Asper Clinical Research Institute

Winnipeg, Canada

Asper Clinical Research Institute

Winnipeg, Canada

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Tahhan J.,Asper Clinical Research Institute | Pierre J.S.,Child and Parent Resource Institute | Stewart S.L.,Child and Parent Resource Institute | Leschied A.W.,University of Western Ontario | Cook S.,University of Toronto
Residential Treatment for Children and Youth | Year: 2010

Findings are reported regarding maternal experiences of their seriously emotionally disordered child both prior to and following a stay in a residential children's mental health treatment facility. Prior to placement, these parents had exhausted all nonresidential forms of intervention and, increasingly, became concerned not only for their identified child's welfare, but also for that of themselves and other siblings in the home. Regardless of whether their child's stay in residential treatment yielded positive or negative treatment outcomes, these parents unilaterally viewed the intensive short-term treatment of their child as an extremely valuable and necessary service. Parental recommendations for improvement in residential services include a reduced waitlist period, availability of services to children at a younger age, more parental education regarding effective child management strategies, and increased support for caregivers. The results are discussed as they relate to policy and practice for residential treatment providers. © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Hack T.F.,University of Manitoba | Hack T.F.,Asper Clinical Research Institute | Ruether J.D.,Tom Baker Cancer Center | Ruether J.D.,University of Calgary | And 5 more authors.
Psycho-Oncology | Year: 2013

Objective The objectives of this implementation study were to (i) address the evidentiary, contextual, and facilitative mechanisms that serve to retard or promote the transfer and uptake of consultation recording use in oncology practice and (ii) follow patients during the first few days following receipt of the consultation recording to document, from the patient's perspective, the benefits realized from listening to the recording. Methods Nine medical and nine radiation oncologists from cancer centers in three Canadian cities (Calgary, Vancouver, and Winnipeg) recorded their primary consultations for 228 patients newly diagnosed with breast (n = 174) or prostate cancer (n = 54). The Digital Recording Use Semi-Structured Interview was conducted at 2 days and 1 week postconsultation. Each oncologist was provided a feedback letter summarizing the consultation recording benefits reported by their patients. Results Sixty-nine percent of patients listened to at least a portion of the recording within the first week following the consultation. Consultation recording favorableness ratings were high: 93.6% rated the intervention between 75 and 100 on a 100-point scale. Four main areas of benefit were reported: (i) anxiety reduction; (ii) enhanced retention of information; (iii) better informed decision making; and (iv) improved communication with family members. Eight fundamental components of successful implementation of consultation recording practice were identified. Conclusions Further randomized trials are recommended, using standardized measures of the patient-reported benefit outcomes reported herein, to strengthen the evidence base for consultation recording use in oncology practice. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Hack T.F.,University of Manitoba | Hack T.F.,Asper Clinical Research Institute | Carlson L.,University of Calgary | Butler L.,University of Saskatchewan | And 5 more authors.
Supportive Care in Cancer | Year: 2011

Purpose: Over the past two decades, the fields of psychosocial oncology and supportive care have seen clinically effective tools as underutilized despite proven benefits to cancer patients and their families. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the reasons for the failure of psychosocial and supportive care interventions in oncology to realize broad clinical implementation and to demonstrate how a knowledge management framework offers several advantages for increasing the probability of successful implementation. Methods: This paper is based on a systematic review of the literature pertaining to efforts to implement psychosocial oncology and supportive care interventions. Results: The struggle to develop, implement, and evaluate promising psychosocial oncology and supportive care innovations has moved academic thought toward the development of models and theories concerning the best ways to move new knowledge into clinical practice. There are critical and common barriers to the successful transfer and implementation of promising interventions, and implementation efforts may be maximized by using knowledge management frameworks to systematically identify and address these barriers. Conclusions: The successful implementation of empirically promising interventions requires research networks and practice groups to work together in a concerted, theory-guided effort to identify and address the contextual factors most relevant to any particular intervention. The growing support of knowledge implementation activities by research funders, policy-makers, opinion leaders, and advocates of psychosocial and supportive care interventions is a positive move in this direction. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Sawatzky J.A.V.,University of Manitoba | Sawatzky J.A.V.,St Boniface Hospital | Rivet M.,St Boniface Hospital | Ariano R.E.,St Boniface Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care | Year: 2014

