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News Article | August 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ARLINGTON, Va., August 2, 2017 -- The American Society for Radiation Oncology has selected 23 distinguished members to receive the ASTRO Fellow designation. The 2017 class of Fellows will be recognized during the Awards Ceremony at ASTRO's 59th Annual Meeting, to be held September 24-27 in San Diego. The Fellows Program, started in 2006, honors those that have been an Active, Emeritus or International member of ASTRO for at least 15 years, have given the equivalent of 10 years of service to ASTRO and have made significant contributions to the field of radiation oncology in the areas of research, education, patient care or service and leadership. Including the 2017 class of Fellows, 292 of ASTRO's more than 10,000 members worldwide have received the FASTRO designation. "The impact that this group of dedicated individuals has had on the field of radiation oncology is immense," says ASTRO Chair David C. Beyer, MD, FASTRO. "On behalf of ASTRO, I commend and thank these 23 outstanding physicians and medical physicists for their far-reaching contributions over the years--through research and patient care--to our specialty and the fight against cancer." Candidates must be nominated by a current ASTRO Fellow, accompanied by three letters of support from a selected subset of ASTRO members. A committee reviews all nominations and presents a slate to ASTRO's Board of Directors for approval. ASTRO's 59th Annual Meeting, the nation's premier scientific meeting in radiation oncology, will be held September 24-27 at the San Diego Convention Center. The 2017 Annual Meeting is expected to attract more than 11,000 attendees from across the globe, including oncologists from all disciplines and members of the entire radiation oncology team. Led by ASTRO President Brian D. Kavanagh, MD, FASTRO, the 2017 meeting's theme is "The Healing Art and Science of Radiation Oncology," and it will feature keynote addresses from Richard D. Zane, MD, chief innovation officer for the UCHealth System; Lucy Kalanithi, MD, the widow of Paul Kalanithi, MD, who wrote the bestselling memoir, "When Breath Becomes Air," and Heather Wakelee, MD, Dr. Paul Kalanithi's oncologist; and Vinay K. Prasad, MD, MPH, a hematologist-oncologist who co-wrote the book, "Ending Medical Reversal: Improving Outcomes, Saving Lives." The Presidential Symposium is in three parts: "The Scientific State of the Art," "the Art of Quality" and "The Quality of Mercy." These sessions will focus on cutting-edge science, measuring quality in radiation oncology and quality of life issues. ASTRO's four-day scientific meeting will feature more than 2,800 abstracts sharing results from clinical trials and other research studies, in conjunction with more than 50 educational sessions and 24 scientific panels. More than 200 exhibitors will demonstrate cutting-edge technology and medical device innovations for radiation oncology. For more information about ASTRO's 59th Annual Meeting, visit http://www. . For press registration and news briefing information for ASTRO's 59th Annual Meeting, visit http://www. . For more information, contact Liz Gardner, Media Relations Manager, or Leah Kerkman Fogarty, Communications Manager. ASTRO is the premier radiation oncology society in the world, with more than 11,000 members who are physicians, nurses, biologists, physicists, radiation therapists, dosimetrists and other health care professionals that specialize in treating patients with radiation therapies. As the leading organization in radiation oncology, the Society is dedicated to improving patient care through professional education and training, support for clinical practice and health policy standards, advancement of science and research, and advocacy. ASTRO publishes three medical journals, International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics and Practical Radiation Oncology and Advances in Radiation Oncology; developed and maintains an extensive patient website, http://www. ; and created the Radiation Oncology Institute, a non-profit foundation to support research and education efforts around the world that enhance and confirm the critical role of radiation therapy in improving cancer treatment. To learn more about ASTRO, visit http://www. .


