was seized in Melbourne on Feb. 5, and four men were arrested in relation to the case....


News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull speaks as the Federal Minister for Justice Michael Keenan and the Australian Federal Police Commissioner Andrew Colvin listen on during a media conference in Sydney, Australia, December 23, 2016 regarding a plot to attack prominent sites in the city of Melbourne with a series of bombs on Christmas Day that authorities described as "an imminent terrorist event" inspired by Islamic State. REUTERS/David Gray CANBERRA, Australia (AP) -- Police in Australia have detained five men suspected of planning a series of Christmas Day bomb attacks in the heart of the country's second-largest city, officials said Friday. The suspects had been inspired by the Islamic State group and planned attacks on Melbourne's Flinders Street train station, neighboring Federation Square and St. Paul's Cathedral, Victoria state Police Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton said. The arrests came after a truck smashed into a Christmas market in Berlin on Monday, killing 12 people. A manhunt is underway for the person behind that attack, which prompted increases in security around the world. Two of seven people initially arrested in raids Thursday night and Friday morning in Melbourne — a 26-year-old man and a 20-year-old woman — were released without being charged, police said. Five men between the ages 21 and 26 remained in custody and would be charged later Friday with preparing a terrorist attack. They were not identified but police said four were born in Australia and the fifth was Egyptian-born with Egyptian and Australian citizenship. Police had been watching the alleged plotters for some time, and believed they were preparing to use explosives, knives and a gun, Ashton said. Police believed the threat had been neutralized through the raids on five Melbourne premises, he said. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said: "This is one of the most substantial terrorist plots that have been disrupted over the last several years." "Islamist terrorism is a global challenge that affects us all. But we must not be cowed by the terrorists," Turnbull told reporter. "We will continue to go about our lives as we always have. What these criminals seek to do is to kill. But they also seek to frighten us, to cow us into abandoning our Australian way of life. They want to frighten Australians. They want to divide Australians. They want us to turn on each other. We will not let them succeed," he added. Since Australia's terrorist threat level was elevated in September 2014, the government says there have been four extremist attacks and 12 plots foiled by police. Australian Federal Police Commissioner Andrew Colvin said the plotters had moved very quickly from a plan to develop a capability to attack. "In terms of events that we have seen over the past few years in Australia, this certainly concerns me more than any other event that I've seen," Colvin said. "We believe that we have removed the bulk of this particular cell, this group," he said. Victoria state Premier Daniel Andrews said there will be extra police on the streets of Melbourne on Christmas Day to make the public feel safe. About 400 police officers were involved in the raids. Ashton described those arrested as "self-radicalized" and inspired by Islamic State propaganda.

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