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News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

BlueInGreen co-founder Dr. Scott Osborn has been named the Engineer of the Year by the Arkansas section of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE). Osborn, who is also an associate professor of biological and agricultural engineering at the University of Arkansas, was chosen for his ongoing contributions to the engineering profession, both inside and outside of the classroom. In 2004, Osborn and Dr. Marty Matlock, a professor of biological and agricultural engineering at the University of Arkansas, co-founded BlueInGreen with support from VIC Technology Venture Development. Osborn holds 12 patents related to gas dissolution for water treatment, wastewater treatment, ecological restoration, oxidation and pH adjustment. "Dr. Osborn has been a friend and mentor to the entire team at BlueInGreen, but his impact reaches far beyond this company," said Product Manager Jessica Hart. "His ideas, innovation and instruction have directly and indirectly benefited many people around the world." A licensed professional engineer, Osborn served as BlueInGreen's President and Chief Technology Officer during its initial stages as a University of Arkansas startup and worked with its team of engineers to design and implement the company's first commercial installations. BlueInGreen's systems are currently being used at 27 sites in 14 states and Canada, treating over 700 million gallons of water each day. The company has contributed significantly to the economy of Arkansas through sales revenues, grants and investor funding. Osborn was previously named a Ford Foundation Design Fellow, where he worked to introduce engineering design into the curriculum at the Dwight Look College of Engineering. Osborn is also a recipient of the Massey-Ferguson Educational Gold Medal, awarded for the advancement of engineering knowledge and practice in agriculture soil. He has helped establish biological engineering programs at Louisiana State University, Texas A&M University and the University of Arkansas. "Dr. Osborn is a gifted engineer-educator who is a passionate and effective teacher," said Dr. Lalit Verma, Head of the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. "He utilizes his industry experience in preparing students to be successful engineers to address problems in sustainable food, water and energy systems." Osborn serves as a technical lead on BlueInGreen's Advisory Board. He is currently working in cooperation with BlueInGreen and Core Brewing Company, based in Springdale, Ark., to develop a new application for the company's pH adjustment line in order to make the beer carbonation process less expensive and more environmentally friendly, while also improving beverage quality. "We all owe a huge debt to Scott," said CEO Chris Milligan. "He's a one-of-a-kind teacher and entrepreneur, and his selflessness and leadership directly reflect our company's core values. In many ways, BlueInGreen would not be the same without Scott's early work." About ASABE ASABE is an international scientific and educational organization dedicated to the advancement of engineering applicable to agricultural, food and biological systems. Further information on the Society can be obtained by contacting ASABE at (269) 429-0300, emailing hq(at)asabe(dot)org or visiting asabe.org. About BlueInGreen BlueInGreen, LLC is a water treatment company that provides the world's most efficient method of delivering dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide and ozone into water. The company offers cost-effective solutions for aeration, pH adjustment, oxidation and odor control. For more information, visit blueingreen.com.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Liaison International today announced the timeline for launch of EngineeringCAS, a Centralized Application Service (CAS) that streamlines graduate degree application processing for participating colleges of engineering. Developed in collaboration with The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), EngineeringCAS will serve as a comprehensive marketplace for prospective graduate engineering students to learn more about graduate level engineering programs. Over the last two decades, Liaison has developed customized services with over 35 professional associations, streamlining admissions for a range of disciplines and fields. As with all Liaison-powered CASs, applicants who leverage EngineeringCAS will benefit from the service’s user-friendly, streamlined application process and a single portal to discover all available graduate programs in their field. Admissions officers will find value in an expanded global applicant pool and administrative task support that creates more time for holistic application review. “When it launches in August 2017, this accessible marketplace will create the most comprehensive and inclusive applicant pool possible for graduate level engineering programs,” said George Haddad, founder and CEO of Liaison. “Liaison is proud to partner with ASME and ASABE to enhance recruiting efforts and advance the engineering discipline as a whole.” While EngineeringCAS will be available for engineering programs in all fields, Liaison chose ASME and ASABE as its first partners for the endeavor because the vast difference in the size of the professional associations — ASME boasts over 130,000 members; ASABE, over 7,500 — speaks to EngineeringCAS’s intradisciplinary value. The fields of mechanical engineering, and agricultural and biological engineering also have unique needs that will be best met through a streamlined application process. "EngineeringCAS will help graduate programs have exposure to and awareness of a larger, more diverse pool of applicants domestically and internationally, with research aspirations that better align with the strengths of the programs,” shared Thomas G. Loughlin, executive director of ASME. “ASABE is excited to be affiliated with Liaison’s first-ever EngineeringCAS,” shared Darrin Drollinger, executive director of ASABE. “We see this as a tremendous opportunity to highlight graduate-level agricultural and biological engineering programs across the nation. Being a part of this effort from the start was important to us, and we’re thrilled with the potential it brings for simplifying the application process.” To learn more about this collaboration between Liaison, ASME, and ASABE, please visit http://engineeringcas.liaisoncas.org.


