Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Edmonton, Canada

ATCO Electric is an electric utility company. Based in Edmonton, Alberta, ATCO Electric transmits and distributes electricity to two thirds of Alberta, namely in north and east-central Alberta, as well as communities in the Yukon and North West Territories.ATCO Electric is owned by Canadian Utilities, which is in turn controlled by ATCO, and its main subsidiaries are: ATCO Electric Yukon Northland Utilities, with its subsidiary Northland Utilities .ATCO Electric is one of four electrical transmission and distribution utilities in Alberta: EPCOR, formerly Edmonton Power FortisAlberta Inc., owned by Fortis Inc. AltaLink, based in Calgary Wikipedia.


Baker J.,ATCO Electric | McGee T.K.,University of Alberta
Society and Natural Resources | Year: 2016

Backcountry recreationists in Canada are exposed to avalanche risks. Snowmobilers now make up a large proportion of backcountry recreationalists. This article presents results of a qualitative study of backcountry snowmobilers in western Canada. The Theory of Planned Behavior guided our examination of snowmobilers’ avalanche related information seeking and use of recommended preparedness equipment. Participating snowmobilers sought information from a variety of information sources before and during a snowmobiling trip, and some participants had taken a safety training course. Information seeking before and during snowmobiling trips was influenced by attitudes toward information sources, and taking a safety course was influenced by motivations to perform the behavior, attitudes toward the courses, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms from snowmobiling club members. All participants reported carrying recommended safety equipment (transceiver, probe, and metal shovel) at all times when snowmobiling in the backcountry. Carrying the recommended preparedness tools was influenced by participants’ attitudes toward the tools and subjective norms. © 2016, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Source


Wang Y.F.,ATCO Electric | Li Y.W.,University of Alberta
IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics | Year: 2013

Single-phase grid-connected converters are widely used in many applications such as photovoltaics, fuel cells, active power filters, etc. An important topic for the development of their control schemes is ac signal detection, such as grid phase detection for grid-interfacing inverters, and harmonic detection for harmonic compensation devices. Since only one signal is available, the task is more difficult than in three-phase systems. Among the existing methods, the frequency-domain ones are known to have a one-cycle delay and heavier computational burden. Meanwhile, the time-domain methods often rely on phase-locked loop, quadrature signal generation, and complex filtering techniques; the resulted multiple-looped system may suffer from slow transients and stability issues. This paper proposes a new detection method based on anticonjugate harmonic decomposition and cascaded delayed signal cancellation. The method uses constant zero as the quadrature signal, and has a completely open-looped structure. The resulted detection system is very simple and robust. The fundamental and harmonic detection transients can be as short as 0.47 cycle in most cases, or 1.5 cycles for cases with considerable frequency variations. Meanwhile, zero steady-state error can be guaranteed in complicated harmonic scenarios, including all typical single-phase system harmonics. The performance of the proposed detection method is verified by experiments. © 1986-2012 IEEE. Source


Wang Y.F.,ATCO Electric | Li Y.W.,University of Alberta
2012 IEEE Energy Conversion Congress and Exposition, ECCE 2012 | Year: 2012

Single-phase grid-connected converters are widely used in many applications, such as photovoltaics, fuel cells, active power filters, etc. An important topic for the development of their control schemes is ac signal detection, such as grid phase detection for grid-interfacing inverters, and harmonic detection for harmonic compensation devices. Since only one ac signal is available, the task is more difficult than in three-phase systems. Among the existing methods, the frequency-domain ones are known to have a one-cycle delay and heavier computational burden. Meanwhile, the time-domain methods often rely on phase-locked loop, quadrature signal generation and complex filtering techniques; the resulted multiple-looped system may suffer from slow transients and stability issues. This paper proposes a new detection method based on anti-conjugate harmonic decomposition and cascaded delayed signal cancellation. The method uses constant zero as the quadrature signal, and has a completely open-looped structure. The resulted detection system is very simple and robust. The fundamental and harmonic detection transients can be as short as 0.47 cycle, while zero steady-state error can be guaranteed in complicated harmonic scenarios, including all typical single-phase system harmonics. The performance of the proposed detection method is verified by experimental results. © 2012 IEEE. Source


Mazin H.E.,University of Alberta | Nino E.E.,ATCO Electric | Xu W.,University of Alberta | Yong J.,China University of Technology
IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery | Year: 2011

This paper presents a measurement technique to determine the harmonic sources and impedances of residential houses at the utility metering point. The results are then applied to quantify harmonic and current contributions of the residential premises. Four residential houses are investigated by using the proposed method. The characteristics of the load-side harmonic impedances and sources are studied, and their harmonic contributions are determined. The results show that voltage distortion is affected mainly by background harmonic sources that exist within the supply system. The current harmonics are affected by the residential loads and the supply system. © 2011 IEEE. Source


Ayres H.M.,ATCO Electric | Salles D.,University of Campinas | Freitas W.,University of Campinas
IEEE Transactions on Power Systems | Year: 2014

Power losses estimation under time-varying distributed generation (DG) conditions usually demands several power flow simulations, which is a time-consuming task. To handle this issue, this paper proposes a method that uses the information of only one (base case) power flow to estimate the total power losses of distribution networks for any new DG condition. The method is based on the second-order power flow sensitivities, which are suitable to model the nonlinear nature of power losses. As a result, the method has the potential to speed up the solution of power losses reduction optimization problems, such as DG allocation problems, in which several DG configurations need to be considered. Moreover, a practical index is proposed to quantify the responsibility of each DG for the total power losses in a multi-DG scenario. The test results verified the validity of the proposed concept and method. © 1969-2012 IEEE. Source

Discover hidden collaborations