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Clarksville, TN, United States

Austin Peay State University /ˈɔːstən pi/ is a four-year public university located in Clarksville, Tennessee, and operated by the Tennessee Board of Regents. The University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and is the fastest-growing university in Tennessee. Wikipedia.


Hershey K.,Austin Peay State University
Nursing Clinics of North America | Year: 2015

In this article, the principles behind high-reliability organizations and a culture of safety are explored. Three areas in which health care has the greatest potential for improvement in safety culture are also discussed: a nonpunitive response to error; handoffs and transitions; and safe staffing. Tools for frontline nurses to help improve their organization's culture of safety in these areas are reviewed. Information is also given for nurses responding to error, including participating in root-cause analysis and supporting health care workers involved in adverse events. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Source


Lim J.,Austin Peay State University
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication | Year: 2010

This study explores two primary dimensions of salience, such as attention and prominence, among coverage of four major online newspapers, which are NYTimes.com, USATODAY.com, washingtonpost.com, and LATimes.com. The four major online newspapers agree with not only issue agendas (attention of salience) but also story placement (prominence of salience). Specifically, NYTimes.com and washingtonpost.com post more important stories on the most visible areas of their major sections and publish less important stories on the bottom areas of the sections. This indicates the potentials of major online newspapers to influence other news media. Because news Web sites are major information sources, the convergence of attention and prominence is likely to affect public opinion. © 2010 International Communication Association. Source


The most important and effective measures against disease outbreaks in the absence of valid medicines or vaccine are quarantine and isolation strategies. In this paper optimal control theory is applied to a system of ordinary differential equation describing a two-strain avian influenza transmission via the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. To this end, a pair of control variables representing the isolation strategies for individuals with avian and mutant strains were incorporated into the transmission model. The infection averted ratio (IAR) and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) were calculated to investigate the cost-effectiveness of all possible combinations of the control strategies. The simulation results show that the implementation of the combination strategy during the epidemic is the most cost-effective strategy for avian influenza transmission. This is followed by the control strategy involving isolation of individuals with the mutant strain. Also observed was the fact that low mutating and more virulent virus results in an increased control effort of isolating individuals with the avian strain; and high mutating with more virulent virus results in increased efforts in isolating individuals with the mutant strain. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source


Agusto F.B.,Austin Peay State University | Gumel A.B.,University of Manitoba
Mathematical Biosciences | Year: 2013

A new deterministic model for the transmission dynamics of the lowly- and highly-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI and HPAI) strains is designed and rigorously analyzed. The model exhibits the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where a stable disease-free equilibrium co-exists with a stable endemic equilibrium whenever the associated reproduction number is less than unity. It is shown that the re-infection of birds infected with the LPAI strain causes the backward bifurcation phenomenon. In the absence of such re-infection, the disease-free equilibrium of the model is globally-asymptotically stable when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. Using non-linear Lyapunov functions of Goh-Volterra type, the LPAI-only and HPAI-only boundary equilibria of the model are shown to be globally-asymptotically stable when they exist. A special case of the model is shown to have a continuum of co-existence equilibria whenever the associated reproduction numbers of the two strains are equal and exceed unity. Furthermore, numerical simulations of the model suggest that co-existence or competitive exclusion of the two strains can occur when the respective reproduction numbers of the two strains exceed unity. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. Source


Agusto F.B.,Austin Peay State University
Bulletin of Mathematical Biology | Year: 2014

Human habitat connectivity, movement rates, and spatial heterogeneity have tremendous impact on malaria transmission. In this paper, a deterministic system of differential equations for malaria transmission incorporating human movements and the development of drug resistance malaria in an n patch system is presented. The disease-free equilibrium of the model is globally asymptotically stable when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. For a two patch case, the boundary equilibria (drug sensitive-only and drug resistance-only boundary equilibria) when there is no movement between the patches are shown to be locally asymptotically stable when they exist; the co-existence equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable whenever the reproduction number for the drug sensitive malaria is greater than the reproduction number for the resistance malaria. Furthermore, numerical simulations of the connected two patch model (when there is movement between the patches) suggest that co-existence or competitive exclusion of the two strains can occur when the respective reproduction numbers of the two strains exceed unity. With slow movement (or low migration) between the patches, the drug sensitive strain dominates the drug resistance strain. However, with fast movement (or high migration) between the patches, the drug resistance strain dominates the drug sensitive strain. © 2014 Society for Mathematical Biology. Source

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