Montgomery, AL, United States

Auburn University at Montgomery

www.aum.edu
Montgomery, AL, United States

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

EUFAULA, Ala.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Alabama Virtual Academy at Eufaula City Schools (ALVA-ECS), an accredited, full-time online public school program serving students in Kindergarten through 12th grade, will honor the Class of 2017 at a graduation ceremony on Friday, May 19, at Eufaula High School. Sixteen ALVA-ECS graduates have the opportunity to join fellow seniors at Eufaula High School, a local brick and mortar secondary school serving grades 9 through 12, as part of a combined commencement. This year’s virtual graduates have been accepted to the following universities and post-secondary institutions: University of Alabama – Birmingham, Southern Union State Community College, Jefferson State Community College, Calhoun Community College, Auburn University at Montgomery, Troy University, Northwest Shoals Community College, and St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, TX. ALVA-ECS provides a rigorous, engaging online curriculum, including courses in language arts/English, math, science, history, world languages, art and music, as well as high school electives and Advanced Placement® courses. ALVA-ECS offers an individualized approach to ensure every student receives an exceptional learning experience. Details of the commencement are as follows: ALVA-ECS is authorized by the Alabama State Department of Education and the Eufaula City Schools Board of Education. Established in 1872, Eufaula City Schools is the oldest city school district in Alabama and is the heartbeat of this beautiful southeast Alabama city. Eufaula City Schools is a progressive district providing many academic, enrichment, and technical opportunities for students and teachers while maintaining the values and traditions of the best in public schools. More information can be found at www.eufaulacityschools.org or https://youtu.be/bNhbdkiFyAY. Eufaula City Schools also has Facebook and Twitter pages. K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN) is driving innovation and advancing the quality of education by delivering state-of-the-art, digital learning platforms and technology to students and school districts across the globe. K12’s curriculum serves over 2,000 schools and school districts and has delivered more than four million courses over the past decade. K12 is a company consisting of thousands of online school educators providing instruction, academic services, and learning solutions to public schools and districts, traditional classrooms, blended school programs, and directly to families. The K12 program is offered through K12 partner public schools in 33 states and the District of Columbia, and through private schools serving students in all 50 states and more than 100 countries. More information can be found at K12.com.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has ranked the best universities and colleges in Alabama for 2017. Using government-backed data, the site found 27 four-year schools had the caliber to be on the list. Samford University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Spring Hill College, Auburn University and University of Alabama in Huntsville came in as the top five. 26 two-year schools also made the list, with Enterprise State Community College, Gadsden State Community College, Wallace State Community College Hanceville, Southern Union State Community College and Lurleen B. Wallace Community College ranked as the best five. A full list of schools is included below. “Alabama currently has the third-highest unemployment rate in the country, but schools are working to combat that by providing quality higher education opportunities,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “The colleges and universities on our list offer certificates, degrees and employment resources that best set students up for success in the workforce after school.” To be included on the Alabama’s “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised for additional data that includes employment services, student counseling, annual alumni salaries 10 years after entering college, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and financial aid offerings. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Alabama” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Alabama for 2017 include: Alabama A & M University Alabama State University Amridge University Athens State University Auburn University Auburn University at Montgomery Birmingham Southern College Faulkner University Huntingdon College Jacksonville State University Judson College Miles College Oakwood University Samford University Spring Hill College Stillman College Talladega College The University of Alabama Troy University Tuskegee University University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Alabama in Huntsville University of Mobile University of Montevallo University of North Alabama University of South Alabama University of West Alabama The Best Two-Year Colleges in Alabama for 2017 include: Alabama Southern Community College Bevill State Community College Bishop State Community College Calhoun State Community College Central Alabama Community College Chattahoochee Valley Community College Enterprise State Community College Faulkner State Community College Gadsden State Community College H Councill Trenholm State Technical College J F Drake State Community and Technical College J F Ingram State Technical College Jefferson Davis Community College Jefferson State Community College Lawson State Community College-Birmingham Campus Lurleen B Wallace Community College Northeast Alabama Community College Northwest-Shoals Community College Reid State Technical College Remington College-Mobile Campus Shelton State Community College Snead State Community College Southern Union State Community College Wallace Community College - Dothan Wallace Community College - Selma Wallace State Community College - Hanceville About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Esco M.R.,Auburn University at Montgomery
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2011