News Article | July 13, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ARLINGTON, Va., July 13, 2017 -- The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has issued an update to its recommendations for medical insurance coverage regarding the use of proton beam therapy to treat cancer. The updated Proton Beam Therapy Model Policy provides guidance to payers on clinical indications that are appropriate for treatment with proton therapy and should be covered by health insurance, including Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance. Proton beam therapy is an advanced type of external-beam radiation therapy that uses proton rather than photon beams to deliver radiation doses to a tumor. Proton therapy offers a high degree of precision, which allows radiation oncologists to target an escalated dose of radiation directly on a tumor and spare nearby healthy tissue. Proton therapy is particularly beneficial for patients with tumors that are near critical structures, such as lung tumors near the heart. Based on new evidence published since the original policy was issued in 2014, the updated model policy outlines two categories of appropriate clinical indications, or diagnoses, for proton beam therapy. For indications in Group 1, coverage is recommended; for Group 2, coverage is recommended if additional requirements (outlined below) are met. Disease sites were assigned to one of the two categories based on evidence in published clinical data and current Medicare coverage. Group 1 indications, or the clinical scenarios that frequently support the use of proton therapy based on medical necessity and published clinical data, were updated with five additions and one modification. Group 1 indications, with additions marked by asterisks, include: * Malignant and benign primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors* * Cancers of the paranasal sinuses and other accessory sinuses* * Hepatocellular cancer (no longer required to be treated in a hypofractionated regimen*) * Tumors that approach or are located at the base of skull, including but not limited to chordoma and chondrosarcomas * Primary or metastatic tumors of the spine where the spinal cord tolerance may be exceeded with conventional treatment or where the spinal cord has previously been irradiated * Primary or benign solid tumors in children treated with curative intent and occasional palliative treatment of childhood tumors when one of the criteria noted above apply * Patients with genetic syndromes making total volume of radiation minimization crucial, such as but not limited to NF-1 patients and retinoblastoma patients The policy recommends coverage for Group 2 indications if the patient is enrolled in either an Institutional Research Board (IRB)-approved study or in a multi-institutional registry adhering to Medicare requirements for Coverage with Evidence Development (CED). These indications also represent the disease sites for which evidence is accumulating and may support future Group 1 coverage. While the policy specifies that no indications are deemed inappropriate for CED, it also specifies several systems for Group 2 indications: "Recent research has expanded our understanding of the types of malignancies and clinical scenarios where proton beam therapy is most advantageous. This policy update reflects the most current knowledge regarding which patients will benefit from--and therefore should have access to--this cutting-edge treatment," said ASTRO Chair David C. Beyer, MD, FASTRO. "We also remain firmly committed to developing evidence to identify new areas where this technology might be beneficial as well as situations where it is not needed." The model policy update was developed by ASTRO's Payer Relations Subcommittee, reviewed by the Health Policy Council and then approved by the Board of Directors in June 2017. Model policies differ from practice guidelines, which are written for physicians and outline recommendations to optimize clinical care. ASTRO also provides model policies for brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). ASTRO is the premier radiation oncology society in the world, with more than 11,000 members who are physicians, nurses, biologists, physicists, radiation therapists, dosimetrists and other health care professionals that specialize in treating patients with radiation therapies. As the leading organization in radiation oncology, the Society is dedicated to improving patient care through professional education and training, support for clinical practice and health policy standards, advancement of science and research, and advocacy. ASTRO publishes three medical journals, International Journal of Radiation Oncology  Biology  Physics and Practical Radiation Oncology and Advances in Radiation Oncology; developed and maintains an extensive patient website, http://www. ; and created the Radiation Oncology Institute, a non-profit foundation to support research and education efforts around the world that enhance and confirm the critical role of radiation therapy in improving cancer treatment. To learn more about ASTRO, visit http://www. .


Analysis of more than 12,000 patients reveals similar survival rates following a bladder-preserving combination of radiation therapy, chemotherapy and transurethral resection as with radical bladder removal surgery ARLINGTON, Va., May 31, 2017 - A meta-analysis of previously published cancer research showed no difference in five-year and 10-year survival rates between patients who underwent radical cystectomy, which is the surgical removal of the bladder, and a bladder-preserving combined modality treatment (CMT) plan, which combines radiation therapy, chemotherapy and the removal of the bladder tumor. The study is published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics, the flagship journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. With muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), when the cancer has invaded the muscle layer of the bladder wall, radical cystectomy (RC) is currently the standard course of treatment, with CMT reserved as a secondary option for patients not healthy enough for RC. There are drawbacks to undergoing a radical cystectomy, however--namely that additional surgery is needed after removal of the bladder to reconstruct a way to store urine, either inside or outside of the body. Combined modality treatment--consisting of radiation therapy, concurrent chemotherapy and maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor-- provides an alternative to complete bladder removal for patients with MIBC. This approach could potentially be considered as a first course of treatment for many patients, say the study's authors--not just for those