Auckland District Health Board Auckland

Auckland, New Zealand

Auckland District Health Board Auckland

Auckland, New Zealand
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Grae N.,New Zealand Health Quality and Safety Commission Wellington | Roberts S.,Auckland District Health Board Auckland | Morris A.,Auckland District Health Board Auckland
ANZ Journal of Surgery | Year: 2017

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are serious adverse events hindering surgical patients' recovery. In Australia and New Zealand, SSIs are a huge burden to patients and healthcare systems. A bundled approach, including pre-theatre nasal and/or skin decolonization has been used to reduce the risk of staphylococcal infection. The aim of this review is to assess the effectiveness of the bundle in preventing SSIs for cardiac and orthopaedic surgeries. The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Published literature was searched in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library of Systematic reviews. Identified articles were selected and extracted based on a priori defined Population-Intervention-Comparator-Outcome and eligibility criteria. Data of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative observational studies were synthesized by meta-analyses. Quality appraisal tools were used to assess the evidence quality. The review included six RCTs and 19 observational studies. The bundled treatment regimens varied substantially across all studies. RCTs showed a trend of Staphylococcus aureus SSIs reduction due to the bundle (relative risk=0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.33, 1.06) with moderate heterogeneity. Observational studies showed statistically significant reduction in all-cause and S. aureus SSIs, with 51% (95% CI=0.41, 0.59) and 47% (95% CI=0.35, 0.65), respectively. No publication biases were detected. SSIs in major cardiac and orthopaedic surgeries can be effectively reduced by approximately 50% with a pre-theatre patient care bundle approach. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.


PubMed | Auckland District Health Board Auckland
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Respirology case reports | Year: 2015

A 41-year-old man with no previous asbestos exposure presented with 6 months of dull right lower chest pain and weight loss. The initial computed tomography (CT) scan was reported as showing a soft tissue thickening in the posterior mediastinum with non-specific nodules in the horizontal and oblique fissures. An endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration from the 1225mm heterogeneous posterior mediastinal mass was suspicious for a ganglioneuroma. The procedure was complicated by a large hemothorax requiring drainage. A subsequent positron emission tomographic CT revealed a moderately fluorodeoxyglucose avid area of pleural thickening extending from the sixth to ninth thoracic vertebral body in the paraspinal region along with nodules along the right horizontal and oblique fissures. A thoracoscopic biopsy of the pleural lesion confirmed a pleural epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. There was a 5-mm reduction in tumor thickness and improvement in his pain following 54Gy of radiotherapy.

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