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Riera R.,Atlantic Environmental Research Center | Monterroso O.,Atlantic Environmental Research Center | Rodriguez M.,Atlantic Environmental Research Center | Ramos E.,Atlantic Environmental Research Center
Chemistry and Ecology | Year: 2011

Environmental effects of enlargement works in Puerto Calero (Lanzarote, Canary Islands) were analysed in the sediments using abiotic variables (total hydrocarbons, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, organic matter and granulometry) and three biotic indexes (AMBI, M-AMBI and BENTIX). A before-after/control- impact (BACI) design was developed with four sampling campaigns, before (November 2004), during (March and July 2005) and after (July 2006) works. Inner stations were characterised by high concentrations of pollutants (total hydrocarbons and polyaromatic hydrocarbons). A temporal trend (2004-2006) was observed in macrofaunal assemblage structure, and thus in AMBI, M-AMBI and BENTIX indexes. Macrobenthic assemblages also mirrored the pollution gradient, with bioindicator species in inner stations (the polychaete Pseudopolydora paucibranchiata and the mollusc Abra alba), sensitive species (the sipunculid Aspidosiphon muelleri, the crustacean Pariambus typicus and the polychaete Aponuphis bilineata) in outer stations and ubiquitous species (the polychaetes Aricidea assimilis and Armandia polyophthalma) in both stations (inner and outer). © 2011 Taylor & Francis. Source


Riera R.,Atlantic Environmental Research Center | Monterroso O.,Atlantic Environmental Research Center | Rodriguez M.,Atlantic Environmental Research Center | Ramos E.,Atlantic Environmental Research Center | Sacramento A.,Atlantic Environmental Research Center
Aquatic Ecology | Year: 2011

In our six-year study, we investigated the dynamics of the meiofaunal community directly under the influence of a fish farm, in adjacent areas and in control areas outside the fish farm influence. Our data showed spatial, seasonal and annual variation in the meiofaunal community under the influence of the fish farm; however, no clear trend is discernible. Copepods are positively associated with mud and very fine sands, which seem to increase with time under the fish farm and adjacent areas, particularly in summer. As shown throughout the study period, copepods could soon take over other components of the community, resulting in a community shift. Our approach to investigate the dynamics of a community with a quick response to environmental changes proves useful to detect early-stage deviations from non-affected areas, which could be critical to distinguish environmental impacts before they cause major shifts in the environment. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. Source

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