Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum

Asian and, United States

Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum

Asian and, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Cook W.K.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | Weir R.C.,Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations | Ko K.L.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | Panapasa S.,University of Michigan | And 4 more authors.
Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action | Year: 2012

Background: Functionally, many CBPR projects operate through a model of academic partners providing research expertise and community partners playing a supporting role. Objectives: To demonstrate how national umbrella organizations deeply rooted in communities, cognizant of community needs, and drawing on the insights and assets of community partners, can lead efforts to address health disparities affecting their constituents through research. Methods: Case studies of two Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander national organizations Results: Strategically engaging a diverse range of partners and securing flexible funding mechanisms that support research were important facilitators. Main challenges included limited interest of local community organizations whose primary missions as service or health care providers may deprioritize research. Conclusions: Efforts to make research relevant to the work of community partners and to instill the value of research in community partners, as well as flexible funding mechanisms, may help to promote community-driven research. © 2012 The Johns Hopkins University Press.


Zhu S.-H.,University of California at San Diego | Wong S.,University of California at San Diego | Nakashima D.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | Gamst A.,University of California at San Diego
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2010

Objectives. We examined state quitline utilization by smokers who called Chinese-, Vietnamese-, or Korean-language lines, and compared their usage rates to those of Asians and Whites calling the English-language line. Methods. Using data from 15 years (1993-2008) of operation of the California quitline (which included data on 22061 callers to Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese lines) and from multiple California Health Interview Surveys, we computed the call rates for Whites, English-speaking Asians, and the 3 Asianlanguage groups. We also examined callers' demographics and where they heard about the quitline. Results. Asian smokers who spoke English were significantly less likely than English-speaking White smokers to call the quitline (odds ratios range from 0.36 to 0.62). Smokers speaking 1 of the 3 Asian languages were no less likely than White smokers to call (odds ratios range from 0.82 to 3.25). More than 80% of those calling the Asian-language lines reported hearing about the quitline through mass media. Conclusions. Contrary to general expectation, smokers speaking Asian languages were just as likely to call the quitline as English-speaking White smokers. State quitlines should consider adding Asian-language lines to help address disparities in access to cessation services.


Russ L.W.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Takahashi L.M.,University of California at Los Angeles | Ho W.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | Tseng W.,University of California at Berkeley | Ponce N.A.,University of California at Los Angeles
Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action | Year: 2012

Problem: This paper argues that it is necessary to strengthen Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AA and NHPI) community-based participatory research (CBPR) models that integrate a health policy agenda through dynamic legislative partnerships. Purpose: We utilize a case study approach and examine three health research partnership models that impact legislative design and action: The California Program on Access to Care (CPAC), the California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP), and the University of California Asian American and Pacific Islander Policy Multicampus Research Program (UC AAPI Policy MRP). Key Points: In-depth examination reveals the difficulties of engaging in research that collaborates with multiple parties simultaneously and the specific benefits and challenges in each case. Conclusions: New directions are needed to deepen legislative engagement potential in CBPR and the translation of policy research that considers the health of all AA and NHPI communities. © 2012 The Johns Hopkins University Press.


Kwon S.C.,Center for the Study of Asian American Health | Rideout C.,Center for the Study of Asian American Health | Patel S.,Center for the Study of Asian American Health | Arista P.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved | Year: 2015

Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs) experiencea large burden from certain chronic disease- related risk factors. The STRIVE Program funded four AANHPI community- based organizations (CBOs) to implement culturally adapted community gardens and farmers’ markets to increase access to healthy foods. KeyCBO informant interviews were conducted to understand processes and lessons learned. © Meharry Medical College.


Patel S.,New York University | Kwon S.,New York University | Arista P.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | Tepporn E.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2015

Recent initiatives have focused on the dissemination of evidence-based policy, systems, and environmental (EBPSE) strategies to reduce health disparities. Targeted, communitylevel efforts are needed to supplement these approaches for comparable results among Asian Americans and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPIs).The STRIVE Project funded 15 Asian American and NHPI community-based organizations (CBOs) to implement culturally adapted strategies. Partners reached more than 1.4million people at a cost of $2.04 per person. CBOs are well positioned to implement EBPSE strategies to reduce health disparities.


