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News Article | July 24, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

LONDON, July 24, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- INTRODUCTION The early stages of research related to drug discovery, including the identification of a relevant target and a viable lead compound, play a crucial role in the overall success of a drug in preclinical and / or clinical studies. The process of drug discovery is extremely demanding, both in terms of capital expenses and time. Moreover, there is always a high risk of failure associated with R&D programs and, given the increasing regulatory stringency, the approval of new drugs has become significantly complex as well. Over the years, outsourcing has emerged as a popular trend in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, and has demonstrated the potential to effectively cater to the growing demands associated with drug discovery as well. Contract Research Organizations (CROs), with dedicated teams of experts and innovative solutions across the various stages of the drug discovery and development process, are now located in all major global markets. Employing the services of these CROs offers a number of benefits to drug developers, including access to better technologies, latest R&D tools, cost and time savings and the potential to minimize risks associated with the drug discovery process. Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/5015345/ Specifically, the oncology market, with an estimated global prevalence of 32 million, imposes a heavy burden on the healthcare system. There exists a significantly high unmet need for novel therapeutic options in this domain, translating into a growing demand for drug discovery initiatives. Therefore, CROs have now emerged as important stakeholders in the oncology market. The increasing trend towards outsourcing has triggered the establishment of several strategic collaborations between drug / therapy developers and CROs. In fact, several CROs have acquired other small / mid-sized CROs or collaborated with them for upgrading their own drug discovery capabilities in an effort to provide integrated services to its clients. Opportunities arising from the growth of personalized medicines, the vast unmet need for therapies for orphan indications, and the adoption of novel technology solutions, such as deep learning solutions, cloud-based technology platforms and 3D cell culture systems, are likely to act as some of the primary drivers of growth within this sector. SCOPE OF THE REPORT The "Oncology Drug Discovery Services Market, 2017-2030" report features an extensive study of the current market landscape and the future potential of CROs providing drug discovery services in oncology. Cancer, one of the leading causes of death worldwide, is an extremely complex disease and medical science is still struggling to figure out the various factors associated with the disease's origin, propagation, spread (metastasis) and relapse. In fact, in 2017, a total of 1.7 million new cancer cases are estimated to be diagnosed in the US alone; during the same time period, close to 0.6 million patients are estimated to die due to cancer. With the increasing complexity of drug discovery and development process, the overall spending on R&D in the pharmaceutical / biotechnology sector has increased over the past few years. According to one particular source, this spending has increased from USD 108 billion in 2006 to USD 145 billion in 2016. Heavy investments are being made towards the discovery of novel approaches for the treatment of various types of cancers. The industry is currently under tremendous pressure not only to meet the expectations of a growing patient population but also to identify ways to address the risks associated with novel drug discovery programs. Over the years, CROs offering drug discovery services have contributed significantly and have now grown to become an integral and indispensable part of the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. This study presents an in-depth analysis of a diverse set of companies that offer services across the different steps, such as target identification, target validation, hit generation, hit-to-lead and lead optimization, of the drug discovery process. In addition to other elements, the report features: - A discussion on the current state of the market with respect to key players, along with information on the location of headquarters, drug discovery services provided (target identification, target validation, hit generation, hit-to-lead, lead optimization), depth of service portfolio (discovery / preclinical / clinical / commercial manufacturing) and product type (biologics / small molecules). - Elaborate profiles of established / emerging players. Each profile features a company overview, financial information, drug discovery service portfolio, recent developments and a view on its future outlook and strategy. - An overview of the most active regions in terms of drug discovery services for oncology. The report contains schematic representations of world maps that clearly indicate the location of drug discovery hubs across the world. - A comprehensive benchmark analysis, comparing the existing capabilities of various stakeholders within their respective peer groups, to identify ways to become more competitive in the industry. The analysis is based on key parameters such as the depth of service portfolio, the type of molecules researched and the nature of services offered by different companies. - An analysis of the agreements that have been established in the recent past, covering drug discovery agreements / research collaborations, license agreements, acquisitions, service alliances and joint venture agreements. - A competitive landscape review, featuring a multivariate bubble analysis, based on parameters such as the geographical location, founding year, number of drug discovery services offered and the level of partnering activity in recent years. - A discussion on the potential growth areas such as personalized medicines, orphan drugs and complex biopharmaceuticals, and innovative technologies including deep learning solutions and 3D cell culture systems, that are likely to present opportunities or act as growth drivers during the coming years. In addition, the study