patients with significant comorbidities. "These results provide compelling evidence suggesting radiation therapy may be as good as surgery for many of these patients," said Dharam Kaushik, MD, senior author of the study and an assistant professor at The University of Texas Health Science Center, now called UT Health San Antonio, and the UT Health Cancer Center. "We hope this study will help patients and their physicians understand the full range of options available when planning treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer." Researchers comprehensively reviewed 19 published studies encompassing 12,380 patients, of which eight prospective and retrospective studies encompassing 9,554 patients were eligible for the meta-analysis. Eligible studies directly compared one or more survival outcome between the two treatment approaches (i.e., radical cystectomy or combined therapy including radiation). Researchers computed hazard ratios (HR) to compare survival outcomes including overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and progression-free survival (PFS) at five and 10 years' post-treatment. The researchers found no difference in OS at five years' post-treatment (HR, 0.96, favoring CMT; p = 0.778; four studies, 452 patients) or 10 years (HR, 1.02, favoring RC; p = 0.905; five studies, 9,295 patients). They also found no difference in DSS at five years (HR, 0.83, favoring CMT; p = 0.390; two studies, 326 patients) or 10 years (HR, 1.17, favoring RC; p = 0.264; four studies, 9,171 patients). At 10 years, post-treatment, they found no difference in PFS (HR, 0.85, favoring CMT; p = 0.639; two studies, 293 patients). There were no studies that examined PFS at five years' post-treatment. "According to our analyses, patients undergoing radical cystectomy likely share no cancer survival benefits compared with patients receiving chemoradiation-based bladder preservation therapy," said Dr. Kaushik. These findings--that a less-invasive treatment option may be sufficient--are encouraging for those with MIBC. And while the researchers say that bladder-preserving treatment, such as CMT, may be an option for more patients, they say it also highlights the need for more studies specifically comparing the two modalities. "Further research is needed to evaluate these two treatment arms--radical cystectomy versus combined modality treatment--to identify optimal treatments for specific patients," said Dr. Kaushik. Based on the results published in the journal article, Dr. Kaushik and his team have launched a pilot clinical research study of 30 patients with MIBC. Half will be treated with RC and half will be treated with CMT, including radiation therapy. The trial is currently enrolling patients. For more information or a copy of the full study, contract ASTRO's media relations team. For the study abstract, visit http://www.redjournal.org/article/S0360-3016(16)33549-0/abstract. For more information about the Red Journal, visit http://www. . ASTRO is the premier radiation oncology society in the world, with more than 11,000 members who are physicians, nurses, biologists, physicists, radiation therapists, dosimetrists and other health care professionals that specialize in treating patients with radiation therapies. As the leading organization in radiation oncology, the Society is dedicated to improving patient care through professional education and training, support for clinical practice and health policy standards, advancement of science and research, and advocacy. ASTRO publishes three medical journals, International Journal of Radiation Oncology  Biology  Physics and Practical Radiation Oncology and Advances in Radiation Oncology; developed and maintains an extensive patient website, http://www. ; and created the Radiation Oncology Institute, a non-profit foundation to support research and education efforts around the world that enhance and confirm the critical role of radiation therapy in improving cancer treatment. To learn more about ASTRO, visit http://www. .


News Article | July 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

White Wolf Capital LLC (“White Wolf”) is pleased to announce that its newly formed platform company, Consolidated Machine & Tool Holdings, LLC (“CMTH”) has acquired a majority stake in Astro-Tek Industries, Inc. (“Astro-Tek” or the “Company”). Details of the transaction were not disclosed. Elie Azar, Managing Director of White Wolf, noted “We are excited to partner with the team at Astro-Tek. The transaction will provide access to additional capital and resources to support further growth.” "I am very excited to partner with White Wolf. The team at White Wolf have significant experience with manufacturing companies and an extensive network in the defense industry. I am looking forward to working with my new capital partners to help facilitate and support our growth efforts as we enter a new phase for the Company," said Terry Smith, President. Astro-Tek is a manufacturing company that creates and builds specialized equipment used by Tier 1 aerospace and defense companies to manufacture, test, maintain, and service aircraft, satellites, rockets, and missiles. Astro-Tek is known for its ability to produce complicated products made of hard and soft metals that require in-house designing, laser cutting, machining, welding, assembly, testing, and painting. Astro-Tek is based in Anaheim, California. For further information, please visit: http://www.astro-tek.io. CMTH was formed by White Wolf in March 2017 as a Delaware limited liability company. CMTH is a special purpose entity that was formed to acquire U.S. manufacturing businesses with revenues of $5 million to $25 million specializing in precision machining, fabrication, assembly, and design of highly engineered components for the aerospace and defense industries. White Wolf is a private investment firm that began operations in late 2011 and is focused on management buyouts, recapitalizations and investments in leading middle market companies. In general, White Wolf seeks investment opportunities in companies that are headquartered in North America with $10 million to $100 million in revenues and up to $10 million in EBITDA. Preferred industries include: manufacturing, business services, information technology, security, aerospace and defense. For further information, please visit: http://www.whitewolfcapital.com.