Objectives: Post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common and distressing complication following cardiac surgery. Therefore, our primary objective was to explore the predictors of severe PONV in the cardiac surgery population. Methods: A retrospective study was completed on cardiac surgery patients (. N=150). A modified preoperative PONV risk assessment tool was utilized to identify patients at high and low risk for PONV. Results: 54% of the high-risk group versus 13% of the low-risk group experienced <2 nausea events in the early post-operative period (. p<0.0001). The high-risk group had a uniquely elevated and sustained number of PONV events post-operatively. History of PONV (. p=0.03) and female gender (. p=0.01) emerged as significant predictors of any nausea event. Conclusions: A specific PONV risk assessment tool may be useful for predicting those at highest risk following cardiac surgery. Further research is required to identify strategies to reduce PONV. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Adameova A.,University of Manitoba | Elimban V.,University of Manitoba | Rodriguez-Leyva D.,Vi Lenin University Hospital | Tappia P.S.,Asper Clinical Research Institute | Dhalla N.S.,University of Manitoba
Serbian Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research | Year: 2014

Background: Diabetes is associated with myocardial electrical instability and prolongation of action potential duration that result in disturbances in the rhythm of the heart. Objective: Th is study was undertaken to examine the role of circulating catecholamines in abnormal cardiac rhythm and contractility during diff erent stages of diabetes. Methods: Diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats with streptozotocin (STZ; 65 mg/kg, i.v.). Epinephrine (4-128 μg/kg, i.v.) -induced arrhythmias and plasma levels of epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) were determined in control, 4- and 8-wk diabetic animals. Echocardiography was used to assess cardiac remodeling and contractile function. Results: Although diabetes induced cardiac dysfunction, there were no significant diff erences in cardiac output, ejection fraction, left ventricle (LV) dimensions, LV fractional shortening between the 4- and 8-wk diabetic animals. Th e electrocardiogram of both diabetic groups showed deep S wave as well as changes in T wave and ST segment. In addition, prolongation of the RR interval in the 4- and 8-wk diabetic animals was seen, while prolongation of the QT and PR intervals were only seen in the 8-wk diabetic animals. Th e severity of Epi-induced ventricular arrhythmias, as assessed by arrhythmia score, was significantly lower in the 8-wk diabetic rats, as compared to the 4-wk diabetic animals. Circulating Epi levels were significantly decreased in the 8-wk diabetic rats, whereas NE levels were increased in the 4-wk diabetic rats. Conclusions: Th e sensitivity of the diabetic heart to catecholamine- triggered arrhythmias may be dependent on circulating Epi rather than NE and thus it can be proposed that the increased incidence of sudden cardiac death in diabetics may not be associated with response to catecholamines.


Hack T.F.,University of Manitoba | Hack T.F.,Asper Clinical Research Institute | Crooks D.,University of Manitoba | Plohman J.,University of Manitoba | Kepron E.,University of Manitoba
Supportive Care in Cancer | Year: 2014

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a historical review of psycho-oncology and supportive care research in Canada using citation analysis and to review the clinical impact of the research conducted by the most highly cited researchers. Methods: The lifetime journal publication records of 109 psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers in Canada were subject to citation analysis using the Scopus database, based on citations since 1996 of articles deemed relevant to psychosocial oncology and supportive care, excluding selfcitations. Three primary types of analysis were performed for each individual: the number of citations for each journal publication, a summative citation count of all published articles, and the Scopus h-index. Results: The top 20 psycho-oncology/supportive care researchers for each of five citation categories are presented: the number of citations for all publications; the number of citations for first-authored publications; the most highly cited first-authored publications; the Scopus h-index for all publications; and the Scopus h-index for first-authored publications. The three most highly cited Canadian psychooncology researchers are Dr. Kerry Courneya (University of Alberta), Dr. Lesley Degner, (University of Manitoba), and Dr. Harvey Chochinov (University of Manitoba). Conclusions: Citation analysis is useful for examining the research performance of psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers and identifying leaders among them. © Springer-Verlag 2013.


PubMed | St Boniface Hospital, University of Manitoba and Asper Clinical Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Heart & lung : the journal of critical care | Year: 2014

Post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common and distressing complication following cardiac surgery. Therefore, our primary objective was to explore the predictors of severe PONV in the cardiac surgery population.A retrospective study was completed on cardiac surgery patients (N=150). A modified preoperative PONV risk assessment tool was utilized to identify patients at high and low risk for PONV.54% of the high-risk group versus 13% of the low-risk group experienced 2 nausea events in the early post-operative period (p<0.0001). The high-risk group had a uniquely elevated and sustained number of PONV events post-operatively. History of PONV (p=0.03) and female gender (p=0.01) emerged as significant predictors of any nausea event.A specific PONV risk assessment tool may be useful for predicting those at highest risk following cardiac surgery. Further research is required to identify strategies to reduce PONV.

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