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News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

In more ways than one, medicine is dying. A 2015 article in JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that almost a third of medical school graduates become clinically depressed upon beginning their residency training. That rate increases to almost half by the end of their first year. Between 300 and 400 medical residents commit suicide annually, one of the highest rates of any profession, the equivalent of two average-sized medical school classes. Survey the programs of almost any medical conference and you'll find sessions dedicated to contending with physician depression, burnout, higher-than-average divorce rates, bankruptcy, and substance abuse. At the risk of sounding unsympathetic, medicine should be difficult. No other profession requires such rigorous and lengthy training, such onerous and ongoing scrutiny, and the continuous self-interrogation that accompanies saving or failing to save lives. But today's crisis of physician burnout is the outcome of more than just a job that's exceptionally difficult. The debate in Washington over the American Health Care Act to repeal and replace Obamacare, changing the degree of health coverage guaranteed to Americans, has monopolized our attention. But underneath, glacially slow changes to the way doctors deliver care are occurring. Medicine is undergoing an agonizing transformation that's both fundamental and unprecedented in its 2500-year history. What's at stake is nothing less than the terms of the contract between the profession and society. An electronic medical record, or EMR, is not all that different from any other piece of record-keeping software. A health care provider uses an EMR to collect information about their patient, to describe their treatment, and to communicate with other providers. At times, the EMR might automatically alert the provider to a potential problem, such as a complex drug interaction. In its purest form, the EMR is a digital and interconnected version of the paper charts you see lining the shelves of doctors' offices. And if that's all there were to it, a doctor using an EMR would be no more worrisome than an accountant switching out her paper ledger for Microsoft Excel. But underlying EMRs is an approach to organizing knowledge that is deeply antithetical to how doctors are trained to practice and to see themselves. When an EMR implementation team walks into a clinical environment, the result is roughly that of two alien races attempting to communicate across a cultural and linguistic divide. When building a tool, a natural starting point for software developers is to identify the scope, parameters, and flow of information among its potential users. What kind of conversation will the software facilitate? What sort of work will be carried out? This approach tends to standardize individual behavior. Software may enable the exchange of information, but it can only do so within the scope of predetermined words and actions. To accommodate the greatest number of people, software defines the range of possible choices and organizes them into decision trees. Yet medicine is uniquely allergic to software's push toward standards. Healthcare terminology standards, such as the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED), have been around since 1965. But the professional consensus required to determine how those terms should be used has been elusive. This is partly because not all clinical concepts lend themselves to being measured objectively. For example, a patient's pulse can be counted, but "pain" cannot. Qualitative descriptions can be useful for their flexibility, but this same flexibility prevents individual decisions from being captured by even the best designed EMRs. More acutely, medicine avoids settling on a shared language because of the degree to which it privileges intuition and autonomy as the best answer to navigating immense complexity. One estimate finds that a primary care doctor juggles 550 independent thoughts related to clinical decision-making on a given day. Though there are vast libraries of guidelines and research to draw on, medical education and regulations resist the urge to dictate behavior for fear of the many exceptions to the rule. Over the last several years, governments, insurance companies, health plans, and patient groups have begun to push for greater transparency and accountability in healthcare. They see EMRs as the best way to track a doctor's decision-making and control for quality. But the EMR and the physician are so at odds that rather than increase efficiency—typically the appeal of digital tools—the EMR often decreases it, introducing reams of new administrative tasks and crowding out care. Many EMRs are designed to facilitate the job of billing before aiding in clinical decision-making. The result is a bureaucracy that puts controlling costs above quality and undervalues the clinical intuition around which medicine's professional identity has been constructed. The EMR and the physician are so at odds that rather than increase efficiency—typically the appeal of digital tools—the EMR often decreases