KALAMAZOO, MI, United States
KALAMAZOO, MI, United States

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Suzuki J.Y.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Tripathi S.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Tripathi S.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Fermin G.A.,University of Los Andes, Venezuela | And 18 more authors.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2010

Transformation plasmid-derived insert number and insert site sequence in 55-1 line papaya derivatives Rainbow and SunUp was determined as part of a larger petition to allow its import into Japan (Suzuki et al., 2007, 2008). Three insertions were detected by Southern analysis and their corresponding sequences determined by clones (Fermín, 2002) or via the whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequence database of SunUp (Ming et al., 2008). All functional transgenes including the coat protein (CP) gene that confers resistance to PRSV, and visible and selectable marker genes, uidA encoding glucuronidase (GUS) and nptII encoding neomycin phosphotransferase II were found in a single 9,789 basepair (bp) insert referred to as the functional transgene. The two other insertion sites consisted of a 290 bp nonfunctional sequence of the nptII gene and a 1,533 bp plasmid-derived fragment containing a nonfunctional 222 bp segment of the tetA gene. Detection of the same three inserts in Rainbow and in samples of SunUp representing transgenic generations five to eight (R5 to R8) suggests that the inserts are stable. Five out of the six genomic DNA segments flanking the three inserts were nuclear plastid sequences (nupts). No changes to endogenous gene function based on sequence structure of the transformation plasmid DNA insertion sites could be determined and no allergenic or toxic proteins were predicted from analysis of the insertion site and flanking genomic DNA. These results should support a positive review of the petition to allow the import and consumption of Rainbow and its derivatives in Japan, which is currently in its final stages. Export of Rainbow papaya to Japan will greatly benefit the local papaya industry in Hawaii and will provide a case for testing consumer acceptance of genetically engineered fresh products in Japan.


Wuts P.G.M.,Kalexsyn Inc. | Simons L.J.,Kalexsyn Inc. | Metzger B.P.,Aureogen Biosciences, Inc. | Sterling R.C.,Aureogen Biosciences, Inc. | And 2 more authors.
ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters | Year: 2015

The natural product aureobasidin A (AbA) is a potent, well-tolerated antifungal agent with robust efficacy in animals. Although native AbA is active against a number of fungi, it has little activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, an important human pathogen, and attempts to improve the activity against this organism by structural modifications have to date involved chemistries too complex for continued development. This report describes novel chemistry for the modification of AbA. The key step involves functionalization of the phenylalanine residues in the compound by iridium-catalyzed borylation. This is followed by displacement of the pinacol boron moiety to form the corresponding bromide or iodide and substitution by Suzuki biaryl coupling. The approach allows for synthesis of a truly wide range of derivatives and has produced compounds with A. fumigatus minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of <0.5 μg/mL. The approach is readily adaptable to large-scale synthesis and industrial production. © 2015 American Chemical Society.


PubMed | Aureogen Biosciences, Inc. and Kalexsyn Inc.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: ACS medicinal chemistry letters | Year: 2015

The natural product aureobasidin A (AbA) is a potent, well-tolerated antifungal agent with robust efficacy in animals. Although native AbA is active against a number of fungi, it has little activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, an important human pathogen, and attempts to improve the activity against this organism by structural modifications have to date involved chemistries too complex for continued development. This report describes novel chemistry for the modification of AbA. The key step involves functionalization of the phenylalanine residues in the compound by iridium-catalyzed borylation. This is followed by displacement of the pinacol boron moiety to form the corresponding bromide or iodide and substitution by Suzuki biaryl coupling. The approach allows for synthesis of a truly wide range of derivatives and has produced compounds with A. fumigatus minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of <0.5 g/mL. The approach is readily adaptable to large-scale synthesis and industrial production.


Patent
Aureogen Biosciences, Inc. | Date: 2012-03-23

In general, the invention relates to methods of synthesizing AbA derivatives that are useful for treating infection and amenable to further chemical elaboration. These novel methods are scalable for industrial production and employ safer, simpler, and more efficient process conditions. Furthermore, the invention also provides novel compounds and intermediates useful for implementing the methods described herein and/or for the treatment of infection.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 481.48K | Year: 2011

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The continuing increase in the number of surgery, transplantation, cancer and other immunocompromized patients, that need treatment for fungal infections, together with the fact that only one new class of antifungal therapeutics has been introduced to the market in over 30 years has created an immediate need for new and better antifungal drugs with novel modes of action (MoA). The natural product compound Aureobasidin A (AbA) is a potent, fungicidal drug with a novel MoA that also does not elicit resistant pathogen strains. Unfortunately, although efficacious and very well tolerated, native AbA's target spectrum is too narrow to be clinically attractive. Of the two major human pathogens, Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., AbA only has efficacy against Candida. However, exploratory synthetic chemistry work has demonstrated that structural modifications can convert native AbA into compounds that have close to equal efficacy against both pathogens. The required chemistry, however, is complicated and expensive, to the extent that it constitutes a barrier against development of these compounds into commercial products. The overall goal of the project outlined in this proposal is to use a novel genetic engineering approach to introduce the structural modifications required to confer Aspergillus spp. activity to AbA, thereby avoiding the high cost of synthetic chemistry and allow commercialization of an efficacious, well tolerated antifungal drug with a novel MoA. In Phase I, the gene, aba 1, encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) complex responsible for synthesis of AbA in the producer organism was identified, cloned, sequenced and mapped. Phase II has to date produced methodologies and a set of genetic tools thatallow efficient engineering of the aba 1 gene. Also accomplished to date is the successful engineering of the aba 1 gene, the generation of engineered strains producing structurally modified AbA molecules and the generation of significant new data on the unique properties of fungal NRPS complexes. Production of structurally altered cyclic peptides by engineering of a fungal NRPS complex has not been reported previously. The project has to date produced two publications, one issued patent and one pending patent application. The continued Phase II work will involve engineering of the specific modifications required to confer Aspergillus spp. activity to AbA and the preparation/selection of a producer strain capable of high production levels. Successful completion of the project will: [1] provide an efficient, well-tolerated drug to a market with a strong demand for new products; [2] address a very immediate need from a growing patient population which currently have very few treatment options; and [3] provideproof of concept and critical tools for a novel and potentially very powerful approach to the discovery of new and improved therapeutics. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The continuing increase in the number of surgery, transplantation, cancer and other immunocompromized patients, that need treatment for fungal infections, has generated an immediate unmet need for new antifungal drugs with novel modes of action. The proposed project will add a potent, efficacious, well-tolerated and economical drug to an inventory of antifungal drugs that currently is both limited and associated with significant limitations.


Aureogen Biosciences, Inc. | Entity website

Technology and Research About 70% of currently used drugs are natural products or derivatives of natural products. In contrast to synthetic compounds, natural product compounds are not generated by chemical synthesis, but instead isolated from living microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi ...


Aureogen Biosciences, Inc. | Entity website

AureoGen News April 30, 2009 AureoGen receives a Michigan 50 Companies to Watch award from The Edward Lowe Foundation in association with the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, Michigan Small Business & Technology Development Center, Small Business Association of Michigan, the U.S ...


Aureogen Biosciences, Inc. | Entity website

AureoGen Funding: AureoGen has to date raised approximately $7.8 million from the following sources: $200,000 ...


Aureogen Biosciences, Inc. | Entity website

Mission Statement A number of successful drugs are natural products or derivatives of natural products. In contrast to synthetic compounds, natural products are not generated by chemical synthesis but instead isolated from microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi ...


Aureogen Biosciences, Inc. | Entity website

Founders and Management AureoGen was founded by Ake Elhammer, Ph.D ...

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