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Torremolinos, Spain

Bellido J.J.,Aula del Mar de Malaga | Bellido J.J.,University of Malaga | Baez J.C.,University of Malaga | Baez J.C.,Spanish Institute of Oceanography | And 5 more authors.
Vie et Milieu | Year: 2012

The Alborán Sea hosts the largest population of common dolphin in the Mediterranean Sea. This species of cetacean has the highest number of recorded strandings on the Andalusian coast. We analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of 633 short-beaked common dolphins stranded on this coast during the period 1996-2009. The spatial distribution of the strandings differed between the Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts of the Andalusian littoral. Mean body size was 163.3 ± 35.6 cm, although body size was not homogeneously distributed along the coast. These cetaceans tended to be larger on the Atlantic coast than on the rest of the Andalusian coast. Although others factors must be taken into account, the stranding patterns may be explained by the density of short-beaked common dolphins in inshore waters. The number of strandings suggests intense use by this species of the continental shelf along the Andalusian coast, with the possibility of conflict between dolphins and human activities in the Alborán Sea. Source


Bellido J.J.,Aula del Mar de Malaga | Bellido J.J.,University of Malaga | Baez J.C.,Spanish Institute of Oceanography | Castillo J.J.,Aula del Mar de Malaga | And 4 more authors.
Chelonian Conservation and Biology | Year: 2010

Human and natural factors threaten loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta, Linnaeus 1758) survival in the western Mediterranean basin. Loggerhead stranding data in the south of Spain provide evidence that human activities are having a more detrimental effect on larger-sized loggerhead turtles. The straight carapace length of 162 individuals affected by natural causes averaged 35.15 cm; whereas, that of 179 individuals affected by human-related causes averaged 46.23 cm. The difference was highly significant. © 2010 Chelonian Research Foundation. Source


Baez J.C.,Spanish Institute of Oceanography | Baez J.C.,University of Malaga | Bellido J.J.,University of Malaga | Ferri-Yanez F.,University of Malaga | And 6 more authors.
Scientia Marina | Year: 2011

The aim of this study was to explore the possible link between variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and sea surface temperature (SST) and the abundance of loggerhead turtles around the Strait of Gibraltar, using stranding data for the Andalusian coastal area as a proxy for abundance. The annual average SST (from November to October) in the Gulf of Cadiz was negatively associated with the total number of loggerhead strandings each year from November 1997 to October 2006 in the Gulf of Cadiz and the Alboran Sea. The average NAO index was positively associated with the number of strandings in the Gulf of Cadiz in the following year. Prevailing westerly winds during positive NAO phases and the subsequent delayed decrease in SST may lead to turtles from the west Atlantic accumulating in the Gulf of Cadiz and unsuccessfully attempting to return. Secondary causes, such as buoyancy, cold stunning, longline fisheries, net fisheries, debilitated turtle syndrome, and trauma may also increase the number of turtle strandings. Source


Bellido J.J.,Aula del Mar de Malaga | Bellido J.J.,University of Malaga | Baez J.C.,Spanish Institute of Oceanography | Baez J.C.,University of Malaga | And 4 more authors.
Animal Biodiversity and Conservation | Year: 2010

A juvenile loggerhead turtle with buoyancy problems was captured in the Alboran Sea (Mediterranean Sea, south of Spain) and released 14 months later after healing. Six days after the release, the turtle was seen swimming 42 km from the point of release, displaying unusual behaviour. We re-captured and released it again, 95 nautical miles offshore, near the Alboran Island. Ten days later the turtle arrived at the beach close to where it had been maintained in captivity. We discuss these findings in the context of behavioural alteration and habituation in released sea turtles. Capture-mark-recapture studies of sea turtles should be approached with caution as manipulated animals may modify their usual behaviour. © 2010 Museu de Ciències Naturals. Source


Bellido J.J.,Aula del Mar de Malaga | Bellido J.J.,University of Malaga | Castillo J.J.,Aula del Mar de Malaga | Pinto F.,Aula del Mar de Malaga | And 4 more authors.
Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom | Year: 2010

Every year, an undetermined number of loggerhead turtles cross the Gibraltar Strait entering and going out of the Mediterranean Sea. An unknown percentage of them strand on the Andalusian beaches, alive or dead, with an unequal distribution along the coast. We found a geographical pattern in the density of strandings, as well as in the proportion of them that were alive and dead. Atlantic areas receive a higher number of strandings, although most of them correspond to dead individuals, especially on the west coast (province of Huelva), whereas on the Mediterranean coast there is less difference between the number of alive and dead turtles stranded. The causes of stranding also presented a spatial segregation along these coasts: net fisheries were concentrated in Huelva, cold stunning was more frequent in Atlantic Cdiz, and debilitated turtle syndrome and longline were biased to the Mediterranean coast. The Atlantic areas might be an important accumulation zone for turtles, but where they endure a high human-induced stress and mortality. In the Mediterranean area, different causes, such as the narrowness of the Alborn basin, the ocean currents, human activity, or the number of turtles crossing, may increase the number of turtles stranding alive on the coast. Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2009. Source

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