it. Inputting information in the EMR can take up as much as two-thirds of a physician's workday. Physicians have a term for this: "work after clinic," referring to the countless hours they spend entering data into their EMR after seeing patients. The term is illuminating not only because it implies an increased workload, but also because it suggests that seeing patients doesn't feel like work in the way that data entry feels like work. The EMR causes an excruciating disconnect: from other physicians, from patients, from one's clinical intuition, and possibly even from one's ability to adhere faithfully to the Hippocratic oath. If a link between physicians' computer use and suicide seems like a stretch, consider a recent paper by the American Medical Association and the RAND Corporation, which places the blame for declining physician health squarely at the feet of the EMR. Drop-down menus and checkboxes not only turn doctors into well-paid data entry clerks. They also offend medical sensibility to its core by making the doctor aware of her place in an industrialized arrangement. Physicians in Westernized medicine were once trained through an informal system of apprenticeship. They were overwhelmingly white and male, and there was little in the way of regulatory oversight or public accountability. It was a physician's privilege to determine who received treatment, and how, and at what cost. Supernatural justifications for treatment techniques eventually ceded to pseudoscientific ones; prayer was replaced by bloodletting and cocaine (and more prayer). Wilhelm Fliess engaged in surgical trial-and-error on his collaborator Emma Eckstein. His friend Sigmund Freud institutionalized female hysteria. Franz Joseph Gall performed backbends to legitimize racism via phrenology. Then, in 1910, the Flexner Report caused a paradigmatic shift in medical education. Abraham Flexner was not a doctor, but a secondary school principal from Louisville, Kentucky, who later joined the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. It was there that he wrote "Medical Education in the United States and Canada," and transformed the lives of millions of people. The Flexner Report recommended that medical education develop an evidence-based curriculum. Under its influence, medicine was subjected to the rigors of peer review and the scientific method. Residency programs were established, uniting the university and the hospital, and placing apprenticeship within the academy. Medical teachers were expected to be proponents of the latest and most credible research. State licensure was tied to education, introducing some semblance of standards. The recommendations in the Flexner Report also formed the basis of what we today understand as the social contract between the medical profession and the people it serves. Patients are entitled to competence, altruism, morality, integrity, accountability, transparency, objectivity, and promotion of the public good. In return, physicians are entitled to trust, autonomy, self-regulation, a funded healthcare system, inclusion in public policy, monopoly, and prestige. In the intervening years, the tenets of physician prestige and self-regulation have remained intact. But the introduction of computerization has begun to rewrite the social contract between doctors and society, as EMRs lay the groundwork for the industrialization of medicine. Industrialization is the premise that people working together in a coordinated fashion will work more efficiently than one person doing everything themselves. To achieve this coordination requires standardization (the wheel goes on the car the same way every time); a technological innovation that makes work as simple as possible (an assembly line with power tools); and cheap labor (poor people). An expert dressmaker may have once been responsible for every aspect of their craft: designing the dress, procuring the fabric, cutting and stitching, marketing and selling. Some dressmakers might be particularly good at one or more of those things. A few might even be good at all of them. But even in the best-case scenario, the quality of the dresses and the rate of their production will vary wildly. Dressmaking is the kind of thing that's easy to industrialize. The pieces of the process can be categorized, standardized, and delegated. The language we use to refer to the parts of the dress, and the tasks associated with the job, are clear. Reducing the qualifications for participation in dressmaking renders individuals interchangeable and disposable. Industrialization has been applied to almost every field in which something is produced and sold. Now, EMRs are applying it to medicine. In the industrialized conception of medicine, as in the industrialized conception of all professions, more tasks become routine, and routine tasks are delegated downward, lowering overall costs. It's no surprise that in the health policy world the introduction of EMRs often accompanies a discussion about hiring less educated professionals, like nurses and pharmacists. Meanwhile, fewer and fewer spaces are designated as safe for creativity and intuition, because these are considered unpredictable and unreliable. In the industrialized conception