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Bowler R.M.,San Francisco State University | Adams S.W.,San Francisco State University | Schwarzer R.,Australian Catholic University | Schwarzer R.,University of Social Sciences and Humanities of Warsaw | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology | Year: 2017

Background: This study investigated the validity of self-reported concentration and memory problems (CMP) in residents environmentally exposed to manganese (Mn). Method: Self-report of CMP from a health questionnaire (HQ) and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) was compared to neuropsychological assessment (Trails A&B; Digit Span; Digit Symbol; Similarities; Auditory Consonant Trigrams, ACT; NAB Memory; Rey–Osterrieth, Rey–O, Delayed). Participants included 146 residents from Ohio exposed to air-Mn, with a modeled average concentration of 0.55 µg m– 3 (range = 0.01–4.58). Results: Residents were primarily White (94.5%), aged 30–64 years (M = 51.24), with a minimum of 10 years of residence (range = 10–64). Ninety-four (65.3%) participants reported concentration problems, and 107 residents (73.3%) reported memory problems. More participants endorsed CMP on the SCL-90-R than on the HQ. The prevalence of self-reported CMP was higher for women than for men (88.4% vs. 68.3%). Point-biserial and Pearson’s correlations between self-reported CMP and neuropsychological test scores were nonsignificant and weak for both the HQ (rpb = −.20 to rpb = .04) and the SCL-90-R (r = −.12 to r = .007). Greater levels of depression, anxiety, and female sex predicted having more self-reported CMP on both the HQ and the SCL-90-R. Air-Mn and blood-Mn were not associated with self-reported CMP. Residential distance from the Mn source accounted for a small proportion of variance (sr2 = .04), although depression remained the largest predictor (sr2 = .21). Conclusion: These results indicate that self-report of CMP in Mn-exposed residents appear to be invalid when compared to neuropsychological test scores. The participants’ misperception of having CMP is associated with less education and higher levels of depression. Neuropsychological assessment is recommended to attain valid results. © 2017, Routledge. All rights reserved.


Bowler R.M.,San Francisco State University | Adams S.W.,San Francisco State University | Wright C.W.,San Francisco State University | Kim Y.,University of Ulsan | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Environmental Health Research | Year: 2016

This report describes the use of medications as a proxy when medical record reviews are unavailable, to study the health effects of residents environmentally exposed to air-manganese (n = 185) compared to unexposed residents (n = 90). Participants’ current medication lists and medication questionnaire responses were collected in clinical interviews and categorized into 13 domains. Exposed participants reported fewer hours of sleep than controls (6.6 vs. 7.0). The exposed used significantly more medications than unexposed participants (82.2 % vs. 67.8 %) and, when adjusting for age, education, and personal income, also for pain (aOR = 2.40) and hypothyroidism (aOR = 7.03). Exposed participants with higher air-Mn concentrations, monitored for 10 years by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, were 1.5 times more likely to take pain medications. The exposed participants take significantly more medications than unexposed participants in the categories of hypothyroidism, pain, supplements, and total medications. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group


Bowler R.M.,San Francisco State University | Beseler C.L.,Colorado State University | Gocheva V.V.,San Francisco State University | Colledge M.,ATSDR | And 5 more authors.
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2016

Background: Manganese (Mn) inhalation has been associated with neuropsychological and neurological sequelae in exposed workers. Few environmental epidemiologic studies have examined the potentially neurotoxic effects of Mn exposure in ambient air on motor function and hand tremor in adult community residents. Mn exposed residents were recruited in two Ohio towns: Marietta, a town near a ferro-manganese smelter, and East Liverpool, a town adjacent to a facility processing, crushing, screening, and packaging Mn products. Methods: Chronic (≥. 10 years) exposure to ambient air Mn in adult residents and effects on neuropsychological and neurological outcomes were investigated. Participants from Marietta (n. = 100) and East Liverpool (n. = 86) were combined for analyses. AERMOD dispersion modeling of fixed-site outdoor air monitoring data estimated Mn inhalation over a ten year period. Adult Mn-exposed residents' psychomotor ability was assessed using Finger Tapping, Hand Dynamometer, Grooved Pegboard, and the Computerized Adaptive Testing System (CATSYS) Tremor system. Bayesian structural equation modeling was used to assess associations between air-Mn and motor function and tremor. Results: Air-Mn exposure was significantly correlated in bivariate analyses with the tremor test (CATSYS) for intensity, center frequency and harmonic index. The Bayesian path analysis model showed associations of air-Mn with the CATSYS non-dominant center frequency and harmonic index; while the Bayesian structural equation model revealed associations between air-Mn and lower Finger Tapping scores. Household income was significantly associated with motor dysfunction but not with tremor. Conclusion: Tremor and motor function were associated with higher exposure to airborne Mn. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | University of Ulsan, ATSDR, Alliant International University, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory and 3 more.
Type: | Journal: The Science of the total environment | Year: 2015

