Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Asahi, Japan

Aoyama F.,Asahi Soft Drinks Co. | Aoyama F.,Kyushu University | Miyamoto T.,Kyushu University
Food Science and Technology Research | Year: 2015

Thermoanaerobic spore-forming bacteria such as Thermoanaerobacter, Moorella, Thermoanaerobacterium, and Caldanaerobius produce spores with extremely high heat resistance. They are known to spoil various sealed, sterile drinks; in particular, low-acid drinks distributed at high temperatures, such as canned coffee containing milk. These bacteria are difficult to culture and identify on the basis of traditional biochemical characteristics. We developed novel primers for single and multiplex PCR methods for simple identification of these bacteria at the genus level. Bacteria were correctly identified approximately 2 h after DNA extraction among 86 strains of 35 species of Gram-positive and -negative bacteria including various spore-forming bacilli. Furthermore, new Loop- Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) primers were designed to develop a specific detection method for Thermoanaerobacter mathranii and Thermoanaerobacter thermocopriae, highly problematic microbes in the food industry due to their extremely high resistance to heat and various antibacterial agents. Our LAMP method using the novel primers was able to easily detect these microbes. Our present methods effectively improve upon the complicated procedures employed in the quality control of raw materials and products in the food industry. Copyright © 2015, Japanese Society for Food Science and Technology.


Akazome Y.,Asahi Breweries Ltd. | Kametani N.,Asahi Soft Drinks Co. | Kanda T.,Asahi Breweries Ltd. | Shimasaki H.,University of Human Arts and Sciences | Kobayashi S.,University of Human Arts and Sciences
Journal of Oleo Science | Year: 2010

In the present study, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed to evaluate the safety of an excessive intake and the efficacy of a long-term intake of polyphenols derived from apples for moderately underweight to moderately obese subjects (long-term intake: 94 subjects; excessive intake: 30 subjects). For each trial, the subjects were divided into the following two groups: a group that drank beverages with apple polyphenols (600 mg) (hereinafter referred to as the apple group) and a group that drank beverages without apple polyphenols (hereinafter referred to as the placebo group). For the long-term intake trial, the subjects were given a regular amount of the beverage (340 g) each day for 12 weeks. For the excessive intake trial, the subjects were given three times the regular amount of the beverage each day for 4 weeks. It is noteworthy that the visceral fat area (VFA) of subjects in the apple group for the long-term intake trial had decreased significantly by the 8- and 12-week marks (week 8: p < 0.05; week 12: p < 0.01) compared to the baseline (week 0). The degree of change in VFA experienced by subjects in the ap-ple group compared to those in the placebo group was significantly lower by the 8- and 12-week marks (p < 0.01). Stratified analysis indicated that the VFA of subjects in the apple group that started with a high VFA (VFA > or = 100 cm2) had decreased significantly by the 8- and 12-week marks compared to the baseline (week 8: p < 0.05; week 12: p < 0.01). However, no significant change in the VFA of subjects in the apple group that started with a normal VFA (VFA < 100 cm2) was exhibited by the 8- and 12-week marks. No clinical problems arose in the blood examinations or physical examinations for the long-term intake trial or the excessive intake trial. No adverse reaction was observed in either trial. These results demonstrated the efficacy and the safety of the beverage with apple polyphenols. © 2010 by Japan Oil Chemists' Society.


Sato K.,Asahi Soft Drinks Co. | Osawa T.,Nagoya University
Food Science and Technology Research | Year: 2010

The antioxidative fraction of roasted pearl barley (adlay, Coix lacryma-jobi L. var Ma-yuen Stapf), which is used in commercial tea beverages, was obtained by column chromatography and eluted with 70% ethanol. We investigated the effect of dietary supplementation with pearl barley extract on the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in rat serum and ex vivo tissues. We also investigated whether the serum and tissue homogenates were susceptible to lipid peroxidation. Rats that were fed a diet containing 5 g/kg pearl barley extract (antioxidative fraction) for 14 days exhibited no significant reduction in the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the serum. However, compared to controls, liver homogenates from rats fed pearl barley extract showed significantly lower susceptibility to lipid peroxidation (induced by 2,2′-azobis(2-amidinopropane)hydrochloride). These results demonstrate that a diet containing pearl barley extract increases oxidation resistance in ex vivo rat livers.


Trademark
Asahi Soft Drinks Co. and Calpis Co. | Date: 2011-05-24

Processed foodstuffs, namely, dietary supplements in the form of tablets, capsules, granules, liquid, gelatin or powder mainly consisting of milk, lactic acid bacteria, oligosaccharide, amino acid or peptide for the purpose of helping relieve allergy symptoms. Edible oils and fats; milk; fermented milk; other milk products, namely, cultured milk; meat; eggs; fish and shellfish; frozen vegetables; frozen fruits; meat products, namely, processed meat, dried meat, canned cooked meat, and meat extracts; processed marine products, namely, canned fish, smoked fish, fish cakes, processed fish roe, fish fillets, flakes of dried fish meat, and pickled fish; processed vegetables and processed fruits; fried bean curd, frozen and dried bean curd; jelly made for devils tongue root; soy milk; bean curd; curry stew; curry soup; [ layer ] * laver * for rice in tea; seasonings; beans, namely, baked beans, canned beans, dried beans; lactic acid drinks. Refreshing drinks, namely, non-alcoholic drinks in the nature of carbonated beverages and non-alcoholic soft drinks; fruit drinks; vegetable juice for drinking.


Trademark
Asahi Soft Drinks Co. | Date: 2010-07-13

soft drinks; fruit drinks.

Discover hidden collaborations