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WASHINGTON, May 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today Dr. David Veal, executive director of the American Shrimp Processors Association (ASPA), testified before officials from the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) and the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) at a public hearing in Washington, DC to address significant trade deficits in the shrimp industry. “For decades, our shrimp industry has faced surging imports of farm-raised shrimp produced overseas,” Dr. Veal said. “As a result, the U.S. trade deficit in shrimp is substantial and growing." Dr. Veal’s testimony will be considered in the drafting of an “Omnibus Report on Significant Trade Deficits,” which will be presented to President Trump by the DOC and USTR.  ASPA also submitted written comments. The U.S. trade deficit in shrimp totaled $4.49 billion in 2016.  India, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Mexico, China, and Malaysia are seven of thirteen countries with which the United States ran a significant overall shrimp trade deficit in 2016.  These nations are also nations being investigated in the Omnibus Report.  The deficit of $3.44 billion with these nations is 77 percent of the total shrimp trade deficit.  And, the deficit in shrimp from those seven countries has increased 44 percent since 2012. “The U.S. trade deficit in all seafood was a staggering $10.5 billion in 2016, greater than the deficit in either raw iron and steel or aluminum,” Dr. Veal said in his testimony.  The deficit, he added, is the result of unfair and illegal trade practices, including persistent dumping in the U.S. market and subsidization by foreign governments. On May 2, the International Trade Commission unanimously voted to extend the current antidumping orders on shrimp from China, India, Thailand and Vietnam for an additional five years.  Those orders provide important discipline in the market, Dr. Veal testified, but have limited coverage and still allow large volumes of unfairly traded shrimp to enter the United States. “Unfairly traded imports have distorted trade patterns and hindered the growth and future stability of the domestic industry,” Dr. Veal said. ASPA is currently pursuing a policy agenda to help restore domestic job growth and promote balanced trade, and is optimistic those concerns will be addressed in the Omnibus Report presented to the President. The American Shrimp Processors Association, based in Biloxi, Mississippi, was formed in 1964 to represent and promote the interests of the domestic, U.S. wild-caught, warm water shrimp processing industry along the Gulf Coast with members from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. A collective voice of the industry, the ASPA's focus is to promote the interests of shrimp processors, other segments of the U.S. domestic wild-caught shrimp industry and the general public.


WASHINGTON, May 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today Dr. David Veal, executive director of the American Shrimp Processors Association (ASPA), testified before officials from the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) and the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) at a public hearing in Washington, DC to address significant trade deficits in the shrimp industry. “For decades, our shrimp industry has faced surging imports of farm-raised shrimp produced overseas,” Dr. Veal said. “As a result, the U.S. trade deficit in shrimp is substantial and growing." Dr. Veal’s testimony will be considered in the drafting of an “Omnibus Report on Significant Trade Deficits,” which will be presented to President Trump by the DOC and USTR.  ASPA also submitted written comments. The U.S. trade deficit in shrimp totaled $4.49 billion in 2016.  India, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Mexico, China, and Malaysia are seven of thirteen countries with which the United States ran a significant overall shrimp trade deficit in 2016.  These nations are also nations being investigated in the Omnibus Report.  The deficit of $3.44 billion with these nations is 77 percent of the total shrimp trade deficit.  And, the deficit in shrimp from those seven countries has increased 44 percent since 2012. “The U.S. trade deficit in all seafood was a staggering $10.5 billion in 2016, greater than the deficit in either raw iron and steel or aluminum,” Dr. Veal said in his testimony.  The deficit, he added, is the result of unfair and illegal trade practices, including persistent dumping in the U.S. market and subsidization by foreign governments. On May 2, the International Trade Commission unanimously voted to extend the current antidumping orders on shrimp from China, India, Thailand and Vietnam for an additional five years.  Those orders provide important discipline in the market, Dr. Veal testified, but have limited coverage and still allow large volumes of unfairly traded shrimp to enter the United States. “Unfairly traded imports have distorted trade patterns and hindered the growth and future stability of the domestic industry,” Dr. Veal said. ASPA is currently pursuing a policy agenda to help restore domestic job growth and promote balanced trade, and is optimistic those concerns will be addressed in the Omnibus Report presented to the President. The American Shrimp Processors Association, based in Biloxi, Mississippi, was formed in 1964 to represent and promote the interests of the domestic, U.S. wild-caught, warm water shrimp processing industry along the Gulf Coast with members from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. A collective voice of the industry, the ASPA's focus is to promote the interests of shrimp processors, other segments of the U.S. domestic wild-caught shrimp industry and the general public.