features a detailed analysis of the existing market size and the future growth potential of the oncology drug discovery services market for the period 2017-2030. We have provided insights on the likely regional evolution of the market, across North America, Europe, China and the rest of the world. Additionally, we have provided informed estimates of the likely market evolution on the basis of type of product (small molecule, biologics) and key steps of drug discovery (target identification, target validation, hit generation, hit-to-lead and lead optimization). In order to account for the uncertainties associated with some of the key parameters, and to add robustness to our model, we have presented three different forecast scenarios, depicting the conservative, base and optimistic tracks of the market's evolution. The research, analysis and insights presented in this report are backed by a deep understanding of key insights gathered from both secondary and primary research. Actual figures have been sourced and analyzed from publicly available data. For the purpose of this study, we invited over 100 stakeholders to participate in a survey, in order to solicit their opinions on upcoming opportunities, challenges and likely future trends. The opinions and insights presented in this study were also influenced by discussions conducted with experts in this field. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY The data presented in this report has been gathered via secondary and primary research. For all our projects, we conduct interviews with experts in the area to solicit their opinions on emerging trends in the market. This is primarily useful for us to draw out our own opinion on how the market will evolve across different regions and type of biopharmaceuticals. Where possible, the available data has been checked for accuracy from multiple sources of information. The secondary sources of information include: - Annual reports - Investor presentations - SEC filings - Industry databases - News releases from company websites - Government policy documents - Industry analysts' views While the focus has been on forecasting the market till 2030. This opinion is solely based on our knowledge, research and understanding of the relevant market gathered from various secondary and primary sources of information. CHAPTER OUTLINES Chapter 2 presents an executive summary of the insights captured in our research. It offers a high level view on the current state of the oncology drug discovery services market, specific factors impacting its growth and how the opportunity is likely to evolve in the mid-long term. Chapter 3 provides an introduction to the drug discovery approach. It includes details on the time taken for a drug to traverse from the bench to the market, along with a historical account of the evolution of the drug discovery process. It also provides an in-depth explanation of each of the five steps involved in the drug discovery process, including details on associated methods / technologies / approaches. Further, the chapter features a discussion on the key challenges associated with conducting drug discovery research in-house, highlighting the need for contract services providers and the evident shift towards outsourcing drug discovery related operations in oncology. Chapter 4 includes a comprehensive overview and analysis of the current market landscape of the oncology drug discovery services market. It features an analysis of drug discovery service providers on the basis of their geographical location, type of drug discovery service provided, depth of service portfolio (discovery / preclinical development / clinical development / commercial manufacturing) and the nature of product (small molecule / biologic). Chapter 5 provides detailed profiles of some of the oncology drug discovery service providers that offer end-to-end services. Each profile features a brief overview of the company, financial information, insights on drug discovery related services offered by the company, recent developments and a comprehensive future outlook. Chapter 6 provides detailed profiles of some of the oncology drug discovery service providers that offer target based services. Each profile features a brief overview of the company, its financial information, insights on drug discovery related services offered by the company, recent developments and a comprehensive future outlook. Chapter 7 provides detailed profiles of some of the oncology drug discovery service providers that offer lead based services. Each profile features a brief overview of the company, its financial information, insights on drug discovery related services offered by the company, recent developments and a comprehensive future outlook. Chapter 8 provides detailed profiles of some of the oncology drug discovery service providers that specialize in lead optimization. Each profile features presents a brief overview of the company, its financial information, insights on drug discovery related services offered by the company, recent developments and a comprehensive future outlook. Chapter 9 provides a comprehensive market forecast, depicting how the drug discovery services market for oncology is likely to evolve till 2030. We have presented an analysis of the evolving financial opportunity across various regions, such as North America, Europe, China and ROW. Additionally, we have analyzed the market size based on the nature of molecule (biologic, small molecule) and the key steps of drug discovery (target identification, target validation, hit-to-lead, lead identification and lead optimization). It is worth mentioning that our projections are backed by credible data procured from both secondary and primary sources, and a robust forecast approach validated by in-house and external experts. Chapter 10 provides a detailed benchmark analysis of the companies that provide drug discovery services in the oncology domain. The key parameters considered for this analysis include the depth of the service portfolio, the type of the molecule and the number of services offered by each company within a peer group (based on geography and employee base). The analysis allows the companies to compare their existing capabilities within their peer group and identify opportunities to become more competitive in the industry. Chapter 11 features an elaborate