Attana AB

Stockholm, Sweden

Attana AB

Stockholm, Sweden
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2012.1.3-1 | Award Amount: 12.95M | Year: 2013

The NanoMILE project is conceived and led by an international elite of scientists from the EU and US with the aim to establish a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of nanomaterial interactions with living systems and the environment, and uniquely to do so across the entire life cycle of nanomaterials and in a wide range of target species. Identification of critical properties (physico-chemical descriptors) that confer the ability to induce harm in biological systems is key to allowing these features to be avoided in nanomaterial production (safety by design). Major shortfalls in the risk analysis process for nanomaterials are the fundamental lack of data on exposure levels and the environmental fate and transformation of nanomaterials, key issues that this proposal will address, including through the development of novel modelling approaches. A major deliverable of the project will be a framework for classification of nanomaterials according to their impacts, whether biological or environmental, by linking nanomaterial-biomolecule interactions across scales (sub-cellular to ecosystem) and establishing the specific biochemical mechanisms of interference (toxicity pathway).


Norberg O.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Norberg O.,Attana AB | Lee I.H.,University of Massachusetts Lowell | Aastrup T.,Attana AB | And 3 more authors.
Biosensors and Bioelectronics | Year: 2012

The photoinitiated radical reactions between thiols and alkenes/alkynes (thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry) have been applied to a functionalization methodology to produce carbohydrate-presenting surfaces for analyses of biomolecular interactions. Polymer-coated quartz surfaces were functionalized with alkenes or alkynes in a straightforward photochemical procedure utilizing perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) chemistry. The alkene/alkyne surfaces were subsequently allowed to react with carbohydrate thiols in water under UV-irradiation. The reaction can be carried out in a drop of water directly on the surface without photoinitiator, and any disulfide side products were easily washed away after the functionalization process. The resulting carbohydrate-presenting surfaces were evaluated in real-time studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) flow-through system with recurring injections of selected lectins, with intermediate regeneration steps using low pH buffer. The resulting methodology proved fast, efficient and scalable to high-throughput analysis formats, and the produced surfaces showed significant protein binding with expected selectivities of the lectins used in the study. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Norberg O.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Norberg O.,Attana AB | Deng L.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Aastrup T.,Attana AB | And 2 more authors.
Analytical Chemistry | Year: 2011

A photoclick method based on azide photoligation and Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition has been evaluated for the immobilization of carbohydrates to polymeric materials. The biomolecular recognition properties of the materials have been investigated with regard to applicable polymeric substrates and selectivity of protein binding. The method was used to functionalize a range of polymeric surfaces (polystyrene, polyacrylamide, polyethylene glycol), poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline), and polypropene) with various carbohydrate structures (based on α-D-mannose, β-D-galactose, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine). The functionalized surfaces were evaluated in real-time studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions using a quartz crystal microbalance flow-through system with a series of different carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins). The method proved to be robust and versatile, resulting in a range of efficient sensors showing high and predictable protein selectivities. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.83M | Year: 2011

The key and direct objective of DYNANO is to provide training with a deep knowledge and expertise on Dynamic Interactive Nanosystems for biomedical and biotechnological applications on the basis of the existing scientific and technological areas: dynamic chemistry / glycosciences / biology / nanosciences. DYNANO will expose researchers in training to the process of design, generation, optimization and biomedical / biotechnological / industrial applications of a variety of functional systems like membranes, biosensors, microarrays and nanodevices. This multidisciplinary approach brings together scientists and key private industry players with complementary backgrounds, as essential developmental pillars. DYNANO is a 48-month Initial Training Network aiming to provide: Advanced inter-disciplinary training in an integrated setting using a dynamic chemistry / glycosciences / nanotechnology platform. Inter-national and inter-cultural training for researchers in a network of highly skilled research groups throughout Europe. Inter-sectorial training between academic groups and participating industry Partners, with special emphasis on corporate R&D and entrepreneurship. Advanced knowledge from the design and generation of dynamic nanosystems adapted to glycoscience applications. New applications of dynamic nanosystems in biomedicine / biotechnology / industry, potentially leading to new products.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2013

