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Goleta, CA, United States

Piels M.,University of California at Santa Barbara | Ramaswamy A.,Aurrion, Inc. | Bowers J.E.,University of California at Santa Barbara
Optics Express | Year: 2013

A new method of simulating photodiode nonlinearities is proposed. This model includes the effects of non-uniform absorption in three dimensions, self-heating, and is compatible with circuit components defined in the frequency domain, such as transmission lines. The saturated output power and third order output intercept points of two different waveguide photodiodes are simulated, with excellent agreement between measurement and theory. The technique is then used to provide guidance for the future design of linear waveguide-based photodetectors. © 2013 Optical Society of America.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1000.00K | Year: 2015

The interconnect networks of datacenters and extreme scale high performance computers (HPC) will require a bandwidth density, in terms of connections per area, that cannot practically be met with todays optical transceiver technology. The push for high-radix connectivity in combination with an ever increasing amount of data transported on these advanced networks requires increasing numbers of fiber connections which are projected to scale beyond what can be accommodated at the network switch front panel interface. To keep pace with big data and HPC, optical transceiver technologies must evolve from discrete component solutions with data channels transmitted over parallel fibers, to integrated photonic solutions which use wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) to transmit multiple, high data rate channels on a single fiber. In this way, cost-effective optical transceivers with unprecedented bandwidth densities can be realized to keep pace with the connectivity needs of datacenter and extreme scale HPC. In this program, Aurrion proposes to partner with IBM to develop low thermal-sensitivity, high bandwidth-density optical receivers which will enable the high speed (>100Gb/s) and high interconnectivity advanced network topologies that will be needed for datacenter and extreme scaling computing. Building on previous work where Aurrion and IBM demonstrated a single channel 60 Gb/s digital optical receiver, phase 1 will focus on developing an athermal WDM receiver design compatible its high speed photodiodes and IBM electronics. In subsequent phases, full receivers, incorporating the designed demultiplexors, photodiode arrays, and electronic drivers can be demonstrated. If successful, the technology developed in this program will be commercialized to address datacenter and HPC market needs.


Described herein are optical sensing devices for photonic integrated circuits (PICs). A PIC may comprise a plurality of waveguides formed in a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate, and a plurality of heterogeneous lasers, each laser formed from a silicon material of the SOI substrate and to emit an output wavelength comprising an infrared wavelength. Each of these lasers may comprise a resonant cavity included in one of the plurality of waveguides, and a gain material comprising a non-silicon material and adiabatically coupled to the respective waveguide. A light directing element may direct outputs of the plurality of heterogeneous lasers from the PIC towards an object, and one or more detectors may detect light from the plurality of heterogeneous lasers reflected from or transmitted through the object.


Patent
Aurrion, Inc. | Date: 2013-11-06

Embodiments of the invention describe wavelength stabilization of selective optical components (e.g., multiplexers, de-multiplexers) using optical mode steering. An additional waveguide structure is coupled to the free propagation region of the selective optical component; this additional waveguide structure moves a spatial position or a direction of a propagation of an optical mode at the free propagation region in order to adjust a wavelength response of the component. By moving the position or direction of the optical mode, the wavelength response of the component may be changed; in other words, by tuning the position or direction of the optical mode, a components wavelength/channel response is remapped to account for the mis-targeting (i.e., wavelength shift) related to a temperature change or a design/manufacturing defect.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.77K | Year: 2014

The interconnect networks of datacenters and extreme scale high performance computers (HPC) will require a bandwidth density, in terms of connections per area, that cannot practically be met with todays optical transceiver technology. The push for high-radix connectivity in combination with an ever increasing amount of data transported on these advanced networks requires increasing numbers of fiber connections which are projected to scale beyond what can be accommodated at the network switch front panel interface. To keep pace with big data and HPC, optical transceiver technologies must evolve from discrete component solutions with data channels transmitted over parallel fibers, to integrated photonic solutions which use wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) to transmit multiple, high data rate channels on a single fiber. In this way, cost-effective optical transceivers with unprecedented bandwidth densities can be realized to keep pace with the connectivity needs of datacenter and extreme scale HPC. In this program, Aurrion proposes to partner with IBM to develop low thermal-sensitivity, high bandwidth-density optical receivers which will enable the high speed ( & gt;100Gb/s) and high interconnectivity advanced network topologies that will be needed for datacenter and extreme scaling computing. Building on previous work where Aurrion and IBM demonstrated a single channel 60 Gb/s digital optical receiver, phase 1 will focus on developing an athermal WDM receiver design compatible its high speed photodiodes and IBM electronics. In subsequent phases, full receivers, incorporating the designed demultiplexors, photodiode arrays, and electronic drivers can be demonstrated. If successful, the technology developed in this program will be commercialized to address datacenter and HPC market needs.

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