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Joining ASRC in the petition are the State of Alaska, the North Slope Borough, the Northwest Arctic Borough, the Inupiat Community of the Arctic Slope and NANA Regional Corporation. "This is yet another example of federal overreach threatening the quality of life and economic viability of Alaska Native communities," said Rex A. Rock Sr., ASRC president and CEO. "The Ninth Circuit's decision will have detrimental effects on growth and sustainability in our region, at a time when the state's economy is already on unstable ground." Rock continued, "By accepting uncertain 100-year climate projections as the basis for a threatened listing, the appellate court has undermined the statutory requirement that threats to a species be foreseeable. The Ninth Circuit's permissive standard for the listing of species not only creates unnecessary regulatory burdens on the North Slope, but sets the stage for additional species to be considered for ESA listing throughout the entire state." "If the ESA listing for bearded seals were to stand, it would require us to recover a population that has not yet declined," said Bruce Dale, Director of the Division of Wildlife Conservation and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. "That is simply not possible and a poor use of resources." "We are deeply concerned by this decision, just as we were five years ago," said North Slope Borough Mayor Harry K. Brower, Jr. "We want to work together with industry and government agencies to protect the subsistence rights of our people, protect the environment, and develop all the resources of the North Slope in a responsible manner. We support this court petition, but we are always ready to meet and discuss a way forward." In 2013, Alaska Native entities, the State of Alaska, and the oil and gas industry filed lawsuits challenging the NMFS listing decision. The Alaska District Court vacated the bearded seal listing in the summer of 2014, concluding that "forecasting more than 50 years into the future is simply too speculative and remote." NMFS appealed the ruling. Arctic Slope Regional Corporation is owned by and represents the business interests of the Arctic Slope Iñupiat. Since opening enrollment in 1990 to Alaska Natives born after 1971, the corporation's shareholder base has nearly tripled, growing from the 3,700 original enrollees to around 13,000 today. Corporate headquarters are based in Barrow, Alaska, with administrative and subsidiary offices located in Anchorage and throughout the United States. ASRC, along with its family of companies, is the largest Alaskan-owned company, employing approximately 11,000 people worldwide. The company has six major business segments: petroleum refining and marketing, energy support services, construction, industrial services, government services and resource development.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CONCORD, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--ASRC Industrial Services (AIS), a premier provider of industrial and environmental services throughout the Continental United States, is pleased to announce the acquisition of Finite Holdings, LLC and Finite’s respective operating subsidiaries DACA Specialty Services, LLC (DACA) and D2 Industrial Services, LLC (D2). DACA was founded more than 32 years ago, and since that time has established a reputation as a value-added solutions provider by executing challenging projects in accordance with customer schedules and budgets. Based in Atlanta, DACA provides tailored solutions to commercial and industrial customers across multiple end markets primarily in the Southeastern United States. DACA’s suite of services include: complex painting and coating applications, cleaning and abrasive blasting, interior and exterior tank lining, asset maintenance management programs, lead abatement and concrete containment. Founded in 2007, Knoxville, Tenn.-based D2 provides painting and coating services primarily in the Midwestern United States to government agencies, along with industrial and commercial clients. “The additions of DACA and D2 immediately augment AIS’s service offerings and increase our geographic footprint in the Southeastern and Midwest regions of the United States,” said Greg Johnson, president and CEO of AIS. “The combination of DACA and D2’s respective skill sets and exceptional reputations made them ideal acquisition targets for AIS as we pursue our growth strategy with the intention of building an enduring customer-focused, employee-centric enterprise.” “Today is an exciting day for the employees and customers of DACA and D2, respectively,” said David Joiner, Finite’s president. “On behalf of all Finite, DACA and D2 employees, we are excited to join the AIS family and look forward to leveraging the full breadth of AIS services to deliver value-added solutions to both our legacy customer base as well as prospective customers.” Headquartered in Concord, Calif., ASRC Industrial Services (AIS) is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Arctic Slope Regional Corporation. AIS is organized within three capability based operating groups: construction, maintenance and repair; remediation and response services; and environmental engineering and professional services. AIS has more than 1,500 employees and operates throughout the Continental United States. AIS goes to market under the names Petrochem and Restoration Services, Inc. AIS and its subsidiaries are considered minority business enterprises. Learn more about ASRC Industrial Services at www.asrcindustrial.com.


