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Camillo J.,Assembly
Assembly | Year: 2014

An epiphany is often defined as the moment when someone more clearly understands a problem or situation, or sees it from a different perspective. In the context of assembly, the term might refer to when an inventor or engineer has the idea for a new or better product or process. By early 2013, Graco formed a new-product engineering team to transform its original feeder design into a commercially viable product. Over several months, the feeder's table and its surface geometry were redesigned and optimized. Advanced vibration dampening features were added, and operator controls were incorporated in the unit base. In October 2013, the G-Flex 1500 feeder was brought to market. It was showcased at the inaugural ASSEMBLY Show later that month. The purpose of any flexible feeder is to present parts to a vision-guided robot. One or more cameras take images of the parts, and vision software indicates which parts the robot needs to retrieve and move. Source


Camillo J.,Assembly
Assembly | Year: 2014

Optimizing product quality is an ongoing challenge for all employees of Robert Bosch GmbH, the world's largest supplier of automotive components. To achieve its goal, the company often turns to PA-AMTO, an in-house provider of assembly systems and specialized equipment. PA-ATMO's responsibilities include testing leak-detection procedures and developing leak-testing systems for several company divisions. One division is gasoline services, which manufactures specialized gas injection and engine control systems in Bamberg, Germany. PA-ATMO developed a test system for the bifuel valves that has four parallel stations. Each station features a TGuard leak sensor and a vacuum chamber with a volume of 1 liter. The new system takes up less floor space and offers higher productivity than the conventional detector. It tests up to four valves simultaneously, whereas the old system only tested one. Source


Sprovieri J.,Assembly
Assembly | Year: 2014

Viking Plastics of Corry, PA, is a global supplier of engineered, injection-molded and assembled sealing components to many industries. Its products include plastic connectors, closures, clips, brackets, caps and fasteners. The eight-station system, which was built by Automated Industrial Systems Inc. in Erie, PA, employs a camdriven rotary indexing table with double-nest fixtures at each station. A stainless steel vibratory feeder bowl with a bulk hopper supplies two feed lines for the caps. At the first processing station, a pick-and-place device transfers two caps to a fixture on the dial. A signal alerts the operator to remove the full container and replace it with an empty one. Station 8 is used as a reject station for bad product. All parts and debris removed here are delivered to a remote location to prevent the possibility of getting mixed with good parts. The entire system is mounted on a fabricated steel frame. It is controlled by an Allen-Bradley MicroLogix 1500 PLC with a PanelView Plus 600 operator interface touch screen control panel. Source


Camillo J.,Assembly
Assembly | Year: 2014

Great advances have been made in computational fluid dynamics and flight-simulation programs. The tunnels enable aerospace manufacturers to conduct a wide range of tests, including stability and control, jet effects and captive trajectory. More importantly, the tunnels eliminate the need for full-size prototypes, which take years to develop and build, and cost millions of dollars. Three video cameras are used for standing air-flow testing. Another is required for the schlieren test, which captures the flow away from an object's surface. A fifth video camera, along with a still-image-camera, is required for oil-flow visualization. For several years, Calspan engineers used five standard-definition video cameras and a Hasselblad still filmbased camera under fluorescent lighting. Engineers streamed video through a frame rate and signal converter, and used a matrix switcher for display and recording. Wind-tunnel data was overlaid and recorded by a PC with a video capture card. Source


Engineers at Ford Motor Co. are welcoming this challenge in a software pilot program being implemented at the company's Wayne, MI, assembly plant. The software is called IntoSite. Developed by Siemens PLM, it uses Google Earth infrastructure that enables Ford to virtually navigate any of its 65 assembly plants worldwide. Equally important, the software increases global collaboration so workers can share best practices, resolve inconsistencies and improve efficiency and standardization. IntoSite is a cloud-based Web application that provides a virtual 3D image of the plant's interior. Engineers and other team members use the software to better understand and optimize what assemblers do at specific workstations and the design of complete assembly lines. At any virtual location in the plant, the person can add pins and upload videos, documents and images to these pins. Documents pertaining to specific issues are stored and accessed in a common place rather than multiple internal systems. Source

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