of medicine, as in the industrialized conception of all professions, more tasks become routine, and routine tasks are delegated downward One wonders if it's possible to carve out a third way between the purely intuitive and the mechanically standardized. Atul Gawande has written extensively about this possibility, depicting a meeting of minds between autonomous doctors and health systems designers—and he manages to do so without making it seem terrifying or fantastical. In this world, technologies might seek to complement and enhance, rather than replace, the physician's ability to incorporate research into practice. Natural language processing and dictation will allow physicians to use any words they like while recording notes into an EMR, as opposed to drop-down menus and pick-lists. Artificial intelligences like IBM's Watson will comb through research on behalf of the physician and aid in clinical decision-making. The doctor's lounge, an increasingly rare phenomenon, is a basic form of technology that allows physicians to connect and share information. Not all innovations need to be bleeding edge. But reform is big business. The "eHealth" industry, which produces the infrastructure with which the square peg of medicine will be crammed into the round hole of scalable technology, is estimated to reach $308 billion by 2022, and is a key driver of America's $3 trillion national healthcare expenditure. The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society Annual Conference & Exhibition—the biggest eHealth conference in the world—was attended by just over 43,000 people in 2016. The allure of a disruptive solution that will tidily rationalize medicine has too many short-term winners to question—even if those winners are neither physicians nor patients. Conrad has written about play for Kill Screen magazine and music for Cokemachineglow. He lives in San Francisco where he works with family doctors as a health policy researcher. Follow him on Twitter at @Conrad_Amenta. This piece originally appeared in Logic, a new magazine about technology. Visit logicmag.io to subscribe or to preorder Tech Against Trump , a forthcoming book chronicling the rising tide of tech resistance to Trump, assembled by the editors of Logic.


Part of the problem may be that for many, advance care planning seems daunting. Nearly three-quarters of survey respondents said they think advance care planning, to live the end of their lives on their own terms, is more difficult than planning how to divide their estates after they die. "Significant work remains to achieve our goal to ensure that everyone in Massachusetts receives health care that honors their goals and priorities for their quality of life as well as quantity of life," said Atul Gawande, M.D., M.P.H., co-chair of the Coalition, executive director of Ariadne Labs, a joint center of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and author of the New York Times bestseller, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. "But the data shows hopeful signs as well," Gawande continued. "Nearly everybody in Massachusetts now views discussing plans for their serious illness care as important. And, our survey found that almost 30% of respondents heard more about advance care planning in the last year than before. All of this indicates momentum toward making sure we have these important conversations." The survey showed that 80% of respondents said they didn't want lifesaving medical care if it reduces their quality of life below levels they are willing to accept. And 14% percent said they want caregivers to do "whatever it takes" to keep them alive. The Coalition's goal is to make sure all such wishes are known and honored. The survey also found that, among people who had end-of-life care discussions with their clinicians, most (65%) initiated the conversations themselves. But when physicians did broach the conversation, the vast majority of respondents either considered it normal or were happy that their physicians brought it up. "Physicians are still placing the onus on patients to bring up this important topic. The physician community has made great strides, but we need to do better. And, as our survey found, patients welcome these conversations," Gawande said. Physicians are a very important part of the advance care planning puzzle—but even a discussion with a physician isn't enough to be certain one's wishes will be upheld. That job often falls to a health care agent. In Massachusetts, the health proxy form designates a single person to speak on an individual's behalf, if they are not able to speak for themselves. While people can list alternates, the form's intent is to empower a single responsible person. Many survey respondents seemingly did not have a firm grasp of the health-care proxy concept, responding that several different people were their agent. "I'm encouraged to see the Coalition raising awareness about important medical conversations we all need to have," said Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, whose administration is an active Coalition member. "My administration looks forward to working with the Coalition to explore how improvements in technology can simplify and