News Article | June 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ARLINGTON, Va., June 27, 2017 --The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is pleased to announce the 2017 ASTRO Gold Medalists. Søren M. Bentzen, DSc, PhD; Louis B. Harrison, MD, FASTRO; and Michael L. Steinberg, MD, FASTRO, have been awarded the highest honor bestowed upon ASTRO members. They will be recognized for their achievements at an awards ceremony during ASTRO's 59th Annual Meeting in San Diego, taking place September 24-27, 2017. ASTRO awards its annual Gold Medal to individuals who have made outstanding lifetime contributions in the field of radiation oncology, including achievements in clinical patient care, research, teaching and service to the profession. In the award's 41st consecutive year, the new awardees join an exclusive class of 81 Gold Medalists selected over the decades from the Society's more than 10,000 members. "It is a privilege to bestow the ASTRO Gold Medal upon these three great men, who have all contributed to the specialty in a myriad of ways," said ASTRO Board of Directors Chair David C. Beyer, MD, FASTRO. "Honoring these colleagues is a highlight of my role as Board Chair, made even more so by the fact that they are selected for this highest accolade by their peers." Søren M. Bentzen, DSc, PhD, is passionate about science and math. By the numbers, this passion has led to more than 400 published articles, around 1,400 scientific citations per year, more than 300 invited talks at international scientific meetings, 54 visiting professorships, 15 trial steering committee memberships and four clinical trial or research group chairmanships. With stats like those, it's no wonder that his nominating letters for the ASTRO Gold Medal contained descriptions of Dr. Bentzen like, "leader in the field," "one of the top scientists" and "preeminent researcher in the world." Dr. Bentzen is currently a professor and director of the Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. He holds a secondary faculty appointment there as a professor of radiation oncology and is a member of the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center, as well. After earning his doctorate in medicine and medical physics from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, Dr. Bentzen was a visiting scientist at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1987-1988. While in Houston, he studied under radiation oncology stalwarts, such as Howard Thames, PhD, FASTRO, Lester Peters, MD, FASTRO, and K. Kian Ang, MD, PhD, FASTRO, all ASTRO Gold Medalists themselves. From there, he held appointments at University of Aarhus, the Gray Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin before taking the post at University of Maryland. "I came into this field at a great time," said Dr. Bentzen. "Radiation therapy has undergone quite a renaissance. The progress we've made in understanding radiation biology and molecular cancer biology has revolutionized the way radiation oncology is practiced." Indeed, Dr. Bentzen has played a large role in that understanding. For years, he has studied the long-term effects of normal tissue toxicity as a result of radiation treatment. According to one nominating letter, "Søren's work on normal tissue injury is probably the most important work of this type in the radiation oncology literature." This work led him to consider dose-fractionation schedules and how radiation therapy might be best tailored to maximize tumor control while minimizing toxicity to normal tissue. In another nominating letter, the writer concludes, "His work on modeling and fractionation have been essential to how we can use radiation safely in the clinic." Dr. Bentzen is now focusing on a new frontier of cancer care: personalized medicine using big data to better tailor treatments. He said, "At the end of the day, it's about optimizing the treatment for each individual. There are so many new possibilities that we didn't have 15 years ago. With population-level registry data and electronic health records and then with what we know about genomics--combining data and knowledge across all of those fields is challenging and also very exciting." Louis B. Harrison, MD, FASTRO, is a renaissance man of radiation oncology. From developing a customized high-dose-rate (HDR) radiation therapy applicator to writing a textbook to leading multidisciplinary teams, Dr. Harrison's accomplishments in the field are varied and far-reaching. Dr. Harrison began his medical career in surgery, receiving the Clarence Dennis Society Prize for Surgical Scholarship for the State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate College of Medicine's class of 1982. But he soon switched paths to radiation oncology, saying, "I thought radiation oncology had the best opportunity for curing cancer while optimizing functional outcome and quality of life." His surgical background has proven effective for forging partnerships with clinicians across all oncologic specialties. As more people see the value in multidisciplinary cancer care, Dr. Harrison gladly welcomes them to the club--he has been a leader in comprehensive cancer care for decades. "Radiation oncology is one of those specialties that mixes strongly with many other areas--surgery, medical oncology, imaging, pathology, genomics, immunology, biology, mathematics--but none of us can cure cancer by ourselves," said Dr. Harrison. From 1999-2014, he served as the Physician-in-Chief of Continuum Cancer Centers of New York and was instrumental in developing multidisciplinary programs across all cancer sites in the Continuum health care system. Under his leadership, the cancer program received Gold Level Accreditation for the Continuum Network from the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer, one of the few health systems to earn this level of accreditation. Dr. Harrison's desire to treat cancer while preserving function led him to specialize in head and neck and skin cancers. "In head and neck and skin cancer, radiation therapy is used as a primary modality. The aspiration to achieve excellent functional and cosmetic outcomes is very important to patients." Dr. Harrison is an authority in the field of head and neck and skin cancer: he literally wrote the book on it. Dr. Harrison is the lead editor of the major textbook, "Head and Neck Cancer: A Multidisciplinary Approach," currently in its fourth edition. According to one of Dr. Harrison's nominating letters, "his contributions in brachytherapy and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) have shaped the field." Developing novel therapies and new ways to deliver treatment has always been a motivator for Dr. Harrison. He was one of the first investigators to combine concomitant chemotherapy with radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, now a standard of care. Along with Lowell Anderson, DSc, and Felix Mick, Dr. Harrison created the Harrison Anderson Mick (HAM) Applicator, a medical device used to deliver HDR brachytherapy or HDR IORT treatments. Never one to rest on his