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Hoad K.E.,Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists | Hoad K.E.,Pathwest Royal Perth Hospital | Johnson L.A.,Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists | Johnson L.A.,Royal Brisbane Hospital | And 11 more authors.
Clinical Biochemistry | Year: 2013

Objectives: The RCPA Quality Assurance Program (RCPA QAP) offers monthly proficiency testing for vitamins A, B1, B6, β-carotene, C and E to laboratories worldwide. A review of the results submitted for the whole blood vitamin B1/B6 sub-program revealed a wide dispersion. Here we describe the results of a methodology survey for vitamins B1 and B6. Design and methods: A questionnaire was sent to thirteen laboratories. Eleven laboratories were returning QAP results for vitamin B1 (thiamine diphosphate) and five were returning results for vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate). Results: All nine respondents provided a clinical service for vitamins B1 and B6. HPLC with fluorescence detection was the most common method principle. For vitamin B1, six respondents used a commercial assay whilst three used in-house methods; whole blood was the matrix for all. For vitamin B6, five respondents used commercial assays and four used in-house assays. The choice of matrix for vitamin B6 varied with three respondents using whole blood and five using plasma for analysis. Sample preparation incorporated protein precipitation and derivatization steps. An internal standard was employed in sample preparation by only one survey respondent. Conclusions: The immediate result of this survey was the incorporation of plasma vitamin B6 into the RCPA QAP vitamin program. The absence of an internal standard in current vitamin B1 and B6 assays is a likely contributor to the wide dispersion of results seen in this program. We recommend kit manufacturers and laboratories investigate the inclusion of internal standards to correct the variability that may occur during processing. © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists.


PubMed | Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists, Sullivan Nicolaides Pathology, St Vincents Hospital, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Clinical biochemist. Reviews | Year: 2015

Surveys by the RCPA PITUS Project have shown significant variations in report rendering between Australasian Pathology Providers. The same project collected anecdotal evidence that this variation has led to the misunderstanding and misreading of results - a clinical safety issue. Recommendations are given for the rendering of reference limits on pathology reports, determination and rendering of result flags, and the documentation of sub-population partitions for reference intervals. These recommendations apply equally for paper or electronic reporting, but should not limit the use of novel techniques within electronic reports to convey additional meaning. PITUS Working Group 4 will publish draft recommendations for peer review and comment in relation to the above in the second half of 2014.


PubMed | Roche Holding AG, Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists, StVincents Hospital, Sonic Healthcare and 7 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Clinical biochemist. Reviews | Year: 2015

Scientific evidence supports the use of common reference intervals (RIs) for many general chemistry analytes, in particular those with sound calibration and traceability in place. Already the Nordic countries and United Kingdom have largely achieved harmonised RIs. Following a series of workshops organised by the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) between 2012 and 2014 at which an evidence-based approach for determination of common intervals was developed, pathology organisations in Australia and New Zealand have reached a scientific consensus on what adult and paediatric intervals we should use across Australasia. The aim of this report is to describe the processes that the AACB and the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia have taken towards recommending the implementation of a first panel of common RIs for use in Australasia.

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