discussion and analysis on the collaborations and partnerships that have been recently inked amongst players in this market. We have also discussed the various partnership models that have been implemented, highlighting the most common forms of deals / agreements in this segment of the overall market. In addition to the aforementioned analysis, the chapter offers an illustrative bubble analysis representing the competitive landscape of players involved in the space, based on their experience, number of drug discovery services offered and the level of activity in terms of collaborations established in the field of oncology research. The key objective of this analysis is to establish a region-wise understanding of contract services offerings and key players involved in the oncology drug discovery market globally. Chapter 12 highlights important trends that are likely to impact CROs providing drug discovery services and influence their efforts to strengthen their presence in this competitive market. During our research, we identified a number of interesting trends, including focus on personalized medicines, orphan drugs and complex biopharmaceuticals, innovative applications of deep learning, use of 3 D cell culture systems and other novel technologies, which are being developed to reduce the innate complexities associated with drug discovery and optimize the time spent on the overall process. We believe that these trends are likely to significantly influence the industry's evolution over the coming decade. Chapter 13 presents insights from the survey conducted for this study. The participants, who were primarily Directors / CXO level representatives, helped us develop a deeper understanding on the nature of their services and their associated commercial potential. Chapter 14 summarizes the overall report. It presents a list of key takeaways and offers our independent opinion on the current market scenario and key trends that are likely to determine how the market is likely to evolve in the mid- and long terms. Chapter 15 is a collection of interview transcripts of the discussions held with some of the key players in this industry. Chapters 16 is an appendix, which provides tabulated data and numbers for all the figures in the report. Chapter 17 is an appendix, which contains the list of companies and organizations that have been mentioned in the report. EXAMPLE HIGHLIGHTS 1. During our research, we identified over 115 companies that are actively involved in providing a wide array of oncology drug discovery services; hit-to-lead and lead optimization are amongst the most common services offered by these CROs. 2. Around 25% of the companies offer end-to-end services for drug discovery, starting from target identification till lead optimization. Examples of such one stop shops include (in alphabetical order) Charles River Laboratories, Evotec, GE Healthcare Life Sciences, GenScript, Lonza, PerkinElmer, Syngene, and TCG Lifesciences. 3. The current market is characterized by the presence of several established, as well as emerging CROs. Examples of established players with more than 25 years of overall experience in pharmaceutical sector include AMRI, Aurora Fine Chemicals, Cayman Chemical, ChemDiv, Dalton Pharma Services, DavosPharma, Organix, SRI Biosciences and Syncom. Some of the new players that have recently entered this domain include (in alphabetical order) Abzena, Aurelia Bioscience, Envigo, Enzymlogic, HitGen, INOVOTION, New England Discovery Partners and Tybema BioSolutions. 4. Over 80% of these CROs are located in Europe and North America. It is also worth highlighting that there are several players offering CRO services for oncology drug discovery in certain emerging regions within Asia Pacific, namely India and China. Examples of some of the large-sized CROs based in these locations include (in alphabetical order) Aurigene, GVK Biosciences, Pharmaron, Piramal Pharma Solutions, Sai Life Sciences, ChemPartner and WuXi AppTec. 5. Although the services offered by these companies range from early drug discovery to drug development and commercialization, there are several companies that solely focus on providing drug discovery services. These include (in alphabetical order) Aquila BioMedical, Aris Pharmaceuticals, Attana, Axxam, Beactica, BellBrook Labs, BioDiscovery Group, CanAm Bioresearch, CreaGen Biosciences, Domainex, Evotec, Exiris, Icagen, Organix, Sapient Discovery, Viva Biotech and Zobio. 6. The market has witnessed significant partnering activity in the past three years; several CROs have forged strategic alliances with other services providers in order to expand their drug discovery capabilities. We identified over 70 such collaborations, inked specifically for oncology research. Over 30% of the agreements signed by CROs with other players, including drug / therapy developers or academic players, were focused on co-conducting research for the discovery of either therapeutic targets or lead molecules. Such agreements also involved several big pharma giants, such as (in alphabetical order) AbbVie, AstraZeneca, Daiichi Sankyo, Debiopharm Group, MERCK and Sanofi. Recent examples of acquisitions that we came across include Villapharma's acquisition by Eurofins (January 2017), HD Biosciences' acquisition by Wuxi AppTec (January 2017), Cyprotex's acquisition by Evotec (December 2016) and Blue Stream Laboratories' acquisition by Charles River Laboratories (June 2016). 7. Driven by the rising demand for novel therapeutic targets and drugs, and the growing importance of contract services, we expect the market to continue on its growth trajectory in the foreseen future. We expect the oncology drug discovery services market to grow at an annualized rate of 6.2%, over the period 2017-2030. In terms of geography, majority (more than 70%) of the share is distributed between North America and Europe; other countries, such as China, are likely to grow at a relatively faster rate in the coming decade. Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/5015345/ About Reportbuyer Reportbuyer is a leading industry intelligence solution that provides all market research reports from top publishers http://www.reportbuyer.com For more information: Sarah Smith Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com Email: query@reportbuyer.com Tel: +44 208 816 85 48 Website: www.reportbuyer.com