Esco, MR, Williford, HN, and Olson, MS. Skinfold thickness is related to cardiovascular autonomic control as assessed by heart rate variability and heart rate recovery. J Strength Cond Res 25(8): 2304-2310, 2011-The purpose of this study was to determine if heart rate recovery (HRR) and heart rate variability (HRV) are related to maximal aerobic fitness and selected body composition measurements. Fifty men (age = 21.9 ± 3.0 years, height = 180.8 ± 7.2 cm, weight = 80.4 ± 9.1 kg, volunteered to participate in this study. For each subject, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and the sum of skinfolds across the chest, abdomen, and thigh regions (SUMSF) were recorded. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed during a 5-minute period while the subjects rested in a supine position. The following frequency domain parameters of HRV were recorded: normalized highfrequency power (HFnu), and low-frequency to high-frequency power ratio (LF:HF). To determine maximal aerobic fitness (i.e., V̇O 2max), each subject performed a maximal graded exercise test on a treadmill. Heart rate recovery was recorded 1 (HRR1) and 2 (HRR2) minutes during a cool-down period. Mean V̇O 2max and BMI for all the subjects were 49.5 ± 7.5 ml·kg -1·min -1 and 24.7 ± 2.2 kg·m -2, respectively. Although V̇O 2max, WC, and SUMSF was each significantly correlated to HRR and HRV, only SUMSF had a significant independent correlation to HRR1, HRR2, HFnu, LF:HF (p < 0.01). The results of the regression procedure showed that SUMSF accounted for the greatest variance in HRR1, HRR2, HFnu, and LF:HF (p < 0.01). The results of this study suggest that cardiovascular autonomic modulation is significantly related to maximal aerobic fitness and body composition. However, SUMSF appears to have the strongest independent relationship with HRR and HRV, compared to other body composition parameters and V̇O 2max. © 2011 National Strength and Conditioning Association.


Johnson B.E.,Auburn University at Montgomery
Journal of Transport Geography | Year: 2012

The High-Speed Intercity Passenger Rail (HSIPR) Program succeeds in proposing a truly high-speed rail route in California that will offer travelers significantly faster trips than driving on a route that is too short to conveniently fly instead. Unfortunately, the proposed routes in the Northeast, Midwest, and Northwest will continue to chug along at medium-speeds and attract few new riders from among those who currently travel those areas via highway or air. The plan does indeed succeed in calling for TOD around high-speed rail stations. The HSIPR Program must, however, encourage local planning jurisdictions to broadly liberalize land use controls to allow for compact development rather than writing new zoning codes to require the intensive land uses developers desire anyway. Trains must truly be fast, with stations surrounded by dense development, for America's high-speed rail plan to realize its full potential. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Winters J.V.,Auburn University at Montgomery
Journal of Regional Science | Year: 2011

This paper examines why smart cities are growing by investigating who moves to smart cities and who stays. Smart cities are often centers of higher education, so students moving to pursue higher education may play an important role. I find that the greater in-migration to smart cities is mostly due to persons enrolled in higher education. Smart cities are growing in part because in-migrants often stay in the city after completing their education. The growth of smart cities is also mostly attributable to population redistribution within the same state and has little effect on population growth at the state level. © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Esco M.R.,Auburn University at Montgomery
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2013

The body adiposity index (BAI) is a new simplistic method for predicting body fat percentage (BF%) via a simple equation of hip circumference to height. A scientific study of this novel method in athletic groups is warranted because of the possibility of it serving as an inexpensive field technique. The purpose of this study was to cross-validate the BAI for predicting BF% in a group of collegiate female athletes by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as the criterion variable. Thirty college-aged female athletes (age = 20.0 ± 1.3 years) participated in this study. For each participant, BF% was obtained with the BAI method and compared with DXA. The mean BF% was 27.1 ± 3.4 by the BAI and 26.7 ± 5.9 from DXA, which was not significantly different (p > 0.05). However, the BAI did not provide a significant correlation with the DXA (r = 0.28, R2 = 0.08, p > 0.05) and resulted in a standard error of estimate = 5.78% and total error = 5.84%. Bland-Altman plot showed that the limits of agreement (95% confidence intervals) between the DXA and BAI ranged between-10.2 and 11.8%, and there was a significant negative association between the difference and mean of the 2 methods (r = 20.52, p < 0.01). The results of this investigation indicate that BAI results in large individual errors when predicting BF% in female athletes and has a tendency to provide overestimated values as BF% decreases. Therefore, this method should not be used for predicting individual BF% in athletic women. © 2013 National Strength and Conditioning Association.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ENG DIVERSITY ACTIVITIES | Award Amount: 90.00K | Year: 2011

This proposal is to prepare 20 students in engineering disciplines admitted to Auburn University, by engaging them into variety of activities needed to successfuly complete a program of study in engineering at Auburn University. This is the second summer bridge program, as the PI has conducted the first bridge program in summer of 2010. This bridge program is to provide mentoring activities, and to enhance the engineering curricula. Academic preparation is a major focus for this summer bridge program. The program provides credit hours of english and pre-calculus courses. Time management, counselor interactions leadership and communication skills seminars, are also provided during this 5 weeks bridge program. At least 50% of the students are females.

The students will have an opportunity to learn about college life, how to balance their academic curricula, time management, and communication skills. The students will bond together, and help each other succeed. This bridge summer program will provide them with the gate keeper courses that they need to start a successful engineering freshman year. This program will help increasing the students retention from the underrepresented groups that are enrolled in engineering programs.