WASHINGTON, May 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today Dr. David Veal, executive director of the American Shrimp Processors Association (ASPA), testified before officials from the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) and the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) at a public hearing in Washington, DC to address significant trade deficits in the shrimp industry. “For decades, our shrimp industry has faced surging imports of farm-raised shrimp produced overseas,” Dr. Veal said. “As a result, the U.S. trade deficit in shrimp is substantial and growing." Dr. Veal’s testimony will be considered in the drafting of an “Omnibus Report on Significant Trade Deficits,” which will be presented to President Trump by the DOC and USTR.  ASPA also submitted written comments. The U.S. trade deficit in shrimp totaled $4.49 billion in 2016.  India, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Mexico, China, and Malaysia are seven of thirteen countries with which the United States ran a significant overall shrimp trade deficit in 2016.  These nations are also nations being investigated in the Omnibus Report.  The deficit of $3.44 billion with these nations is 77 percent of the total shrimp trade deficit.  And, the deficit in shrimp from those seven countries has increased 44 percent since 2012. “The U.S. trade deficit in all seafood was a staggering $10.5 billion in 2016, greater than the deficit in either raw iron and steel or aluminum,” Dr. Veal said in his testimony.  The deficit, he added, is the result of unfair and illegal trade practices, including persistent dumping in the U.S. market and subsidization by foreign governments. On May 2, the International Trade Commission unanimously voted to extend the current antidumping orders on shrimp from China, India, Thailand and Vietnam for an additional five years.  Those orders provide important discipline in the market, Dr. Veal testified, but have limited coverage and still allow large volumes of unfairly traded shrimp to enter the United States. “Unfairly traded imports have distorted trade patterns and hindered the growth and future stability of the domestic industry,” Dr. Veal said. ASPA is currently pursuing a policy agenda to help restore domestic job growth and promote balanced trade, and is optimistic those concerns will be addressed in the Omnibus Report presented to the President. The American Shrimp Processors Association, based in Biloxi, Mississippi, was formed in 1964 to represent and promote the interests of the domestic, U.S. wild-caught, warm water shrimp processing industry along the Gulf Coast with members from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. A collective voice of the industry, the ASPA's focus is to promote the interests of shrimp processors, other segments of the U.S. domestic wild-caught shrimp industry and the general public.


WASHINGTON, May 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today Dr. David Veal, executive director of the American Shrimp Processors Association (ASPA), testified before officials from the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) and the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) at a public hearing in Washington, DC to address significant trade deficits in the shrimp industry. “For decades, our shrimp industry has faced surging imports of farm-raised shrimp produced overseas,” Dr. Veal said. “As a result, the U.S. trade deficit in shrimp is substantial and growing." Dr. Veal’s testimony will be considered in the drafting of an “Omnibus Report on Significant Trade Deficits,” which will be presented to President Trump by the DOC and USTR.  ASPA also submitted written comments. The U.S. trade deficit in shrimp totaled $4.49 billion in 2016.  India, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Mexico, China, and Malaysia are seven of thirteen countries with which the United States ran a significant overall shrimp trade deficit in 2016.  These nations are also nations being investigated in the Omnibus Report.  The deficit of $3.44 billion with these nations is 77 percent of the total shrimp trade deficit.  And, the deficit in shrimp from those seven countries has increased 44 percent since 2012. “The U.S. trade deficit in all seafood was a staggering $10.5 billion in 2016, greater than the deficit in either raw iron and steel or aluminum,” Dr. Veal said in his testimony.  The deficit, he added, is the result of unfair and illegal trade practices, including persistent dumping in the U.S. market and subsidization by foreign governments. On May 2, the International Trade Commission unanimously voted to extend the current antidumping orders on shrimp from China, India, Thailand and Vietnam for an additional five years.  Those orders provide important discipline in the market, Dr. Veal testified, but have limited coverage and still allow large volumes of unfairly traded shrimp to enter the United States. “Unfairly traded imports have distorted trade patterns and hindered the growth and future stability of the domestic industry,” Dr. Veal said. ASPA is currently pursuing a policy agenda to help restore domestic job growth and promote balanced trade, and is optimistic those concerns will be addressed in the Omnibus Report presented to the President. The American Shrimp Processors Association, based in Biloxi, Mississippi, was formed in 1964 to represent and promote the interests of the domestic, U.S. wild-caught, warm water shrimp processing industry along the Gulf Coast with members from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. A collective voice of the industry, the ASPA's focus is to promote the interests of shrimp processors, other segments of the U.S. domestic wild-caught shrimp industry and the general public.