laurels, Dr. Harrison brought his entrepreneurial spirit to the Board of Directors of ASTRO from 2005-2009. As President and Chair, he advocated for a name change for the Society to stress the importance of cancer care to its members. At ASTRO's 50th Annual Meeting in Boston in September 2008, the membership voted to change its name from the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology to its current name, the American Society for Radiation Oncology. After spending most of his career in New York, Dr. Harrison joined the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tampa, Florida, in 2014. He serves Moffitt as the Chair of Radiation Oncology, as well as Deputy Physician-in-Chief. "Coming to Moffitt was a big decision for me. I think Moffitt is a great place to collaborate with outstanding multidisciplinary colleagues and pursue team science," said Dr. Harrison. "That's an integral step to fulfill our dream of developing personalized radiation therapy." Michael L. Steinberg, MD, FASTRO, is driven by his professional commitment to provide excellence in patient care through his expertise in health policy, and he has worked tirelessly in service to the specialty of radiation oncology as an advocate and leader. "I am grateful and humbled to receive this recognition from my peers," Steinberg said. "For me, this award celebrates the incredible advances we have achieved in radiation oncology and cancer treatment, but also underscores the continued need to combine clinical research with effective health policy to best provide our patients with state-of-the-art care." Following his graduation from the University of Southern California School of Medicine, Dr. Steinberg completed a postgraduate year in surgery at LAC+USC Medical Center, before entering the radiation oncology residency and fellowship program at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). "Early in my medical training, I found that I was most comfortable taking care of patients with the most significant and severe health problems," Dr. Steinberg said of his decision to specialize in radiation oncology. "I quickly learned that cancer patients are among the most heroic patients one can see in the practice of medicine." In the early years of his private medical practice, Dr. Steinberg developed an expertise in health care economics and health policy through teaching and working in health services research at UCLA and the Rand Corporation. Dr. Steinberg was tapped to serve as a representative to the Relative Value Update Committee (RUC) for ASTRO from 1997-2002 and as the radiation oncology representative to the CPT Editorial Committee from 2002-2010. As one of his nominating letters put it, "There is a debt owed to Dr. Steinberg by all radiation oncologists for the many tireless years of work he put in to the CPT Panel, due to his deep understanding of complex health care and reimbursement issues." Dr. Steinberg understood and foresaw the increasing demands of managing health care economic issues for the specialty of radiation oncology. "This is not just about billing, this is also about access to radiation oncology care and the quality of that care," Dr. Steinberg would say. In 2002, the Health Policy Council was formed as part of the reorganization of ASTRO governance. Dr. Steinberg was subsequently elected to the ASTRO Board of Directors as the inaugural Chair of the Health Policy Council, from 2003-2007. In 2008, Dr. Steinberg's career took a turn when he left community practice to become Professor and Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology for the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, a post he still holds. "Although it is unusual for someone to go from private practice to a leadership position in one of the great research universities, Dr. Steinberg has all of the qualities needed and it rapidly became clear that he was made for the position," wrote one of his nominators. Under Dr. Steinberg's leadership, the department has become a leader in radiation oncology research and education. "The residency program expanded and all divisions of the department have seen a significant increase in extramural research funding," added another of his nominators. "The department is now clearly a marquee program within a marquee institution." In 2010, Dr. Steinberg was elected to the presidential track of ASTRO. In addition to his advocacy for the specialty of radiation oncology on Capitol Hill and with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Dr. Steinberg introduced the notion of the Value Proposition in health care for radiation oncology. He also led ASTRO Board initiatives such as "Choosing Wisely" and the RO-ILS: Radiation Oncology Incident Learning System®. Dr. Steinberg is considered a national expert in the value in cancer care and he has been invited to speak at the Institute of Medicine and numerous academic cancer centers about the topic. He currently serves on national technology assessment forums, bringing valuable representation for the specialty to the process. Dr. Steinberg has also been appointed to a number of leadership posts, including Director of Clinical Affairs for UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and, after election by his peers, to the Chair of Clinical Chairs for the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He also sits on the executive governing group for UCLA Health. For more information about ASTRO's 59th Annual Meeting, visit http://www. . For press registration and news briefing information for ASTRO's 59th Annual Meeting, visit http://www. . For media inquiries, contact Liz Gardner, Media Relations Manager, Leah Kerkman Fogarty, Communications Manager. ASTRO is the premier radiation oncology society in the world, with more than 11,000 members who are physicians, nurses, biologists, physicists, radiation therapists, dosimetrists and other health care professionals that specialize in treating patients with radiation therapies. As the leading organization in radiation oncology, the Society is dedicated to improving patient care through professional education and training, support for clinical practice and health policy standards, advancement of science and research, and advocacy. ASTRO publishes three medical journals, International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics and Practical Radiation Oncology and Advances in Radiation Oncology; developed and maintains an extensive patient website, http://www. ; and created the Radiation Oncology Institute, a non-profit foundation to support research and education efforts around the world that enhance and confirm the critical role of radiation therapy in improving cancer treatment. To learn more about ASTRO, visit http://www. .