facilitate the process used for individuals to relay their own wishes for end-of-life care." While process and policy may be roadblocks to advance care planning, personal experiences are spurring people into action. For respondents who initiated their conversations—either with loved ones or physicians—recent experiences with the death of a family member or friend was one of the major reasons they broached the subject. "Once somebody close to you has faced a serious illness, a conversation that once seemed abstract becomes far more real," said Maureen Bisognano, co-chair of the Coalition and president emerita and senior fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. "But, people cannot wait for a loved one to have a difficult death before they consider their own wishes for care. And, as our survey found, the discussions aren't that hard: 76% of those who have had conversations with physicians said the conversations were not at all difficult. The same is true for 66% of those who spoke to their loved ones. The findings show there's no reason end-of-life care discussions can't be a normal part of life." The Coalition will unveil the complete survey results at a summit today at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The summit also will be available to view via livestream here. Participate in the conversation about the summit by following #WriteYourScript on Twitter. To receive a copy of the comprehensive survey results, contact Brenna Fitzgerald at bfitzgerald@a-g.com. About the Massachusetts Coalition for Serious Illness Care The Massachusetts Coalition for Serious Illness Care includes a diverse set of organizations committed to ensuring that health care for everyone in the Commonwealth reflects their goals, values, and preferences. Each member organization commits to tangible initiatives to help advance this collective mission. These groups include physicians, nurses, hospice workers, counselors, clergy, hospital and health plan administrators, social workers, attorneys, policymakers, researchers, and other health professionals. The Coalition is funded by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts and the Rx Foundation. To learn more, visit maseriouscare.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/unfortunate-paradox-most-in-massachusetts-are-more-comfortable-writing-wills-for-after-our-deaths-than-controlling-how-we-want-to-spend-the-end-of-our-lives-300453727.html


By fibre type, cotton remains the largest segment, followed by nylon and polyester. Demand for cotton textile colourants was pegged at 541 thousand tonnes in 2016; this is expected to reach 561.6 thousand tonnes in 2017. Among other fibre types, acrylic is projected to grow at the fastest CAGR. By dye type, the market has been segmented into, Among these, reactive dye accounts for the highest volume share of the market. Over 611 thousand tonnes of reactive dyes were consumed in 2016 - this is projected to increase to over 636 thousand tonnes in 2017. Demand for acid dye, the second largest dye type, is expected to reach 586 thousand tonnes in 2017. On the basis of product form, the global textile colourant market has been segmented into powder, granules, paste, and liquid. Among these, demand for textile colourants in powder form is the highest, with this segment accounting for 663 thousand tonnes in demand. By application, the market has been segmented into apparels, household, technical textiles, automotive, and accessories. Demand for textile colourants in apparels is projected to surpass 1065 thousand tonnes in 2017. Asia Pacific excluding Japan remains the largest market for textile colourants globally. Textile colourants consumption in APEJ was estimated at 885 thousand tonnes in 2016; it is expected to grow to 925.5 thousand tonnes in 2017. Preview Analysis on Global Textile Colourant Market Segmentation By Application - Apparel, Household, Technical Textiles, Automotive, Accessories; By Dye Type - Reactive Dye, Acid Dye, Direct Dye, Disperse Dye, Basic Dye; By Product Form - Powder, Granules, Paste, Liquid; By Fibre Type - Wool, Nylon, Cotton, Polyester, Acrylic, Acetate, Rayon: http://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/textile-colourant-market China remains the largest consumer of textile colourants in APEJ, accounting for nearly 531 thousand tonnes in 2016. This represents a market opportunity worth US$ 1.34 Bn. China textile colourants market is anticipated to grow at 5.2% in terms of value during the forecast period. Leading companies profiled by Future Market Insights in its report include Huntsman Corporation, LANXESS AG, KRONOS Worldwide, Inc., Kiri Industries Ltd., Atul Ltd., Allied Industrial Corp., Ltd., Archroma Management LLC, DyStar Group, Standard Colors, Inc., and Dye Systems, Inc. Future Market Insights (FMI) is a leading market intelligence and consulting firm. We deliver syndicated research reports, custom research reports and consulting services which are personalized in nature. FMI delivers a complete packaged solution, which combines current market intelligence, statistical anecdotes, technology inputs, valuable growth insights and an aerial view of the competitive framework and future market trends.