COPENHAGEN, 16-Feb-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — Ramboll Environ and the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation (ASRC) recently signed an agreement to engage in close collaboration in the Arctic region. Both organizations share a commitment to sustainable development in the Arctic and around the world. The ASRC is an Alaska Native-owned and operated corporation and has diverse business interests including energy, petroleum refining, industrial services, construction and resource development. “We are delighted to have found a collaboration partner whose core values and commitment to sustainability resonate so closely with our own. We look forward to working together with Ramboll Environ,” says Rex A. Rock Sr., ASRC president and CEO. Frank Marrazza, President of Ramboll Environ’s Americas Division, says that the agreement with ASRC “is an exciting enhancement to Ramboll’s longstanding experience in the Arctic and reflects the firm’s commitment to delivering environmentally and socially responsible outcomes that create enduring benefits for our clients and Arctic communities.” About ASRC Arctic Slope Regional Corporation is owned by and represents the business interests of the Arctic Slope Iñupiat. Since opening enrollment in 1989 to Alaska Natives born after 1971, the corporation’s shareholder base has nearly tripled, growing from the 3,700 original enrollees to around 13,000 today. Corporate headquarters are based in Barrow, Alaska, with administrative and subsidiary offices located in Anchorage and throughout the United States. ASRC, along with its family of companies, is the largest Alaskan-owned company, employing approximately 12,000 people across Alaska and the Lower 48. The company has six major business segments: petroleum refining and marketing, energy support services, industrial services, construction, government services and resource development. Read more on ASRC’s website here.


ANCHORAGE, Alaska, Nov. 4, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Arctic Slope Regional Corporation (ASRC) today filed a petition for writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court in response to a Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling earlier this year. The ruling designated approximately 187,000 square...


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Application is another important milestone for the AEC BARROW, Alaska, Dec. 5, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Arctic Slope Regional Corporation has applied to the Arctic Economic Council (AEC) to be a Northern Partner, the first such organization in the region to do so. The AEC's full member representation includes a diverse collection of business industries that operate in and outside of the Arctic. "On behalf of Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, I am proud to submit the first application for membership as a Northern Partner," said Rex A. Rock Sr., president and CEO of ASRC. "The AEC has proven itself to be a leader in promoting sustainable business in the Arctic, and I look forward to our continued relationship." The AEC was established by the Arctic Council during the 2013-2015 Canadian chairmanship as an independent organization aimed at facilitating Arctic business-to-business activities and responsible economic development. The AEC's vision is to make the Arctic a favorable place to do business. There are various levels of membership at the Arctic Economic Council. Larger businesses with their headquarters located within an Arctic state may apply to join the AEC family as a Northern Partner. The application will be reviewed by the AEC executive committee before being presented to the governance committee for final approval. About ASRC Arctic Slope Regional Corporation is owned by and represents the business interests of the Arctic Slope Iñupiat. Since opening enrollment in 1989 to Alaska Natives born after 1971, the corporation's shareholder base has nearly tripled, growing from the 3,700 original enrollees to around 13,000 today. Corporate headquarters are based in Barrow, Alaska, with administrative and subsidiary offices located in Anchorage and throughout the United States. ASRC, along with its family of companies, is the largest Alaskan-owned company, employing approximately 12,000 people worldwide.  The company has six major business segments: petroleum refining and marketing, energy support services, industrial services, construction, government services and resource development. About the AEC   The AEC is a business forum established to facilitate Arctic business-to-business activities, promote responsible economic development and provide a circumpolar business perspective to the work of the Arctic Council. The inaugural meeting was held in September 2014 in Iqaluit, Nunavut Canada. It has a 42-member board from eight Arctic states and six permanent participant organizations. Finland will assume the chairmanship from the U.S. in 2017.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Cette candidature représente un autre jalon important pour le CEA BARROW, Alaska, 6 décembre 2016 /PRNewswire/-- Première organisation à le faire dans la région, l'Arctic Slope Regional Corporation (ASRC) a demandé au Conseil économique de l'Arctique (CEA) à devenir un partenaire du nord. Les représentations en tant que membres à part entière du CEA regroupent divers secteurs industriels qui opèrent dans l'Arctique et en dehors de celui-ci. « Au nom de l'Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, je suis fier de présenter la première demande d'adhésion en tant que partenaire du nord », a déclaré Rex A. Rock Sr., président-directeur général de l'ASRC. « Le CEA a fait ses preuves comme leader dans la promotion des entreprises durables dans l'Arctique, et j'espère fermement en la poursuite de notre relation. » Le CEA a été créé par le Conseil de l'Arctique pendant la présidence canadienne de 2013-2015 en tant qu'organisation indépendante destinée à faciliter des activités commerciales interentreprises et un développement économique responsable. La vision du CEA est de faire de l'Arctique un lieu favorable où l'on puisse faire des affaires. Il existe différents niveaux d'adhésions au Conseil économique de l'Arctique. Les grandes entreprises dont le siège est situé dans un État de l'Arctique peuvent demander à rejoindre la famille du CEA en tant que partenaires du nord. La demande sera examinée par le comité exécutif du CEA avant d'être présentée au comité de gouvernance pour approbation finale. À propos de l'ASRC L'Arctic Slope Regional Corporation est détenue par l'Arctic Slope Iñupiat dont elle représente les intérêts. Depuis l'ouverture des inscriptions en 1989 aux originaires de l'Alaska nés après 1971, la base d'actionnaires a presque triplé, passant de 3700 participants initiaux à environ 13 000 aujourd'hui. Le siège social est basé à Barrow en Alaska, avec des bureaux d'administration et de filiales situés à Anchorage et à travers les États-Unis. L'ASRC avec sa famille d'entreprises est la plus grande société d'appartenance alaskaine, employant environ 12 000 personnes dans le monde. La société s'occupe de six grands secteurs d'affaires : raffinage et marketing du pétrole, services de soutien à l'énergie, services industriels, construction, services publics et ressources de développement. À propos du CEA Le CEA est un forum d'affaires créé pour faciliter dans l'Arctique les activités interentreprises, promouvoir un développement économique responsable et offrir une perspective d'affaires circumpolaires aux travaux du Conseil de l'Arctique. La séance inaugurale a eu lieu en septembre 2014 à Iqaluit dans le Nunavut au Canada. Son conseil d'administration rassemble 42 membres de huit États de l'Arctique et de six organisations dont la participation est permanente. La Finlande prendra la relève des États-Unis pour la présidence en 2017.