The NIH and NCI cuts would be achieved largely by capping overhead costs associated with federal research funding at 10 percent, in contrast to the average 50 to 60 percent that institutions currently receive to defray the administrative costs of scientific research. Implementing an unrealistic cap on these administrative dollars would result in fewer jobs for researchers, especially for early career scientists, and less support for clinical trials. More dangerously, it could cause entire research programs to shut down. In addition to curtailing support for cancer research, the budget also proposes more than $600 billion in cuts to Medicaid that would limit patient access to health coverage and care. Multiple studies have demonstrated a link between inadequate health insurance and delayed cancer diagnosis and treatment, ultimately resulting in higher mortality rates. New limits on coverage for cancer patients will restrict their access to the treatments they need and deserve. Inadequate coverage also leads to higher costs that are felt throughout the economy. In March, ASTRO joined cancer research advocates in opposing these cuts in the President's draft budget proposal. Now that these proposed cuts have come to fruition in the official budget request, ASTRO strongly encourages Congress to support cancer patients nationwide by rejecting the cuts and pursuing alternatives that preserve the viability of cancer research and care. ABOUT ASTRO ASTRO is the premier radiation oncology society in the world, with more than 10,000 members who are physicians, nurses, biologists, physicists, radiation therapists, dosimetrists and other health care professionals who specialize in treating patients with radiation therapies. As the leading organization in radiation oncology, the Society is dedicated to improving patient care through professional education and training, support for clinical practice and health policy standards, advancement of science and research, and advocacy. ASTRO publishes three medical journals, International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (www.redjournal.org), Practical Radiation Oncology (www.practicalradonc.org) and Advances in Radiation Oncology (www.advancesradonc.org); developed and maintains an extensive patient website, RT Answers (www.rtanswers.org); and created the Radiation Oncology Institute (www.roinstitute.org), a nonprofit foundation to support research and education efforts around the world that enhance and confirm the critical role of radiation therapy in improving cancer treatment. To learn more about ASTRO, visit www.astro.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/presidents-budget-would-dramatically-undermine-progress-in-cancer-research-and-care-300463105.html


News Article | June 12, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ARLINGTON, Va., June 12, 2017 -- The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) issued a new clinical guideline for the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in early-stage lung cancer today. While SBRT is the current standard of care for peripherally located tumors in patients who cannot undergo surgery, the new guideline addresses the appropriateness of SBRT for medically inoperable patients with high-risk clinical scenarios requiring curative focused therapy. The guideline also reviews the role of SBRT for centrally located tumors because of their unique risks compared to peripheral tumors. The guideline is available as a free access article (link will be live after embargo lifts) in Practical Radiation Oncology, ASTRO's clinical practice journal. SBRT is an advanced type of external beam radiation therapy that uses sophisticated planning techniques to deliver an extremely high dose of radiation very precisely to a tumor. This high degree of precision makes SBRT notably effective at sparing healthy tissues surrounding the tumor, which is particularly important with lung tumors. For patients who are not fit enough for early-stage lung cancer surgery, SBRT presents a viable option for curative-intent treatment since it provides excellent outcomes with low toxicity. Compared to conventional external beam radiation therapy, which is delivered over several weeks, SBRT is typically administered in five or fewer treatment sessions, or fractions. Drawing on data from retrospective and prospective studies and the available randomized clinical trials, the guideline provides evidence-based recommendations regarding the appropriate use of SBRT for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The principal goal of the guideline was to address SBRT for patients unable to tolerate surgery who require customization of SBRT in high-risk clinical scenarios, such as for salvage therapy after previous surgery or radiation therapy, for tumors invading the chest wall or for very large tumors. The guideline also details principles of SBRT directed toward centrally located lung tumors, since treating these tumors carries unique and significant risks when compared to treatment directed at peripherally located tumors. Additionally, although the focus of the guideline was the inoperable patient, the appropriateness of SBRT in the operable patient also was addressed, since it is an area of debate and controversy. The guideline first addresses the appropriateness of SBRT as an alternative to surgery for different subsets of medically operable patients with early-stage NSCLC (e.g., T1-2, N0). Recommendations differ for patients at "high" versus "standard" risk for surgery-related mortality and are as follows: For medically inoperable patients, recommendations vary based on tumor location, size and type, as well as treatment history. Guidelines are as follows: For the medically inoperable patient, the guideline also outlines how SBRT techniques should be tailored for high-risk scenarios where the tumor abuts critical structures, so that appropriate tumor control can be achieved while minimizing risk to these same structures. Guidelines are as follows: Finally, the guideline considers the role of SBRT as salvage therapy for medically inoperable patients with recurrent early-stage disease. Recommendations vary based on treatment history and are as follows: "With longer life expectancies and more sophisticated diagnostic tools, we have seen a rise in the incidence of early-stage lung cancer, including among patients who are not able to undergo surgery or choose not to do so. SBRT provides an option for these patients, who otherwise may not have received curative, definitive treatment," said Gregory M. M. Videtic, MD, co-chair of the task force that authored the guideline and a radiation oncologist at the Cleveland Clinic. "Increasing access to this potentially life-saving treatment is essential to improve outcomes for the growing population of early-stage NSCLC patients." "NSCLC is a complex disease, with a great deal of heterogeneity among patients. This guideline reinforces SBRT as the standard of care for medically inoperable patients, but it also examines the safety and efficacy of SBRT in less traditional clinical scenarios, such as patients with larger tumors or recurrent patients with early-stage disease," said Megan E. Daly, MD, also co-chair of the task force and a radiation oncologist at the University of California, Davis in Sacramento, California. The guideline was based on a systematic literature review of studies published from January 1995 through August 2016. A total of 402 abstracts were retrieved from PubMed, and the 172 articles that met inclusion criteria were evaluated by an 18-member task force of experts in lung cancer, including radiation oncologists, surgeons and a patient representative. The Clinical Practice Statement was approved by ASTRO's Board of Directors following a period of public comment. The guideline has been endorsed by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR). For a copy of "Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline" or to schedule an interview with one of the authors, contact ASTRO's media relations team at press@astro.org or 703-286-1600. ASTRO is the premier radiation oncology society in the world, with more than 10,000 members who are physicians, nurses, biologists, physicists, radiation therapists, dosimetrists and other health care professionals who specialize in treating patients with radiation therapies. As the leading organization in radiation oncology, the Society is dedicated to improving patient care through professional education and training, support for clinical practice and health policy standards, advancement of science and research, and advocacy. ASTRO publishes three medical journals, International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics (http://www. ), Practical Radiation Oncology (http://www. ) and Advances in Radiation Oncology (http://www. ); developed and maintains an extensive patient website, RT Answers (http://www. ); and created the Radiation Oncology Institute (http://www. ), a nonprofit foundation to support research and education efforts around the world that enhance and confirm the critical role of radiation therapy in improving cancer treatment. To learn more about ASTRO, visit http://www. .