By fibre type, cotton remains the largest segment, followed by nylon and polyester. Demand for cotton textile colourants was pegged at 541 thousand tonnes in 2016; this is expected to reach 561.6 thousand tonnes in 2017. Among other fibre types, acrylic is projected to grow at the fastest CAGR. By dye type, the market has been segmented into, Among these, reactive dye accounts for the highest volume share of the market. Over 611 thousand tonnes of reactive dyes were consumed in 2016 - this is projected to increase to over 636 thousand tonnes in 2017. Demand for acid dye, the second largest dye type, is expected to reach 586 thousand tonnes in 2017. On the basis of product form, the global textile colourant market has been segmented into powder, granules, paste, and liquid. Among these, demand for textile colourants in powder form is the highest, with this segment accounting for 663 thousand tonnes in demand. By application, the market has been segmented into apparels, household, technical textiles, automotive, and accessories. Demand for textile colourants in apparels is projected to surpass 1065 thousand tonnes in 2017. Asia Pacific excluding Japan remains the largest market for textile colourants globally. Textile colourants consumption in APEJ was estimated at 885 thousand tonnes in 2016; it is expected to grow to 925.5 thousand tonnes in 2017. Preview Analysis on Global Textile Colourant Market Segmentation By Application - Apparel, Household, Technical Textiles, Automotive, Accessories; By Dye Type - Reactive Dye, Acid Dye, Direct Dye, Disperse Dye, Basic Dye; By Product Form - Powder, Granules, Paste, Liquid; By Fibre Type - Wool, Nylon, Cotton, Polyester, Acrylic, Acetate, Rayon: http://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/textile-colourant-market China remains the largest consumer of textile colourants in APEJ, accounting for nearly 531 thousand tonnes in 2016. This represents a market opportunity worth US$ 1.34 Bn. China textile colourants market is anticipated to grow at 5.2% in terms of value during the forecast period. Leading companies profiled by Future Market Insights in its report include Huntsman Corporation, LANXESS AG, KRONOS Worldwide, Inc., Kiri Industries Ltd., Atul Ltd., Allied Industrial Corp., Ltd., Archroma Management LLC, DyStar Group, Standard Colors, Inc., and Dye Systems, Inc. Future Market Insights (FMI) is a leading market intelligence and consulting firm. We deliver syndicated research reports, custom research reports and consulting services which are personalized in nature. FMI delivers a complete packaged solution, which combines current market intelligence, statistical anecdotes, technology inputs, valuable growth insights and an aerial view of the competitive framework and future market trends.