News Article | March 11, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Abstract: A team of international scientists led by researchers of the CUNY Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) and the Politecnico of Milan in Italy has demonstrated a novel approach for designing fully reconfigurable magnetic nanopatterns whose properties and functionality can be programmed and reprogrammed on-demand. The method -- published in Nature Nanotechnology and led by Elisa Riedo, Professor of Physics with the ASRC's Nanoscience Initiative, and Riccardo Bertacco, a professor with the Politenico of Milan--is based on thermal scanning probe lithography and uses a hot nano-tip to perform a highly localized field heating and cooling in antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic thin films. The hot tip is then used to align the spins in the material in any desired direction with nanoscale resolution. "The proposed technique is straightforward and combines the full reversibility and stability of exchange bias, as the same pattern can be written and reset many times, with the resolution and versatility of scanning probe lithography," said Riedo. "In particular, this work demonstrates how thermal scanning probe lithography is gaining momentum as a key nanofabrication method for the next generation of nanodevices, from biomedical sensing to sprintronics." This approach offers researchers the opportunity to control magnetism at the nanoscale as never before. The authors used this method to fabricate channels where spin waves can propagate. Spin waves are a propagating re-ordering of the magnetization in a material. A new generation of computing and sensing devices can be fabricated based on the propagation of spin waves instead of the more conventional electric current. Bertacco noted these findings will allow for the development of novel metamaterials with finely-tuned magnetic properties, as well as a reconfigurable computing device architectures. "Equally promising is the creation of structures with high response to external magnetic fields, as they can be used as sensors in new architectures of spintronic devices," he said. "The potential target market for these devices is extremely large--especially with the advent of the age of the 'Internet of things'--in which every object has a growing need for integrated sensors and computational capacity." Edoardo Albisetti, postdoctoral research associate at the Politecnico of Milan and the paper's first author, said the new magnetic nanostructure patterning method gives researchers an increased amount of control. "So far, the patterning of magnetic nanostructures has been mainly achieved through irreversible structural or chemical modifications," Albisetti said. "On the contrary, by using this new thermal assisted magnetic scanning probe lithography (tam-SPL) method, the magnetic nanopatterns are fully reconfigurable and obtained without modifying the film chemistry and topography." The ability to draw new meta-magnetic materials opens the way for the development of innovative devices for information processing based on logic cells as well as on the propagation and manipulation of spin waves in magnonic structures. ### The work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, the US National Science Foundation, and the Fondazione Cariplo. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | October 4, 2016
Site: phys.org

Research led by Rein Ulijn, Director of the CUNY Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC)'s Nanoscience Initiative and Professor of Chemistry at Hunter College, has paved the way for the development of dynamically-evolving polymers that form spontaneously by adapting to their environment, which may lead to a number of product possibilities including drug delivery, food science and cosmetics, the results of which were published today in Nature Nanotechnology.