WASHINGTON, May 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today Dr. David Veal, executive director of the American Shrimp Processors Association (ASPA), testified before officials from the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) and the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) at a public hearing in Washington, DC to address significant trade deficits in the shrimp industry. “For decades, our shrimp industry has faced surging imports of farm-raised shrimp produced overseas,” Dr. Veal said. “As a result, the U.S. trade deficit in shrimp is substantial and growing." Dr. Veal’s testimony will be considered in the drafting of an “Omnibus Report on Significant Trade Deficits,” which will be presented to President Trump by the DOC and USTR.  ASPA also submitted written comments. The U.S. trade deficit in shrimp totaled $4.49 billion in 2016.  India, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Mexico, China, and Malaysia are seven of thirteen countries with which the United States ran a significant overall shrimp trade deficit in 2016.  These nations are also nations being investigated in the Omnibus Report.  The deficit of $3.44 billion with these nations is 77 percent of the total shrimp trade deficit.  And, the deficit in shrimp from those seven countries has increased 44 percent since 2012. “The U.S. trade deficit in all seafood was a staggering $10.5 billion in 2016, greater than the deficit in either raw iron and steel or aluminum,” Dr. Veal said in his testimony.  The deficit, he added, is the result of unfair and illegal trade practices, including persistent dumping in the U.S. market and subsidization by foreign governments. On May 2, the International Trade Commission unanimously voted to extend the current antidumping orders on shrimp from China, India, Thailand and Vietnam for an additional five years.  Those orders provide important discipline in the market, Dr. Veal testified, but have limited coverage and still allow large volumes of unfairly traded shrimp to enter the United States. “Unfairly traded imports have distorted trade patterns and hindered the growth and future stability of the domestic industry,” Dr. Veal said. ASPA is currently pursuing a policy agenda to help restore domestic job growth and promote balanced trade, and is optimistic those concerns will be addressed in the Omnibus Report presented to the President. The American Shrimp Processors Association, based in Biloxi, Mississippi, was formed in 1964 to represent and promote the interests of the domestic, U.S. wild-caught, warm water shrimp processing industry along the Gulf Coast with members from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. A collective voice of the industry, the ASPA's focus is to promote the interests of shrimp processors, other segments of the U.S. domestic wild-caught shrimp industry and the general public.


WASHINGTON, March 31, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- “We are very pleased that President Donald Trump has taken major action today to strengthen U.S. trade enforcement,” said American Shrimp Processor Association Executive Director Dr. David Veal.  “Making it harder for foreign companies to evade legally required duties helps to level the playing field for U.S. companies like ASPA members against unfair foreign competitors,” he added. “For imported shrimp and many other imported products covered by orders, there have been problems with importers disappearing or not paying duties found owed.  Under this order, Customs and Border Protection will have 90 days to devise a plan to protect the revenue where importers pose risks by requiring additional bonding or other security,” said ASPA Gulf Trade Counsel, Eddy Hayes.  “Ensuring that high risk importers cannot import dumped or subsidized imports and then escape liability for duties owed is an important step towards improving the effectiveness of U.S. trade remedies,” he commented. “In an industry like shrimp, where small, family-owned American businesses have to compete with large volumes of unfairly traded imports, foreign duty evasion is a perennial and widespread problem,” commented Dr. Veal.  “When this order is implemented, duty collection should immediately improve.  That means the competitiveness of our U.S. shrimp industry improves and our ASPA members can create more jobs.” The American Shrimp Processors Association (ASPA), based in Biloxi, Mississippi, was formed in 1964 to represent and promote the interests of the domestic, U.S. wild-caught, warm water shrimp processing industry along the Gulf Coast with members from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. We are the collective voice of the industry, and our focus is to promote the interests of shrimp processors, other segments of the U.S. domestic wild-caught shrimp industry and the general public.


WASHINGTON, May 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) voted unanimously to support the domestic shrimp industry’s request to extend the antidumping orders on shrimp from China, India, Thailand and Vietnam for an additional five years.  The USITC voted to remove the orders on Brazil.    “We at the American Shrimp Processors Association (ASPA) are grateful that the U.S. International Trade Commission affirmed evidence of the risk that dumped shrimp imports from these five nations poses to the domestic shrimp industry,” said Dr. David Veal, Executive Director of ASPA.  “We in the domestic shrimp industry look forward to five additional years of relief from unfair foreign trade practices,” Dr. Veal added. “We are pleased that the USITC validated the data and evidence we presented, which we believe clearly showed the harm that these imports would cause to the domestic industry if the orders were revoked,”  noted ASPA Gulf Counsel Edward T. Hayes.  “We are grateful for the strong support of U.S. Senators, Representatives, and other public offices from North Carolina to Texas for their shrimp processors, harvesters and docks across the region,” said Hayes. “ASPA members really appreciate that seventeen senior public officials supported our efforts at the USTIC.  They clearly understood that a successful outcome in this case was vital to the survival of the businesses in the American shrimp industry and to the future viability of the communities in which they live,” said Dr. Veal.  “We are especially grateful for the strong support of those who testified in person at the USITC, Representatives Walter Jones (R-NC), Steven Palazzo (R-MS), Garret Graves (R-LA) and Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser (R-LA),” he added. “ASPA also wants to thank Senators Thad Cochran (R-MS), Richard Shelby (R-AL), Roger Wicker (R-MS), and Bill Cassidy (R-LA)  for all their strong support now and over the years on this and a myriad of other issues,” Hayes noted. The American Shrimp Processors Association (ASPA), based in Biloxi, Mississippi, was formed in 1964 to represent and promote the interests of the domestic, U.S. wild-caught, warm water shrimp processing industry along the Gulf Coast with members from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. We are the collective voice of the industry, and our focus is to promote the interests of shrimp processors, other segments of the U.S. domestic wild-caught shrimp industry and the general public.