While on the PCA pump, Tyler's status was only monitored by intermittent spot checks by a nurse on shift, which respiratory experts state is not sufficient to catch a rapid deterioration in breathing before it is too late. Tyler also may have been exhibiting signs of obstructive sleep apnea, a very common condition in the adult population that Thomas Frederickson MD, lead author of the RADEO guide, identifies as a key contributing factor to opioid-related respiratory depression. "This story is a reminder that opioid-related harm can occur anywhere, even in normal, healthy patients," says Michael Wong, JD, Executive Director of PPAHS. "The sudden deaths of patients, like Tyler's, can be prevented by continuously monitoring with capnography and screening for high-risk conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea." The video can be viewed on the PPAHS YouTube channel here. PPAHS has developed several resources aimed at improving opioid safety such as the PCA Safety Checklist which is a free, downloadable resource for clinicians developed to remind caregivers of the essential steps needed to be taken to initiate PCA with a patient, and to continue to assess that patient's use of PCA. This checklist was developed after consultation with a group of 19 renowned health experts, including intensive care specialist and a leader in medical checklist development Peter J. Pronovost, MD, PhD, FCCM, Professor, Departments of Anesthesiology/Critical Care Medicine and Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Medical Director, Center for Innovation in Quality Patient; and Atul Gawande, MD, Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health, who is a surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School and author of "The Checklist Manifesto." Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is a non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to promote safer clinical practices and standards for patients through collaboration among healthcare experts, professionals, scientific researchers, and others, in order to improve healthcare delivery. For more information, please go to www.ppahs.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-physician-patient-alliance-for-health--safety-releases-new-patient-story-focussed-on-patient-controlled-analgesia-300452103.html


Atul Vij, CTO of Saviynt and winner of the CTO of the Year Category, has been instrumental in adopting the latest technologies and applying them to improve the product and offer greater value to customers. Amit Saha, COO of Saviynt said, "Atul's leadership has helped Saviynt to achieve amazing industry recognition in a short period of time, as well as partner accolades, such as achieving the top AWS partner status, the Security Competency. Many of the largest enterprises demand that external vendors have a level of trust and competency in order to use their products.  Through Atul's amazing work over the last 12 months, Saviynt has brought on numerous Fortune 100 companies that are using us to secure some of the largest implementations in the world." An annual achievements and recognition awards program with active participation from a broad spectrum of industry voices produces the coveted annual IT World Awards recognition program. It encompasses every area of information technology to recognize the world's best in organizational performance, products and services, hot technologies, executives and management teams, successful deployments, product management and engineering, customer satisfaction, and public relations. "It's an honor to be named a winner by IT World Awards and to garner esteemed industry and peer recognition," said Atul. "As enterprises demand more capabilities for the Saviynt product, we are there to quickly and efficiently add to our feature set, anticipating industry shifts and future needs, ensuring that the updates are delivered with high quality, as well as agile processes and continuous delivery. This attitude permeates our entire organization and is certainly paying off for our customers." About NPG's IT World Awards As industry's leading technology research and advisory publication, Network Products Guide plays a vital role in keeping decision makers and end-users informed of the choices they can make in all areas of information technology. The Annual IT World Awards is part of the SVUS Awards® recognition program from Silicon Valley in the United States of America which also includes other programs such as CEO World Awards, Consumer World Awards, Customer Sales and Service World Awards, Golden Bridge Awards, Globee Fastest Growing Private Companies Awards, Info Security PG's Global Excellence Awards, Pillar World Awards, PR World Awards, and Women World Awards. To learn more, visit www.networkproductsguide.com Saviynt is a leading provider of Identity Governance & Administration (IGA) and Cloud Security solutions. Saviynt enables enterprises to secure applications, data and infrastructure in a single platform for Cloud (AWS, Azure, Office 365, Salesforce, Workday, etc.) and Enterprise (SAP, Oracle EBS, etc.). Saviynt delivers next generation IGA solution by integrating advanced risk analytics with fine-grained privilege management. With built-in support for continuous compliance management, SOD analysis & remediation, privileged access & role governance, Saviynt provides a best in class IGA 2.0 solution that addresses all your complex security and compliance needs. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/saviynts-atul-vij-wins-gold-in-the-12th-annual-2017-it-world-award-for-cto-of-the-year-300461650.html