Cook W.K.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | Tseng W.,University of California at Berkeley | Bautista R.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | John I.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum
Preventive Medicine Reports | Year: 2016

Asian American children and adolescents are an under-investigated subpopulation in obesity research. This study aimed to identify specific profiles of Asian subgroups at high risk of adolescent overweight with special attention to Asian ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), and their interaction. Multiple logistic regression models were fitted using a sample of 1533 Asian American adolescents ages 12-17 from the 2007-2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). In addition to Asian ethnicity and socioeconomic status (assessed by family income and parental education level), age, gender, nativity, and two lifestyle variables, fast food consumption and physical activity, were also controlled for in these models. Key predictors of overweight in Asian American adolescents included certain Asian ethnicities (Southeast Asian, Filipino, and mixed ethnicities), low family income (<. 300% of the Federal Poverty Level), and being male. Multiplicative interaction terms between low family income and two ethnicities, Southeast Asian and Vietnamese that had the lowest SES among Asian ethnic groups, were significantly associated with greatly elevated odds of being overweight (ORs = 12.90 and 6.67, respectively). These findings suggest that high risk of overweight in Asian American adolescents associated with low family incomes may be further elevated for those in low-income ethnic groups. Future research might investigate ethnic-group SES as a meaningful indicator of community-level socioeconomic disparities that influence the health of Asian Americans. © 2016 The Authors.


Cook W.K.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | Tseng W.,University of California at Berkeley | Chin K.K.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | John I.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | Chung C.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved | Year: 2014

Working in small businesses has been identified as a key factor for low coverage rates in immigrant communities. In this study, we identify specific cultural and socioeconomic predictors of Asian Americans who work in small businesses to identify subgroups at a greater disadvantage than others in obtaining health insurance. Logistic regression models were fitted using a sample of 3,819 Asian American small business owners and employers extracted from pooled 2005-2012 California Health Interview Survey data. We found that individuals with low income levels, Korean Americans, U.S.-born South Asian and Southeast Asian (other than Vietnamese) Americans, immigrants without citizenship (particularly those lacking a green card), and individuals with limited English proficiency had higher odds of lacking coverage. The odds of being uninsured did not differ between small business owners and employees. Based upon these key findings, we propose several strategies to expand coverage for Asian Americans working in small businesses and their most vulnerable subgroups. © Meharry Medical College.


Kwon S.,New York University | Rideout C.,New York University | Tseng W.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | Islam N.,New York University | And 3 more authors.
Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action | Year: 2012

Health promotion practice research conducted by or in partnership with community-based organizations (CBOs) serving Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AA and NHPI) can address health disparities. Few CBOs have the tools to integrate or initiate research into their programmatic agenda. The New York University (NYU) Center for the Study of Asian American Health (CSAAH) and the Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF) created a partnership with the goal to support CBO research infrastructure development by creating the Community Empowered Research Training (CERT) program. Methods: A survey was conducted and discussions held with CBO leaders representing AA and NHPI communities to inform the development of the CERT program. Results: The majority of participants are engaged in service-related research and reported interest in building their research capacity. CBOs may require help reframing how data can be collected and used to better inform programmatic activities and to address health disparities facing AA and NHPI communities. Conclusions: CBOs possess both an interest in and access to local knowledge that can inform health priorities. Findings have been applied to the CERT program to build capacity to support community-initiated/driven research to address health disparities affecting AAs and NHPIs. © 2012 The Johns Hopkins University Press.


Trinh-Shevrin C.,New York University | Ro M.,Public Health Seattle King County | Tseng W.,Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum | Islam N.S.,New York University | And 2 more authors.
Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action | Year: 2012

Problem: Considerable progress in Asian American health research has occurred over the last two decades. However, greater and sustained federal support is needed for reducing health disparities in Asian American communities. Purpose of the Article: This paper reviews federal policies that support infrastructure to conduct minority health research and highlights one model for strengthening research capacity and infrastructure in Asian American communities. Key Points: Research center infrastructures can play a significant role in addressing pipeline/workforce challenges, fostering campus-community research collaborations, engaging communities in health, disseminating evidence-based strategies and health information, and policy development. Conclusion: Research centers provide the capacity needed for academic institutions and communities to work together synergistically in achieving the goal to reduce health disparities in the Asian American community. Policies that support the development of concentrated and targeted research for Asian Americans must continue so that these centers will reach their full potential. © 2012 The Johns Hopkins University Press.

Loading Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum collaborators
Loading Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum collaborators