Described herein is a process for producing nutraceutical compositions that includes fermenting a species of Monascus in the presence of one or more co-products produced during corn ethanol fermentation, milo ethanol fermentation, or a combination thereof. During fermentation, the Monascus species produces valuable nutraceuticals that have numerous health benefits. In one aspect, the nutraceutical composition containing the microbial cells and nutraceuticals is then processed directly into animal feed in order to improve animal health. The processes and compositions described herein represent significant savings of time and materials and optionally make use of co-products of biofuel production. In other aspects, one or more nutraceuticals can be extracted from the nutraceutical composition and used to improve human health in pharmaceutical applications.


Patent
Auburn University at Montgomery | Date: 2014-03-12

Described herein is a process for producing saccharides and ethanol from biomass feedstock that includes (a) producing an enzyme composition by culturing a fungal strain(s) in the presence of a lignocellulosic medium, (b) using the enzyme composition to saccharify the biomass feedstock, and (c) fermenting the saccharified biomass feedstock to produce ethanol. The process is scalable and, in certain aspects, is capable of being deployed on farms, thereby allowing local production of saccharides and ethanol and resulting in a reduction of energy and other costs for farm operators. Optional steps to improve the biomass-to-fuel conversion efficiency are also contemplated, as are uses for byproducts of the process described herein.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY | Award Amount: 137.82K | Year: 2015

This project is an integration of mathematical modeling and experimental analysis of an invertebrate predator-prey system to explore the effects of habitat fragmentation, conditional dispersal, predation, and interspecific competition on herbivore population dynamics from the patch level to the landscape level. It represents a unique collaboration between two mathematicians, and ecologist, and undergraduate and PhD students. This project is expected to provide much-needed information in population ecology on the consequences of conditional dispersal to population dynamics of species in fragmented landscapes. Results from this project will answer several key ecological questions such as will the presence of density dependent dispersal help to moderate potentially detrimental factors as habitat fragmentation or worse, exacerbate their effects. The project will also provide a significant contribution towards the analysis of elliptic boundary value problems with nonlinear boundary conditions, as new mathematical tools will be developed to better understand the dynamics of these population models. Finally, the project will provide clear guidelines for how empirical studies should be constructed to evaluate the presence and consequences of density dependent dispersal in light of the predictions of these theoretical models. The investigators will disseminate the results of this project to both the ecological and mathematical communities through various media including peer-reviewed mathematical and ecological journals, talks at national and international conferences, and a user-friendly website showcasing the research. An important aspect of this project will involve the training of graduate and undergraduate students through workshops hosted by the investigators and mentorship of independent research projects. Moreover, a population dynamics curriculum covering basic population ecology through mathematical tools and interesting examples for exploring population models related to density dependent dispersal will be developed targeting undergraduate and advanced level high school students and freely available to the public via the projects website.

The purpose of this collaborative project between will be an integration of modeling of population dynamics via reaction diffusion models, mathematical analysis, and experimental analysis of an invertebrate system to explore the effects of habitat fragmentation, conditional dispersal, predation, and interspecific competition on herbivore population dynamics from the patch level to the landscape level. This study will help answer important biological questions such as 1) what patch level effects can be expected from density dependent dispersal, specifically of positive, negative or U-shaped density dependent dispersal, 2) does density dependent dispersal moderate or even exacerbate the effects of habitat fragmentation, Allee effects, interspecific competition, or predation on local or regional stability/persistence of a population, and 3) how should empirical studies be constructed to evaluate the presence and consequences of density dependent dispersal in light of the predictions of these theoretical models. A more comprehensive understanding of the patch and landscape level consequences of density dependent dispersal in the presence of such complicating factors as predation, interspecific competition, and habitat fragmentation is important by itself, but may also lead to the development of better population management strategies, especially in an environment where populations face diverse ecological challenges due to predation, habitat fragmentation, and global climate change. This project is expected to be significant by providing much-needed information in population ecology on the consequences of conditional dispersal (i.e., as a function of the density of conspecifics, interspecific competitors, and predators) to population dynamics of species in fragmented landscapes. The research is novel because, to date, theoretical and empirical studies in fragmented systems have ignored other forms of density dependent dispersal (negative or U-shaped) that are commonly found in nature. Results from this project will answer several key ecological questions as to whether the presence of negative or U-shaped density dependent dispersal helps to moderate potentially detrimental factors as habitat fragmentation or worse, exacerbate their effects. The project will also provide a significant contribution towards the analysis of elliptic boundary value problems with nonlinear boundary conditions, as new mathematical tools will be developed to better understand the dynamics of these population models. Further, development of a true landscape level modeling framework built on reaction diffusion equations will serve as a foundation for enhanced study of landscape dynamics in theoretical models. The investigators plan to disseminate the results of this project to both the ecological and mathematical communities through various media including: the ArXiv, peer-reviewed mathematics, mathematical biology, and ecology journals, and in talks at mathematical biology and ecological conferences.

Loading Auburn University at Montgomery collaborators
Loading Auburn University at Montgomery collaborators