Kalograiaki I.,CSIC - Institute of Physical Chemistry "Rocasolano" | Kalograiaki I.,CIBER ISCIII | Kalograiaki I.,CSIC - Biological Research Center | Campanero-Rhodes M.A.,CSIC - Institute of Physical Chemistry "Rocasolano" | And 9 more authors.
Methods in Enzymology | Year: 2017

Bacterial surfaces are decorated with a diversity of carbohydrate structures that play important roles in the bacteria-host relationships. They may offer protection against host defense mechanisms, elicit strong antigenic responses, or serve as ligands for host receptors, including lectins of the innate immune system. Binding by these lectins may trigger defense responses or, alternatively, promote attachment, thereby enhancing infection. The outcome will depend on the particular bacterial surface landscape, which may substantially differ among species and strains. In this chapter, we describe two novel methods for exploring interactions directly on the bacterial surface, based on the generation of bacterial microarrays and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor chips. Bacterial microarrays enable profiling of accessible carbohydrate structures and screening of their recognition by host receptors, also providing information on binding avidity, while the QCM approach allows determination of binding affinity and kinetics. In both cases, the chief element is the use of entire bacterial cells, so that recognition of the bacterial glycan epitopes is explored in their natural environment. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Kalograiaki I.,CSIC - Institute of Physical Chemistry "Rocasolano" | Kalograiaki I.,CIBER ISCIII | Euba B.,CIBER ISCIII | Euba B.,Institute Agrobiotecnologia | And 8 more authors.
Analytical Chemistry | Year: 2016

Recognition of bacterial surface epitopes by host receptors plays an important role in the infectious process and is intimately associated with bacterial virulence. Delineation of bacteria-host interactions commonly relies on the detection of binding events between purified bacteria- and host-target molecules. In this work, we describe a combined microarray and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach for the analysis of carbohydrate-mediated interactions directly on the bacterial surface, thus preserving the native environment of the bacterial targets. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) was selected as a model pathogenic species not displaying a polysaccharide capsule or O-antigen-containing lipopolysaccharide, a trait commonly found in several important respiratory pathogens. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of NTHi microarrays for exploring the presence of carbohydrate structures on the bacterial surface. Furthermore, the microarray approach is shown to be efficient for detecting strain-selective binding of three innate immune lectins, namely, surfactant protein D, human galectin-8, and Siglec-14, to different NTHi clinical isolates. In parallel, QCM bacteria-chips were developed for the analysis of lectin-binding kinetics and affinity. This novel QCM approach involves capture of NTHi on lectin-derivatized chips followed by formaldehyde fixation, rendering the bacteria an integrated part of the sensor chip, and subsequent binding assays with label-free lectins. The binding parameters obtained for selected NTHi-lectin pairs provide further insights into the interactions occurring at the bacterial surface. © 2016 American Chemical Society.