The ITN WntsApp is organized to achieve 3 key aims: (i) Provide a committed training programme for young researchers to bridge the gap between basic scientific knowledge and drug development, (ii) Centring research on a key cancer-signalling pathway, WNT signalling, to stimulate synergies and (iii) Strengthening the link between international partners and private enterprises to stimulate innovation and facilitate exploitation of results. We have recruited ten full partners from academia and industry from seven EU countries, providing a highly interactive research and training programme. Fellows get exposed to a wide range of activities in the private sector, including biotechnology and drug development, but also the publishing business. WntsApp fellows also profit from the activities of the SME PCDI, who are professionals in advising and supporting young graduates researchers. The scientific focus will be on the WNT signalling pathway that mediates critical cell fate decisions and is strongly linked to cancer. The fellows will address the mechanisms that relay cellular WNT signals from the membrane to the cytosol and nucleus, at the atomic, molecular and organismal level. The underlying molecular mechanisms provide attractive drug targets, particularly in regenerative medicine and cancer treatment. We will study and interfere with WNT signalling at various levels, focusing on conceptual advances regarding receptor specificity, allosteric effects, assembly and disassembly of complexes, WNT-regulated conformational changes, regulation of protein stability, role of molecular chaperones, protein-protein interactions, consequences for stem cell maintenance, mutation-induced tumourigenesis and the generation of high affinity agonists and antagonists that modulate receptor activity. The coherent class of students working on this multidisciplinary theme will create synergisms, stimulate associated graduate schools and offer new opportunities for exploitation of results.


Mahon E.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Aastrup T.,Attana AB | Barboiu M.,French National Center for Scientific Research
Topics in Current Chemistry | Year: 2012

Molecular recognition in biological systems occurs mainly at interfacial environments such as membrane surfaces, enzyme active sites, or the interior of the DNA double helix. At the cell membrane surface, carbohydrate-protein recognition principles apply to a range of specific non-covalent interactions including immune response, cell proliferation, adhesion and death, cell-cell interaction and communication. Protein-protein recognition meanwhile accounts for signalling processes and ion channel structure. In this chapter we aim to describe such constitutional dynamic interfaces for biosensing and membrane transport applications. Constitutionally adaptive interfaces may mimic the recognition capabilities intrinsic to natural recognition processes. We present some recent examples of 2D and 3D constructed sensors and membranes of this type and describe their sensing and transport capabilities. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Mahon E.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Aastrup T.,Attana AB | Barboiu M.,French National Center for Scientific Research
Chemical Communications | Year: 2010

We describe multivalent biorecognition of adsorbed lectin layers by biomimetic sensing nanoplatforms based on dynamic glycovesicles in a continuous flow QCM setup. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Mahon E.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Aastrup T.,Attana AB | Barboiu M.,French National Center for Scientific Research
Chemical Communications | Year: 2010

Multivalent recognition of lectin layers by glyconanoparticle sugar-clusters has been used to study the carbohydrate-protein interactions in a QCM sensing setup. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-IAPP | Award Amount: 933.42K | Year: 2014

Nanomedicine and Nanosafety rely on the same fundamental interactions between the nanoparticle interface and the biological milieu surrounding it, and it is this corona of proteins and other biomolecules that form at the bio-nanointerface that determines the fate and behaviour of nanomaterials. Understanding, classifying and predicting nanoparticle coronas from their physicochemical properties offers a novel approach to screening for toxicity at early stages of product development and for regulatory purposes. This biomolecule corona also explains why many nanoparticle targeting strategies, that seem promising when tested under non-physiological conditions, fail when tested in vivo, where multiple competitive interactions occur, and where non-specific binding in many cases blocks the targeting functionality of the nanoparticles, rendering them inactive. However, despite the rapid increase of our understanding of the issues, methods by which to characterise the functioning bio-nanointerface in biologically relevant environments remain a challenge, and are time consuming and expensive. The partners in the NanoClassifier IAPP project are at the forefront of their respective areas and are pioneering new methodologies for study of complex questions in biologically relevant milieu and represent an optimal partnership to address this challenge. Together, NUID UCD and Attana AB will develop a cost effective, high throughput screening platform for characterisation of the bionanointerface and its cell-binding partners, to address a range of important questions currently hampering the implementation of nanotechnologies, both in medicine and generally in consumer products. The inter-sectoral nature of the project is critical to its success, as Attana AB bring their platform for kinetic characterization of protein interactions on intact cells in real time, and NUID UCD bring extensive understanding of the bionanointerface and its practical and regulatory significance.


Patent
Attana Ab | Date: 2011-12-19

A piezoelectric resonator for use in a sensor arrangement for detecting or measuring an analyte in a medium, comprises a quartz crystal plate, having a first crystal surface and a second crystal surface. The first crystal surface is provided with a first electrode, which has a surface area of less than 15 mm^(2 )and the second crystal surface is provided with a second electrode. The first electrode may have a rectangular surface shape. A flow cell for use in an apparatus for detecting or measuring an analyte in a medium, comprises walls that form a sensing chamber together with the resonator, and inlet and outlet openings for leading a fluid through the sensing chamber. A part of the resonator constitutes one of the walls of the sensing chamber and is arranged such that the first electrode is situated inside the sensing chamber.

Loading Attana AB collaborators
Loading Attana AB collaborators