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

This report studies Game Headset in Global Market, especially in North America, China, Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2012 to 2016, and forecast to 2022. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering Sennheiser SteelSeries Turtle Beach Cooler Master Creative Technology Mad Catz Hyperx (Kingston) Corsair Gioteck Logitech Razer Roccat Sades Sentey Skullcandy Kotion Electronic SADES Somic ASTRO Gaming Audio-Technica SOMIC By types, the market can be split into Wired Headsets Wireless Headsets By Application, the market can be split into Console PC By Regions, this report covers (we can add the regions/countries as you want) North America China Europe Southeast Asia Japan India Global Game Headset Market Professional Survey Report 2017 1 Industry Overview of Game Headset 1.1 Definition and Specifications of Game Headset 1.1.1 Definition of Game Headset 1.1.2 Specifications of Game Headset 1.2 Classification of Game Headset 1.2.1 Wired Headsets 1.2.2 Wireless Headsets 1.3 Applications of Game Headset 1.3.1 Console 1.3.2 PC 1.3.3 Application 3 1.4 Market Segment by Regions 1.4.1 North America 1.4.2 China 1.4.3 Europe 1.4.4 Southeast Asia 1.4.5 Japan 1.4.6 India 2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Game Headset 2.1 Raw Material and Suppliers 2.2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Game Headset 2.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Game Headset 2.4 Industry Chain Structure of Game Headset 8 Major Manufacturers Analysis of Game Headset 8.1 Sennheiser 8.1.1 Company Profile 8.1.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.1.2.1 Product A 8.1.2.2 Product B 8.1.3 Sennheiser 2016 Game Headset Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.1.4 Sennheiser 2016 Game Headset Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.2 SteelSeries 8.2.1 Company Profile 8.2.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.2.2.1 Product A 8.2.2.2 Product B 8.2.3 SteelSeries 2016 Game Headset Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.2.4 SteelSeries 2016 Game Headset Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.3 Turtle Beach 8.3.1 Company Profile 8.3.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.3.2.1 Product A 8.3.2.2 Product B 8.3.3 Turtle Beach 2016 Game Headset Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.3.4 Turtle Beach 2016 Game Headset Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.4 Cooler Master 8.4.1 Company Profile 8.4.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.4.2.1 Product A 8.4.2.2 Product B 8.4.3 Cooler Master 2016 Game Headset Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.4.4 Cooler Master 2016 Game Headset Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.5 Creative Technology 8.5.1 Company Profile 8.5.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.5.2.1 Product A 8.5.2.2 Product B 8.5.3 Creative Technology 2016 Game Headset Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.5.4 Creative Technology 2016 Game Headset Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.6 Mad Catz 8.6.1 Company Profile 8.6.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.6.2.1 Product A 8.6.2.2 Product B 8.6.3 Mad Catz 2016 Game Headset Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.6.4 Mad Catz 2016 Game Headset Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.7 Hyperx (Kingston) 8.7.1 Company Profile 8.7.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.7.2.1 Product A 8.7.2.2 Product B 8.7.3 Hyperx (Kingston) 2016 Game Headset Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.7.4 Hyperx (Kingston) 2016 Game Headset Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.8 Corsair 8.8.1 Company Profile 8.8.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.8.2.1 Product A 8.8.2.2 Product B 8.8.3 Corsair 2016 Game Headset Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.8.4 Corsair 2016 Game Headset Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.9 Gioteck 8.9.1 Company Profile 8.9.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.9.2.1 Product A 8.9.2.2 Product B 8.9.3 Gioteck 2016 Game Headset Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.9.4 Gioteck 2016 Game Headset Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.10 Logitech 8.10.1 Company Profile 8.10.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.10.2.1 Product A 8.10.2.2 Product B 8.10.3 Logitech 2016 Game Headset Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.10.4 Logitech 2016 Game Headset Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.11 Razer 8.12 Roccat 8.13 Sades 8.14 Sentey 8.15 Skullcandy 8.16 Kotion Electronic 8.17 SADES 8.18 Somic 8.19 ASTRO Gaming 8.20 Audio-Technica 8.21 SOMIC For more information, please visit http://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— The Global Telescope Market Research Report 2017is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Telescope industry. In a word, This report studies Telescope in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with capacity, production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer. Key companies included in this research are Celestron, Meade, Vixen Optics, Takahashi, ASTRO-PHYSICS, Bushnell, Bresser, ORION, Barska, Sky Watcher, Bosma, SharpStar, Visionking and TianLang. Market Segment by Region, this report splits Global into several key Region, with sales, revenue, market share and growth rate of Telescope in these regions, from 2011 to 2022 (forecast), like North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India. Firstly, Telescope Market Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Refracting telescope, Reflector Telescope and Catadioptric telescope. Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Telescope in each application, can be divided into Enter-level, Intermediate Level, Advanced and Astronomical. 