Athletic Training Program

United States

Athletic Training Program

United States
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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The 2017 Pennsylvania Athletic Trainers’ Society (PATS) Athletic Training Student Symposium hosted by East Stroudsburg University (ESU) began on the evening of March 31s with welcoming remarks from Dr. Marcia Welsh, President of ESU, and Gerard Rozea, Program Director of ESU’s Athletic Training Program. Athletic training students from 12 athletic training programs from across the Commonwealth were then able to network with their peers, professors and other members of PATS during a welcome social. In addition to enjoying pizza, networking and a photo booth, athletic training students participated in Can Jam competitions, singing and dancing. During the second day of the symposium, athletic training students attended multiple presentations ranging from topics in sports nutrition, sports psychology, concussions, equipment removal, advanced functional movement screening, interviewing skills, sacroiliac dysfunction, suturing techniques and leukotaping. The presentations were a collaboration from the Athletic Training and Exercise Science Departments of ESU and other professionals throughout northeast Pennsylvania. In addition to the clinical breakout sessions, attendees were able to learn from their peers through presentations by fellow students. John D. Vineyard from Slippery Rock University presented “Correlation Between Heart Rate and Core Body Temperature in Collegiate Long-distance Runners During Practices in a Hot, Humid Environment. Shawn Fliszar, athletic training student from Moravian College, presented “Tibialis Anterior Rupture in a Collegiate Basketball Player. Two students from ESU presented. Matthew Hugg presented “When Guts Prevent Gusto: Sigmoid Volvulus in a 21 year-old Basketball Player” and Nicole Koniarz presented “Breathing Through a Straw: A Collegiate Swimmer with Cystic Fibrosis”. East Stroudsburg University appreciated all of the hours, hard work and volunteering to make the entire symposium a success. For more information regarding this topic or to schedule an interview with PATS President Gaetano Sanchioli, MS, LAT, ATC, PES (president(at)gopats(dot)org), please contact Linda Mazzoli, MS, LAT, ATC, PATS Executive Director at patsexecutivedirection(at)gopats(dot)org. The Pennsylvania Athletic Trainers Society, Inc is a progressive organization of licensed healthcare professionals who work under the direction of a licensed physician. Our society continues to increase public awareness and education regarding Athletic Trainers and the Athletic Training profession while serving as the premier source of information for public safety, injury and illness prevention, early intervention, patient care, and healthcare delivery for the physically active in the Commonwealth.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

To begin National Athletic Training Month, a group of PATS members and students traveled to New York City and braved the elements to stand outside The Today Show at Rockefeller Plaza and Good Morning America in Times Square on March 3rd. These groups used signs and banners to promote National Athletic Training Month. Some of the hosts (Al Roker and Michael Strahan) posed for pictures. This event has become a much enjoyed, long lasting and favorite tradition to kick off National Athletic Training Month.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Next, PATS also took to the airwaves. PATS members Jeff Shields and Larry Cooper joined Michael Parks from iHeart radio for the radio show “Taking Care of Business” that aired March 18th. In addition to the information about athletic training education and ongoing training needed to be a licensed athletic trainer in Pennsylvania, they discussed the duties of athletic trainers and the role they play on the sidelines. Shields and Cooper had tips and advice for parents to keep their student-athlete safe along with a discussion about the many ways that the PATS is working with the Pennsylvania State Legislature to help keep student-athletes safe. They also discussed the importance of preventing and treating concussions. This show was aired on the iHeart radio app, online at http://www.whp580.com and on a podcast. In sticking with the “Your Protection is Our Priority” theme of 2017 National Athletic Training Month, PATS invested in billboard advertisement throughout the commonwealth to promote concussion education via the ConcussionWise training program. This program provides culturally competent, skills-based traumatic brain injury trainings to parents, coaches and physicians involved with youth athletes. PATS utilized funds they received from a grant provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Health to provide free concussion education throughout the Commonwealth for physicians, physician assistants, coaches, parents and athletes participating in youth sports. Winter storm Stella may have postponed the annual Hike to Harrisburg event, but the PATS Executive Board found other ways to establish PATS presence in Harrisburg. In lieu of the Hike to Harrisburg, PATS President Guy Sanchioli and President-Elect George Roberts attended the Freshman Breakfast sponsored by the Winter Group (PATS lobbyist group) at the state Capitol. This breakfast was an opportunity for freshman legislators to be introduced to many medical groups from the Commonwealth and to discuss hot topic issues. This breakfast was also a great event for PATS to network with other medical professionals within the Commonwealth. Before the breakfast, Sanchioli and Roberts were able to attend a reception for Representative Dan Miller of Allegheny County. Representative Miller discussed mental health issues of athletes as well as medical issues for the tactical athlete. Representative Miller expressed support in PATS efforts on both of these issues. Sanchioli and Roberts were also able to meet with Representatives Ed Gainey of Allegheny County and Ryan Bizzarro of Erie County to help schedule ConcussionWise presentations in their respective areas. These meetings demonstrate the importance PATS places on maintaining a positive and on-going working relationship with those legislators in the Commonwealth. Lastly, PATS public relations committee sponsored a student public relations contest. Students from athletic training programs across the Commonwealth had the opportunity to promote the profession of athletic training and National Athletic Training Month based on the “Your Protection is Our Priority” theme. The contest was opened to any accredited Pennsylvania Athletic Training Program. This contest challenged students to be creative with videos, presentations, public service announcements, posters, etc. The winners of the contest won a monetary prize and will be honored at the 2017 PATS Annual Symposium in Erie, PA in June. For more information regarding this topic or to schedule an interview with PATS President Gaetano Sanchioli, MS, LAT, ATC, PES (president(at)gopats(dot)org), please contact Linda Mazzoli, MS, LAT, ATC, PATS Executive Director at patsexecutivedirection(at)gopats(dot)org. The Pennsylvania Athletic Trainers Society, Inc is a progressive organization of licensed healthcare professionals who work under the direction of a licensed physician. Our society continues to increase public awareness and education regarding Athletic Trainers and the Athletic Training profession while serving as the premier source of information for public safety, injury and illness prevention, early intervention, patient care, and healthcare delivery for the physically active in the Commonwealth. “The Keystone to a Healthy and Physically Active Life”


