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Kpadonou B.A.R.,Comite Inter Etats de Lutte contre la Secheresse au Sahel CILSS | Barbier B.,Institute International Of Lingenierie Of Leau Et Of Lenvironnement 2Ie | Barbier B.,CIRAD - Agricultural Research for Development | Wellens J.,Association pour la Promotion de lEducation et de la Formation a lEtranger APEFE | And 2 more authors.
Water International | Year: 2015

A spatial hydroeconomic model was developed to analyze the competition between small private (SPIS) and large public (LPIS) irrigation systems for water control in tropical watersheds and applied to several water allocation policies in Kou watershed in Burkina Faso. Capital (cash and motorpumps) is the main constraining factor for SPIS expansion, and capital inflow accelerates SPIS development and reduces water flows for downstream LPIS users. As SPIS is more cost-effective and less water thirsty, LPIS needs to shift to less water-demanding and high-value crops or adopt more water-saving practices. Otherwise, only a sharp rice yield increase in LPIS can justify a reserved water quota for downstream users. © 2015 International Water Resources Association. Source


Wellens J.,Association pour la Promotion de lEducation et de la Formation a lEtranger APEFE | Wellens J.,University of Liege | Nitcheu M.,Observatoire de lEau | Traore F.,University of Liege | Tychon B.,University of Liege
Agricultural Water Management | Year: 2013

Within the framework of a national policy on food sufficiency dating back to the late 1960s, a 1200. ha State-run irrigated rice scheme, called the 'Kou Valley' scheme, was established in south-western Burkina Faso. Jointly managed over a long period by State officials and a series of international development agencies, all aid ended abruptly in 1993, leaving the farmers and their hastily assembled Water Users Association (WUA) poorly prepared to assume management of the scheme. Concerned about the poor state of the water management and aware of their lack of management skills, the WUA turned to a private external operator for support via a public-private partnership (PPP), which involved outsourcing the water management. Initially, the PPP was funded and assisted by an international development agency. The costs are now gradually being met by the WUA and will ultimately represent 12% of the water fees collected from WUA members. An irrigation advisor was appointed on a full-time basis, and technical studies were conducted to assess the water management problems and put forward viable solutions using decision-support tools (SIMIS).At various stages, participatory meetings were organised to enable the farmers to express their opinions and to propose and discuss possible solutions. After 3. years, there was some improvement in the land occupation situation and the water distribution was more equitable in some parts, as shown by various performance indicators and a general survey. However there are limits to what water management change alone can achieve without essential infrastructural improvements. As the WUA members lacked the necessary education, effective knowledge transfer was not possible and therefore assistance on water management is likely to remain in private or State hands. The farmers, however, have indicated their satisfaction with the proposed approach and their willingness to participate in PPP-based management of the scheme. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Source


Kpadonou B.A.R.,Comite Inter Etats de Lutte contre la Secheresse au Sahel CILSS | Barbier B.,Institute International Of Lingenierie Of Leau Et Of Lenvironnement 2Ie | Barbier B.,CIRAD - Agricultural Research for Development | Wellens J.,Association pour la Promotion de lEducation et de la Formation a lEtranger APEFE | And 2 more authors.
Water International | Year: 2015

A spatial hydroeconomic model was developed to analyze the competition between small private (SPIS) and large public (LPIS) irrigation systems for water control in tropical watersheds and applied to several water allocation policies in Kou watershed in Burkina Faso. Capital (cash and motorpumps) is the main constraining factor for SPIS expansion, and capital inflow accelerates SPIS development and reduces water flows for downstream LPIS users. As SPIS is more cost-effective and less water thirsty, LPIS needs to shift to less water-demanding and high-value crops or adopt more water-saving practices. Otherwise, only a sharp rice yield increase in LPIS can justify a reserved water quota for downstream users. © 2015 International Water Resources Association Source


Wellens J.,Association pour la Promotion de lEducation et de la Formation a lEtranger APEFE | Wellens J.,University of Liege | Midekor A.,Observatoire de lEau | Traore F.,University of Liege | Tychon B.,University of Liege
International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation | Year: 2013

In recent decades, the Kou watershed in south-western Burkina Faso has suffered from poor water management. Despite the abundance of water, most water users regularly face water shortages because of the increase in the amount of land under irrigation. To help them achieve a more equitable allocation of irrigated land, local stakeholders need an easily managed low-cost tool for monitoring and mapping these irrigated zones. The aim of this study was to develop a fast and low-cost procedure for mosaicing and geo referencing amateur small-scale aerial photographs for land-use surveys. Sets of tens (2009) and hundreds (2007) of low-altitude aerial photographs, with a resolution of 0.4 m and 0.8 m, respectively, were used to create a detailed land-cover map of typical African small-scale irrigated agriculture. A commercially available stitching tool and GIS allowed geo referenced 'mono-images' to be constructed; both mosaics were warped on a high-resolution SPOT image with a horizontal root mean square error (RMSE) of about 11 m. The RMSE between the two image datasets was 2 m. This approach is less sensitive to atmospheric conditions that are non-predictable in programming satellite imagery. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Source

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