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

Former Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan on Tuesday called for the Eskom board to be fired and a full investigation into not only Brian Molefe’s return to the power utility, but his actions in his previous job at Transnet. Gordhan told Parliament’s portfolio committee on public enterprises, of which he is now a member, that the public would not be fooled by unfeasible explanations on the circumstances surrounding Molefe’s shock reappointment as Eskom CEO this month. “The answers are all over the show, they lack credibility, both in the public domain and from what I am hearing here,” he said. “I don’t know whether the board lives in its own bubble of oblivion but the public is connecting the dots…. if we think we are bluffing the public, we have another thing coming.” He added: “Eskom is far too important an entity to become the personal toy of a few individuals. Either the board in its entirety should be dismissed or should voluntarily resign.” The remarks came after Public Enterprises Minister Lynne Brown appeared before the committee to discuss both Molefe’s return to Eskom, and the circumstances surrounding his departure. Brown announced that she would not oppose the opposition’s court application for his appointment to be set aside. She went on to add that she had recently learnt that Molefe had not resigned from Eskom last year, but in fact had asked for early retirement, hence the board’s proposal to pay him R30-million in a pension settlement. Gordhan asked Brown why she did not go to court to challenge the package, rather than agree that instead he could return to the helm of the company. Like opposition MPs had done earlier in the briefing, he asked the board whether a political instruction had been issued to allow Molefe to trade his seat as an MP for that of Eskom boss. “Who instructed you to rehire Mr Molefe, who made a phone call to whom?” While finance minister, Gordhan fell out publicly with Molefe over an investigation by National Treasury into coal contracts. Eskom’s coal contracts with the Gupta family’s Tegeta Exploration and Molefe’s direct contact with Atul Gupta became a key area of focus of former Public Protector Thuli Madonsela’s report on state capture. It prompted his departure from Eskom and MPs on Tuesday rubbished Brown’s assertion that to date Molefe has not been found guilty of any wrongdoing. Economic Freedom Fighters deputy leader Floyd Shivambu said Zuma might be challenging Madonsela’s report, but Molefe had never sought to do so. Gordhan went further, suggesting that at some point the committee should look into Molefe’s role as CEO of Transnet and “some of the transactions that are now coming under scrutiny”. He also called on members of the board to disclose the extent of their ties with the Gupta family and their companies.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: techcrunch.com

TechCrunch is pleased to bring you Alchemist Accelerator‘s demo day. Alchemist is one of those rare programs that focuses on enterprise startups. These aren’t your parents’ enterprise companies. Pitches today will span products that help businesses with crowdfunding, wearables, sustainable farming and managing meetings with the power of AI. Investors and press will hear pitches from 15 enterprise companies. The demos start at 3:00pm PT and are expected to last two hours. You can watch it live here. Nobal Technologies The Imirror is the world’s most advanced interactive mirror, helping retail connect with consumers in the fitting room — where buying decisions are made. Team: Pieter Boekhoff (2016 Startup Canada Entrepreneur of the Year, CIS MRU), Thomas Battle (MBA), Alain Kassangana (Masters Eng). Everykey The revolution of access control, Everykey can unlock your phone, laptop, car, house or any other device when you’re close by, and also log you into your website accounts! Team: John McAfee (founder of McAfee Antivirus), Simon Boag (former president of Chrysler and GM), Chris Wentz (who made more than $100,000 in college selling iPads), Max Simon (started a haunted house in middle school and grew it to millions in annual revenue). Flowzo The fastest internet service powered by locals that helps property owners generate cash flow. Team: Thu Nguyen (5G/Wireless at TELUS/Marvell, Waterloo Engineering), Andrew Ta (managed technology strategy teams at both of the largest Canadian telecoms: TELUS/Bell, Ivey MBA), Chris Yap (shipped fiber chips at Marvell, previous startup focused on 60GHz Hardware, Stanford Engineering). Visage Smart crowdsourcing platform allowing companies to find and engage instantly with diverse talent. Team: Joss Leufrancois (co-founded Aldelia, a $50 million recruitment business established in nine countries), Emmanuel Marboeuf (former technical expert and international speaker in cyberdefense innovation). Amper Helps plant managers in factories increase machine and labor productivity by having real-time access to key metrics of machines. Data is captured using a simple, non-invasive retrofit sensor that monitors across machine types. Team: Akshat Thirani (CS Northwestern University, won the Thiel Summit pitch prize), Phil House (CS Northwestern University), Sachin Lal (CS Northwestern University, won the 2016 MIT Clean Energy prize). Uptime (previously EyePiece) Building a smarter industrial communication system using wearables. Team: Will Schumaker (PhD in optics from Stanford/UMich), Michael Leung (PhD student in EE from Stanford/Waterloo). ContextSmith Enterprise sales and expansion platform that uses AI to maximize revenue for sales and account management teams. Team: Will Cheung (head of customer success at Sequoia-backed startup, CS from CMU), Jochen Bedersdorfer (Intel AI Group, VP Eng of text analytics startup). Edyza High-density Internet of Things for industrial IoT, smart agriculture and other use cases that involve scaling sensors and actuators to thousands in close proximity. Team: Rana Basheer (PhD, principal scientist Broadcom, Garmin), Atul Patel (OneScreen, Jornaya and OptimalSocial). HydroVirga High-sensitivity NMR detection for elemental analysis in water. Our unique IP allows for detection of trace contaminants in real time, using micro NMR technology. Team: George Farquar, PhD (former LLNL), Julie Bowen, PhD (former LLNL), Mark Stephenson (20+ years water industry experience). Privacera Data security platform for enterprises to manage and mitigate risks with sensitive data in one place. Team: Balaji Ganesan (former XA Secure, acquired by Hortonworks), Don Bosco Durai (former XA Secure, acquired by Hortonworks, former Bharosa, acquired by Oracle). Stellic (previously Metis Labs) Student success platform designed to help students organize their college journey and graduate on time. Built by students, for students, this solves growing student retention problem faced by higher education. Team: Sabih (CMU CS ’15), Rukhsar (CMU CS ’15), Jiyda (CMU IS ’15). MeetingSift AI-driven meeting collaboration platform that delivers deep actionable insights from meetings across the enterprise. Team: Alex Bergo, PhD (Expert Collab., NLP, ML), Viil Lid, PhD (Collab. tech., HCI, Analytics). Fuse Next-generation inventory software. In the U.S., $1 trillion, or 20 percent of retail sales, are Lost every year because of stockouts and overstocks. We prevent this loss by algorithmically generating a demand forecast and centralizing it with real-time sales, inventory and procurement data. Team: Anna Tolmach (Wharton, Stanford MBA), Rachel Liaw (Stanford, UCLA, JD Candidate, 2018), Bridget Vuong (Stanford University, MS CS). Moesif Platform that makes sense of the world’s API data to change how APIs are created, debugged and used. Team: Derric Gilling (Intel Xeon Phi CPU Architect, Computer Eng @University of Michigan), Xing Wang (Executive Producer @Zynga, previously Microsoft, Computer Science @MIT). Text IQ Protecting enterprises from high-stakes legal disasters by using AI to identify sensitive, reputationally damaging and privileged documents that frequently get missed by human analysts and attorneys. Team: Apoorv Agarwal (PhD in Computer Science, Columbia, original contributor of IBM Watson), Omar Haroun (JD/MBA, Columbia, 3x founder with recent exit). Deep Relevance Internal fraud monitoring platform that uses behavioral AI to help finance and audit teams prevent employee and vendor fraud. Team: Kiran Ratnapu (VP Risk Technology, Merrill Lynch, MIT, IIT Bombay), Prasanna Kumar (healthcare and machine learning at Epic and startups, IIT Bombay CS). Strypes 3D visualizations powering new digital experiences for consumers across all devices and browsers. Team: Alexa Fleischman (EMC, Box, Boston College), Zack Fleischman (Microsoft Xbox, Zynga, Carnegie Mellon University), Matt Schiller (The Advisory Board, Cornell University). The History Project Empowering organizations to document, share and present institutional knowledge through a visual collaboration tool. Team: Niles Lichtenstein (Harvard, Monitor, Ansible — acquired by IPG, Velti — acquired by Blackstone), Michael Devin (principal tech architect at Frog, DARPA Director’s Medal, GE), Ben Yee (ITP, UX at Gilt Group).

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