Li X.,Northwest University, China | Song S.,Northwest University, China | Pei Y.,Northwest University, China | Dong H.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | And 2 more authors.
Sensors and Actuators, B: Chemical | Year: 2016

A two-dimensional (2D) and a three-dimensional (3D) His-tag capture surfaces were fabricated for oriented and reversible immobilization of His-tagged proteins on quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor surfaces, which can be used for label-free and real-time detection of the interactions between His-tagged protein and its interacting protein (analyte). His-tagged proteins immobilized on the 2D His-tag capture surface maintained a higher binding activity than those immobilized on a 2D carboxyl surface via amine coupling. The 3D His-tag capture surface has about twice the amount of immobilization capacity as the 2D His-tag capture surface, which enables a higher sensitivity for detection. His-tag capture surface can be optionally regenerated to remove the His-tagged protein as well as the analyte for the next cycle of His-tagged protein immobilization, or to only selectively remove the analyte, leaving the His-tagged protein on the surface for the next cycle of analyte binding. Furthermore, the kinetic and affinity studies of the interactions between the His-tagged protein and its interacting protein were performed. This study provides an efficient way to study protein-protein interactions by oriented and reversible immobilization of His-tagged proteins on QCM biosensor surfaces. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Pei Z.,Northwest University, China | Anderson H.,Attana | Anderson H.,Uppsala University | Myrskog A.,Attana | And 4 more authors.
Analytical Biochemistry | Year: 2010

The performance of immunosensors is highly dependent on the amount of immobilized antibodies and their remaining antigen binding capacity. In this work, a method for immobilization of antibodies on a two-dimensional carboxyl surface has been optimized using quartz crystal microbalance biosensors. We show that successful immobilization is highly dependent on surface pKa, antibody pI, and pH of immobilization buffer. By the use of EDC/sulfo-NHS (1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide) activation reagents, the effect of the intrinsic surface pKa is avoided and immobilization at very low pH is therefore possible, and this is important for immobilization of acidic proteins. Antigen binding capacity as a function of immobilization pH was studied. In most cases, the antigen binding capacity followed the immobilization response. However, the antigen-to-antibody binding ratio differed between the antibodies investigated, and for one of the antibodies the antigen binding capacity was significantly lower than expected from immobilization in a certain pH range. Tests with anti-Fc and anti-Fab2 antibodies on different antibody surfaces indicated that the orientation of the antibodies on the surface had a profound effect on the antigen binding capacity of the immobilized antibodies. © 2009 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Cambridge College, Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University and Attana
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2015

A novel approach to the study of binding thermodynamics and kinetics of carbohydrate-protein interactions on unfixed cancer cell surfaces using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor was developed, in which binding events take place at the cell surface, more closely mimicking a biologically relevant environment. In this study, colon adenocarcinoma cells (KM-12) and ovary adenocarcinoma cells (SKOV-3) grew on the optimized polystyrene-coated biosensor chip without fixation. The association and dissociation between the cell surface carbohydrates and a range of lectins, including WGA, Con A, UEA-I, GS-II, PNA and SBA, were monitored in real time and without label for evaluation of cell surface glycosylation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the interaction between lectins and cell surface glycan were studied, providing detailed information about the interactions, such as the association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, affinity constant, as well as the changes of entropy, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy. This application provides an insight into the cell surface glycosylation and the complex molecular recognition on the intact cell surface, which may have impacts on disease diagnosis and drug discovery.


PubMed | Attana, CSIC - Institute of Physical Chemistry "Rocasolano" and CIBER ISCIII
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Analytical chemistry | Year: 2016

Recognition of bacterial surface epitopes by host receptors plays an important role in the infectious process and is intimately associated with bacterial virulence. Delineation of bacteria-host interactions commonly relies on the detection of binding events between purified bacteria- and host-target molecules. In this work, we describe a combined microarray and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach for the analysis of carbohydrate-mediated interactions directly on the bacterial surface, thus preserving the native environment of the bacterial targets. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) was selected as a model pathogenic species not displaying a polysaccharide capsule or O-antigen-containing lipopolysaccharide, a trait commonly found in several important respiratory pathogens. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of NTHi microarrays for exploring the presence of carbohydrate structures on the bacterial surface. Furthermore, the microarray approach is shown to be efficient for detecting strain-selective binding of three innate immune lectins, namely, surfactant protein D, human galectin-8, and Siglec-14, to different NTHi clinical isolates. In parallel, QCM bacteria-chips were developed for the analysis of lectin-binding kinetics and affinity. This novel QCM approach involves capture of NTHi on lectin-derivatized chips followed by formaldehyde fixation, rendering the bacteria an integrated part of the sensor chip, and subsequent binding assays with label-free lectins. The binding parameters obtained for selected NTHi-lectin pairs provide further insights into the interactions occurring at the bacterial surface.

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