Manganese (Mn) inhalation has been associated with neuropsychological and neurological sequelae in exposed workers. Few environmental epidemiologic studies have examined the potentially neurotoxic effects of Mn exposure in ambient air on motor function and hand tremor in adult community residents. Mn exposed residents were recruited in two Ohio towns: Marietta, a town near a ferro-manganese smelter, and East Liverpool, a town adjacent to a facility processing, crushing, screening, and packaging Mn products.Chronic ( 10 years) exposure to ambient air Mn in adult residents and effects on neuropsychological and neurological outcomes were investigated. Participants from Marietta (n=100) and East Liverpool (n=86) were combined for analyses. AERMOD dispersion modeling of fixed-site outdoor air monitoring data estimated Mn inhalation over a ten year period. Adult Mn-exposed residents psychomotor ability was assessed using Finger Tapping, Hand Dynamometer, Grooved Pegboard, and the Computerized Adaptive Testing System (CATSYS) Tremor system. Bayesian structural equation modeling was used to assess associations between air-Mn and motor function and tremor.Air-Mn exposure was significantly correlated in bivariate analyses with the tremor test (CATSYS) for intensity, center frequency and harmonic index. The Bayesian path analysis model showed associations of air-Mn with the CATSYS non-dominant center frequency and harmonic index; while the Bayesian structural equation model revealed associations between air-Mn and lower Finger Tapping scores. Household income was significantly associated with motor dysfunction but not with tremor.Tremor and motor function were associated with higher exposure to airborne Mn.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

(PRWEB) January 18, 2017 -- Global public health organization NSF International has certified the first drinking water pitcher to reduce arsenic V (pentavalent arsenic) to NSF/ANSI 53: Drinking Water Treatment Units – Health Effects, an American National Standard for drinking water treatment units. This certification verifies that MicroCeramics’ NanoNose Pitcher Filter System filters the water to reduce arsenic to at or below the health advisory levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) of 10 parts per billion (ppb). NSF International also certified the Midea-NanoNose filtration cartridge, which houses the NanoNose filtration technology for pour-through water filters, to NSF/ANSI 53. Most arsenic enters the drinking water supply either from natural deposits in the earth or from industrial and agricultural pollution. According to the WHO, more than 200 million people worldwide might be chronically exposed to arsenic in drinking water. Long-term exposure can lead to chronic arsenic poisoning and to certain cancers. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has been ranking arsenic in first place on its toxic substance priority list for more than 16 years.* “Arsenic in drinking water threatens public health worldwide,” said Liangjie Dong, CEO of San Jose-based Mesofilter Inc. and NanoNose inventor. “The technology was researched, developed and refined over a period of 12 years at the University of Hawaii with the collaboration of China Medical University in Shenyang, China. We are so pleased to be able to offer the NanoNose Pitcher Filter System certified by NSF International. We will continue to innovate next-generation water filtration technology and products in our Silicon Valley headquarters.” Certification to NSF/ANSI 53: Drinking Water Treatment Units – Health Effects means that the product reduces pentavalent arsenic (or arsenic V) in drinking water to at or below 10 ppb and has been tested to ensure the safety of materials which come in contact with drinking water. Certification also includes annual facility audits of the manufacturing facility to ensure the products continue to meet the standard. “NSF International continues to protect and improve public health by certifying products worldwide that help improve the quality of drinking water,” said Clif McLellan, Vice President of Water Systems at NSF International. “NSF’s certification of the NanoNose Pitcher Filter System and Midea-NanoNose filtration cartridge to the NSF/ANSI 53 means consumers now have a verified solution to reduce pentavalent arsenic (or arsenic V) in their drinking water to 10 ppb which is set by the EPA and WHO.” NSF International offers a listing of all certified products including the NanoNose Pitcher Filter System. For more information on NSF International’s global filtration programs, contact Tina Yerkes, Director, General Manager, Water Systems at tyerkes(at)nsf(dot)org or call +1-734-418-6596. Editor’s note: For media interested in more information or to request an interview please contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at media(at)nsf(dot)org or +1 734-418-6624. For interviews with Mr. Dong in the San Francisco Bay Area and Silicon Valley, please contact Shirley Gines at sgines(at)firebrandglobal(dot)com or +1 858-395-0888. NSF International is a global independent organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the water, food, health sciences and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment (nsf.org). Founded in 1944, NSF is committed to protecting human health and safety worldwide. Operating in more than 165 countries, NSF International is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and Indoor Environment. NSF International led the development of the American National Standards for all materials and products that treat or come in contact with drinking water. In 1990, the U.S. EPA replaced its own drinking water product advisory program with these NSF standards. Today, most major plumbing codes require certification to NSF standards for pipes and plumbing components in commercial and residential buildings. MicroCeramics LTD, headquartered in Nanopolis, Suzhou, China, manufactures the first-generation MicroNose and second-generation NanoNose products for solving arsenic and heavy metal filtration challenges in water. The third-generation technology, MesoNose, will be manufactured in San Jose, California. *Reference links for WHO and ATSDR World health Organization (WHO): http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/92/8/13-128496/en/


Chou S.,ATSDR
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2010

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's (ATSDR) mission is to serve the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and disease related to toxic substances. A discussion on ATSDR activities on H 2S health effects covers the Priority List of Hazardous Substances; determining levels of exposure that present a significant risk to human health; research areas with data gaps; public health assessment; health consultations; and exposure investigation; and sources of H 2S, e.g., oil fields. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 103rd AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (Calgary, Alberta, Canada 6/22-25/2010).

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