News Article | October 11, 2016
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Research led by Rein Ulijn, director of the CUNY Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC)'s Nanoscience Initiative and professor of chemistry at Hunter College, could pave the way for the development of dynamically-evolving polymers that form spontaneously by adapting to their environment. This research, which is reported in a paper in Nature Nanotechnology, could lead to a number of product possibilities in applications such as drug delivery, food science and cosmetics. Ulijn and his team discovered that if peptides – strings of polymers composed of amino acids – are allowed to continuously reorganize their sequences, they will eventually form polymers that are best suited to their environment, at the expense of less favored structures. Using this method, which is inspired by the principles of evolution, Ulijn's team was able to identify a range of heretofore unseen peptide-based materials. While previous research in peptide nanotechnology has centered on chance discoveries or painstaking design, this new approach allows for the unbiased discovery by self-selection of optimized structures. "In our quest to find materials based on biology's building blocks – but which are much simpler – it is difficult to rationally design these materials because there are very many possible permutations that could be explored," Ulijn said. "Instead of designing rationally to improve materials, we've found a way to autonomously evolve," said Charalampos Pappas, first author and a former CUNY ASRC postdoctoral researcher. "We achieve this by having components dynamically connect, rearrange and disconnect, resulting in the spontaneous selection and formation of the most stable self-assembling nanostructures." This paper is a continuation of Ulijn's research into tunable peptide structures, which have shown great promise in a variety of commercial applications. These include: biodegradable nanospheres for use in drug delivery applications; nanofibers that can form gel-phase materials, which could find use in a variety of applications, including cosmetics; and biodegradable plastics that can withstand harsh conditions. This evolution-based peptide discovery method does not yet cover the full range of chemical functionalities present in natural materials and is currently a time-consuming process. "These issues can potentially be overcome by automation and miniaturization of the process, which is the focus of current research," Ulijn said. This story is adapted from material from CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.


News Article | March 9, 2016
Site: phys.org

The method—published in Nature Nanotechnology and led by Elisa Riedo, Professor of Physics with the ASRC's Nanoscience Initiative, and Riccardo Bertacco, a professor with the Politenico of Milan—is based on thermal scanning probe lithography and uses a hot nano-tip to perform a highly localized field heating and cooling in antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic thin films. The hot tip is then used to align the spins in the material in any desired direction with nanoscale resolution. "The proposed technique is straightforward and combines the full reversibility and stability of exchange bias, as the same pattern can be written and reset many times, with the resolution and versatility of scanning probe lithography," said Riedo. "In particular, this work demonstrates how thermal scanning probe lithography is gaining momentum as a key nanofabrication method for the next generation of nanodevices, from biomedical sensing to sprintronics." This approach offers researchers the opportunity to control magnetism at the nanoscale as never before. The authors used this method to fabricate channels where spin waves can propagate. Spin waves are a propagating re-ordering of the magnetization in a material. A new generation of computing and sensing devices can be fabricated based on the propagation of spin waves instead of the more conventional electric current. Bertacco noted these findings will allow for the development of novel metamaterials with finely-tuned magnetic properties, as well as a reconfigurable computing device architectures. "Equally promising is the creation of structures with high response to external magnetic fields, as they can be used as sensors in new architectures of spintronic devices," he said. "The potential target market for these devices is extremely large—especially with the advent of the age of the 'Internet of things'—in which every object has a growing need for integrated sensors and computational capacity." Edoardo Albisetti, postdoctoral research associate at the Politecnico of Milan and the paper's first author, said the new magnetic nanostructure patterning method gives researchers an increased amount of control. "So far, the patterning of magnetic nanostructures has been mainly achieved through irreversible structural or chemical modifications," Albisetti said. "On the contrary, by using this new thermal assisted magnetic scanning probe lithography (tam-SPL) method, the magnetic nanopatterns are fully reconfigurable and obtained without modifying the film chemistry and topography." The ability to draw new meta-magnetic materials opens the way for the development of innovative devices for information processing based on logic cells as well as on the propagation and manipulation of spin waves in magnonic structures. Explore further: Researchers take magnetic waves for a spin More information: E. Albisetti et al. Nanopatterning reconfigurable magnetic landscapes via thermally assisted scanning probe lithography, Nature Nanotechnology (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2016.25

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