Snyder Valier A.R.,Athletic Training Program | Swank E.M.,Athletic Training Program | Lam K.C.,A.T. Still University | Hansen M.L.,CORE Institute | Valovich McLeod T.C.,Athletic Training Program
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation | Year: 2013

Accurate assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is important for quality patient care. Evaluation of HRQoL typically occurs with patient self-report, but some instruments, such as the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL), allow for proxy reporting. Limited information exists comparing patient and proxy reports of HRQoL after sport-related injury in adolescent athletes. Objective: To compare patient ratings and parent-proxy ratings of HRQoL in adolescent athletes who suffer musculoskeletal injuries requiring orthopedic consultation. The authors hypothesized poor agreement between patient and parent-proxy ratings of HRQoL. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Orthopedic practice. Patients: Thirteen adolescent patients with a sport-related musculoskeletal injury requiring orthopedic consultation and 1 of their parents participated. Interventions: During the initial visit to the physician's office, each patient was asked to complete the PedsQL, and the patient's parent was asked to complete the parent-proxy version of the PedsQL. Main Outcome Measurements: The PedsQL is a pediatric generic outcome measure that consists of a total score and 4 subscale scores: physical, emotional, social, and school functioning. Means and standard deviations were calculated for all scores, and comparisons between patient-self report and parent-proxy ratings of HRQoL were made for the PedsQL total score and subscale scores using Pearson product-moment correlations (r). Results: Pearson product-moment correlations showed little to fair insignificant relationships between patient self-report and parent-proxy report of the PedsQL for the total score (r = -.1) and all subscales (range r = .1 to .4). Conclusions: Our results suggest a lack of agreement between patient and parent-proxy ratings of HRQoL, with patients rating their HRQoL lower than their parent. Patient perception of HRQoL may be more accurate than proxy report, which supports the use of patient-rated HRQoL in patient evaluation. Assessments of HRQoL made by proxies, even those close to the patient, may not represent patient health status. © 2013 Human Kinetics, Inc.


May J.,Athletic Training Program | Krzyzanowicz R.,Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts | Nasypany A.,The College of Idaho | Baker R.,The College of Idaho | Seegmiller J.,The College of Idaho
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation | Year: 2015

Context: Although randomized controlled trials indicate that the Mulligan Concept (MC) of mobilization with movement can improve Pain-Free grip strength and pressure pain threshold in patients with lateral epicondylalgia of the elbow, improve ankle dorsiflexion in patients with subacute ankle sprains, and decrease the signs and symptoms of patients with cervicogenic headache, little is known about the clinical application, use, and profile of certified Mulligan practitioners (CMPs) in America. Objective: To better understand the use and value of applying the MC philosophy in Clinical-Care environments from the perspective of American CMPs while establishing a clinical profile of a CMP. Design: Quantitative descriptive design. Setting: Online survey instrument. Participants: American CMPs. Data Collection and Analysis: Online survey instrument. Results: CMPs use the MC to treat a broad spectrum of spinal and peripheral clinical pathologies in primarily outpatient clinics with an active and athletic population. American CMPs also find value in the MC. Conclusions: American CMPs continue to use and find value in the MC intervention strategy to treat a broad spectrum of spinal and peripheral conditions in their clinical practices. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.


PubMed | Athletic Training Program
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of athletic training | Year: 2015

Very few women have leadership positions in athletic training (ie, head athletic training positions) in intercollegiate athletics. Research exists on the barriers to attaining the role; however, our understanding about the experiences of those currently engaged in the role is limited.To examine the experiences of female head athletic trainers as they worked toward and attained the position of head athletic trainer.Qualitative study.National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting.Eight female athletic trainers serving in the role of head athletic trainer participated in our study. The mean age of the participants was 45 12 years, with 5 1.5 years of experience in the role of head athletic trainer and 21 10 years of experience as athletic trainers.We conducted phone interviews with the 8 participants following a semistructured format. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed following a general inductive approach as described by Thomas. To establish credibility, we used a peer reviewer, member checks, and multiple-analyst triangulation.Six major themes emerged from our analysis regarding the experiences of female head athletic trainers. Opportunities to become a head athletic trainer, leadership qualities, and unique personal characteristics were discussed as factors leading to the assumption of the role of the head athletic trainer. Where women hold back, family challenges, and organizational barriers speak to the potential obstacles to assuming the role of head athletic trainer.Female head athletic trainers did not seek the role, but through persistence and encouragement, they find themselves assuming the role. Leadership skills were discussed as important for success in the role of head athletic trainer. Life balancing and parenting were identified as barriers to women seeking the role of head athletic trainer.

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