WASHINGTON, March 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) held a public hearing to help decide whether to renew anti-dumping trade enforcement orders against Brazil, China, India, Thailand and Vietnam in place for five more years or whether to sunset those orders. The USITC will hold a final vote on May 2, which will decide their fate.     Public official allies of the domestic shrimp industry today stressed that these orders are critical to restore free and fair trade in shrimp. American Shrimp Processor Association (ASPA) leaders appreciate the strong support of these public officials from the Gulf and South Atlantic regions that are critical to this effort to keep the domestic shrimp industry viable for the long term. “We are so pleased that 14 public officials from across the Gulf and South Atlantic Coast have weighed in so far at the USITC in support of domestic shrimp harvesters, processors and distributors,” said Dr. David Veal, Executive Director of ASPA. “We are grateful that the representatives, senators, and statewide officials support the retention of anti-dumping orders on foreign shrimp.” “In particular, we want to thank Representatives Garret Graves (R-LA), Walter Jones (R-NC) and Steven Palazzo (R-MS), as well as Louisiana Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser (R-LA), who all testified in person today at the USITC,” said Eddy Hayes, Gulf Counsel to ASPA. “Their commitment to trade enforcement and leveling the playing field for the domestic shrimp industry is impressive,” he added. “We are optimistic that the result of this Sunset Review will be the retention of these important anti-dumping orders,” Dr. Veal noted. “Leaders from our Gulf and South Atlantic regions understand the economic and cultural impact of the shrimp industry and are committed to its survival,” Hayes added. So far Senators Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Thad Cochran (R-MS), John Kennedy (R-LA), Richard Shelby (R-AL), Luther Strange (R-AL), and Roger Wicker (R-MS) have all committed to submit either letters or testimony in support of the domestic shrimp industry. On the House side, Representatives Clay Higgins (R-LA), Cedric Richmond (R-LA), Steve Scalise (R-LA), and Randy Weber (R-TX) have all committed to support the domestic shrimp industry. Additional input from other public officials from the region is also welcome. “ASPA is so appreciative of all the support that our government officials have provided. They are an impressive group of leaders for their constituents,” Dr. Veal noted. The American Shrimp Processors Association (ASPA), based in Biloxi, Mississippi, was formed in 1964 to represent and promote the interests of the domestic, U.S. wild-caught, warm water shrimp processing industry along the Gulf Coast with members from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. We are the collective voice of the industry, and our focus is to promote the interests of shrimp processors, other segments of the U.S. domestic wild-caught shrimp industry and the general public.


WASHINGTON, April 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- On April 18th President Donald Trump issued an Executive Order to strengthen the Buy America component of the U.S. government’s procurement process.   ASPA Executive Director Dr. David Veal made the following statement in support of the order: “President Trump’s Executive Order released today to strengthen our government’s Buy America program will create new jobs in the Gulf shrimp communities of Alabama, Louisiana,   Mississippi, and across the country.   We commend President Trump’s commitment to making sure the federal government purchases American products whenever possible.   We deserve a comprehensive review of the programs in place at each of our agencies to ensure that domestic industries obtain the maximum positive economic from Buy American programs. While some federal agencies such as the Department of Commerce and the Department of Transportation have great procurement guidelines in place, it is unclear whether all federal agencies pursue Buy America with the same vigor.  Any loopholes in the law that benefit foreign producers need to be closed.  Any provisions which impede U.S. producers need to be changed. We appreciate this effort and the Trump Administration’s ongoing efforts to restore the competitive position of the country.   This is the strongest effort by any administration to ensure that US laws designed to promote the purchase of domestically-produced products are effectively enforced.” About ASPA: The American Shrimp Processors Association (ASPA), based in Biloxi, Mississippi, was formed in 1964 to represent and promote the interests of the domestic, U.S. wild-caught, warm water shrimp processing industry along the Gulf Coast with members from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. We are the collective voice of the industry, and our focus is to promote the interests of shrimp processors, other segments of the U.S. domestic wild-caught shrimp industry and the general public.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

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