7 Global Telescope Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 Celestron 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Telescope Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Refracting telescope 7.1.2.2 Reflector Telescope 7.1.3 Celestron Telescope Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 Meade 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Telescope Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Refracting telescope 7.2.2.2 Reflector Telescope 7.2.3 Meade Telescope Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 Vixen Optics 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Telescope Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Refracting telescope 7.3.2.2 Reflector Telescope 7.3.3 Vixen Optics Telescope Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview Figure Picture of Telescope Figure Global Production Market Share of Telescope by Type in 2015 Figure Product Picture of Refracting telescope Table Major Manufacturers of Refracting telescope Figure Product Picture of Reflector Telescope Table Major Manufacturers of Reflector Telescope Figure Product Picture of Catadioptric telescope Table Major Manufacturers of Catadioptric telescope Table Telescope Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015 Figure Enter-level Examples Figure Intermediate Level Examples Figure Advanced Astronomical Examples Figure North America Telescope Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure Europe Telescope Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure China Telescope Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure Japan Telescope Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure Southeast Asia Telescope Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure India Telescope Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure Global Telescope Revenue (Million UDS) and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Table Global Telescope Capacity of Key Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) Table Global Telescope Capacity Market Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) Figure Global Telescope Capacity of Key Manufacturers in 2015 Figure Global Telescope Capacity of Key Manufacturers in 2016 Table Global Telescope Production of Key Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) Table Global Telescope Production Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) Figure 2015 Telescope Production Share by Manufacturers Figure 2016 Telescope Production Share by Manufacturers Table Global Telescope Revenue (Million USD) by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) Table Global Telescope Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) Table 2015 Global Telescope Revenue Share by Manufacturers Table 2016 Global Telescope Revenue Share by Manufacturers Table Global Market Telescope Average Price of Key Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) Figure Global Market Telescope Average Price of Key Manufacturers in 2015 Table Manufacturers Telescope Manufacturing Base Distribution and Sales Area For more information, please visit http://www.reportsweb.com/global-telescope-market-research-report-2017


Following a prostate cancer diagnosis, men are often faced with an array of treatment options, based on their prostate cancer severity or its potential to spread elsewhere within the body. Based on the tumor, treatment-related factors such as oncologic outcomes and side effects, as well as other patient-related considerations, these options can be overwhelming, which is why the guideline panel strongly suggests physicians and patients engage in shared decision making to select the best care option for each individual patient. "Selecting optimal care for each prostate cancer patient is a complex process that requires physicians to help patients choose options consistent with the patient's own values and in accordance with the best available scientific evidence," said Martin G. Sanda, MD, chair of the guideline development panel and chair of the department of urology at the Emory School of Medicine. "The new clinical guideline offers a framework to facilitate such shared decision-making, while also specifying which cancers are better managed by active surveillance, as well as providing guidance as to which treatments are appropriate for cancers warranting intervention.  It also provides specifics for implementing care options, managing side effects and administering post-treatment follow-up." The Localized Prostate Cancer Clinical Guideline makes 68 statements in total, including the recommendation that active surveillance is preferred for the care of low-risk localized prostate cancer, while radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy plus androgen deprivation therapy are recommended as the treatment standard for patients with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer. The guideline was developed by a panel of AUA, ASTRO and SUO-selected experts, all of whom have specific expertise with regard to prostate cancer. It was then distributed to peer reviewers of varying backgrounds as part of the AUA's extensive peer review process before being finally approved by the AUA, ASTRO and SUO Board of Directors. Shared decision making, care options based on cancer severity, as well as, specific care options including active surveillance, radical prostatectomy, high intensity focused ultrasound and focal therapy management are among the statements covered in this guideline.  The full text of the evidence-based Localized Prostate Cancer Guideline is now available online. NOTE TO REPORTERS: Experts are available to discuss this study. To arrange an interview with an expert, please contact the AUA Communications Office at 410-689-3932 or e-mail cfrey@AUAnet.org. About the American Urological Association: Founded in 1902 and headquartered near Baltimore, Maryland, the American Urological Association is a leading advocate for the specialty of urology, and has more than 21,000 members throughout the world. The AUA is a premier urologic association, providing invaluable support to the urologic community as it pursues its mission of fostering the highest standards of urologic care through education, research and the formulation of health policy. To learn more about the AUA, visit www.AUAnet.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/aua-astro-and-suo-release-new-clinical-guideline-on-standard-of-care-for-men-with-localized-prostate-cancer-300453577.html

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