The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) have included five technologies from Case IH and four technologies from New Holland Agriculture in their annual AE50 Awards. This prestigious series acknowledges the year’s top 50 smart engineering product innovations introduced on the US market in 2016. LONDON, 21-Dec-2016 — /EuropaWire/ — Case IH and New Holland Agriculture, the two global agricultural machinery brands of CNH Industrial N.V. (NYSE: CNHI / MI: CNHI), have been included in the 2017 edition of the AE50 Awards. Determined and administered by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), the AE50 names the top 50 agricultural machinery product innovations to be presented each year. New product introductions are ranked each year according to the criteria of innovation, significant engineering advancement and impact on the market served. The winning innovations will be published in the January/February 2017 special issue of ASABE’s Resource: Engineering & Technology for a Sustainable World, a print publication dedicated to agricultural, biological and food system engineers worldwide. Case IH finishes off the year with five spots on the coveted list. The Rowtrac® Carrier System for the Case IH Early Riser® 2160 Rowtrac® Front-Fold Planterrepresents an industry-first as the only towed-implement track undercarriage that is pivotable about three major axes, allowing the track system to be steered while it simultaneously rolls to follow terrain changes. The Auxiliary Alternator Automation on the Case IH Early Riser® 2150 Front-Fold Planters is the first hydraulically driven auxiliary alternator drive system that uses smart technology to match electrical power generation with demand to minimize hydraulic flow requirements. The Tiger-Mate 255 Field Cultivator sets new agronomic standards for seedbed preparation with an enhanced shank assembly, split-the-middle sweep design and single-point hydraulic depth control. The Extended-Wear Rotor Inlet Transition Cone on the Case IH Axial-Flow® 240 Series Combine is manufactured using a heat-treatment process that makes its steel even more resistant to the abrasion and wear that challenge modern combines when harvesting specific and more-abrasive crops such as rice. The 4400 Series Corn Corporate Communications Head Stalk Roll Spirals design improves the harvesting capability of the corn head to ensure that all of the corn plant is processed and no corn kernels are left behind.​ Four innovations from New Holland Agriculture were also recognized on the AE50 list. The IntelliBale™ ISOBUS Class 3 Tractor & Baler automation for New Holland Roll-Belt™ Series automates the tractor and baling control functions, reducing operator fatigue and fuel consumption and enables the baler to control the tractor’s forward motion, bale wrapping, bale ejection, and tailgate closing. The SmartTrax™ with Flex Technology for New Holland CR and CX flagship combines offers an alternative to traction tires to reduce ground compaction and improve operator comfort. The CX/CR Everest 20 levelling system is a stand-alone kit that converts the combine harvester from a standard combine into an expert hill-climbing machine, while providing the advantages of operator comfort and harvesting capacity. The T7 Heavy Duty Enhanced Engine Brake feature is designed to reduce the load imposed upon the tractor and trailed equipment’s brakes when decelerating or holding a speed while descending a gradient. Case IH and New Holland Agriculture have worked closely over the years with ASABE in an effort to remain at the forefront of innovation and sustainability in the agricultural sector. Within CNH Industrial, the Company continues to fly the flag for innovation in the agricultural sector through its Innovation Department, global network of R&D centers and agriculture brands, whose work promotes the furthering of new technologies, data driven information and sustainable farming solutions. One of the most recent innovation developments saw the Company unveil its concept autonomous tractor technology through Case IH and New Holland Agriculture in August 2016 at the Farm Progress Show in Boone, Iowa. For more information visit the CNH Industrial Newsroom: http://bit.ly/2hsV8C2 CNH Industrial N.V. (NYSE: CNHI /MI: CNHI) is a global leader in the capital goods sector with established industrial experience, a wide range of products and a worldwide presence. Each of the individual brands belonging to the Company is a major international force in its specific industrial sector: Case IH, New Holland Agriculture and Steyr for tractors and agricultural machinery; Case and New Holland Construction for earth moving equipment; Iveco for commercial vehicles; Iveco Bus and Heuliez Bus for buses and coaches; Iveco Astra for quarry and construction vehicles; Magirus for firefighting vehicles; Iveco Defence Vehicles for defence and civil protection; and FPT Industrial for engines and transmissions. More information can be found on the corporate website: www.cnhindustrial.com


Choi D.,University of Florida | Lee W.S.,University of Florida | Ehsani R.,ASABE | Ehsani R.,University of Florida | Roka F.M.,University of Florida
Transactions of the ASABE | Year: 2015

The overall goal of this study was to develop a machine vision system to quantify dropped citrus fruits on the ground. Specific objectives were: (1) to build a machine vision system suitable for citrus grove field conditions, (2) to develop an image enhancement algorithm for varying illumination conditions, and (3) to develop an image processing algorithm to estimate citrus fruit drop count and mass. The image processing algorithm consisted of (1) illumination enhancement using a retinex algorithm, (2) classification, (3) segmentation using a watershed algorithm with h-minima transform, and (4) ellipse fitting for mass estimation. Performances of the algorithms were evaluated in terms of correct identification and false positive errors. The average correct identification rate was 88.1%, 83.6%, and 82.9% for logistic regression, k-nearest neighbor (kNN), and Bayesian classifiers, respectively. False positive errors were 13.7%, 40.9%, and 17.9% for logistic regression, kNN, Bayesian classifiers, respectively. The results demonstrate the system's ability to quantify dropped fruits with specific geo-referenced location information. Spatially varied fruit drop maps plotted from the results can assist growers in finding problematic areas in their citrus groves more efficiently while reducing inspection and treatment costs. Such maps can also facilitate treatment of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) disease in combination with HLB intensity data, psyllid counts, fertilization programs, and other block-specific management practices. © 2015 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers.


Samani Majd A.M.,Texas A&M University | Ashtari A.K.,Texas A&M University | Ashtari A.K.,University of Tehran | Riskowski G.L.,Texas A&M University | And 5 more authors.
Transactions of the ASABE | Year: 2015

Ammonia (NH3) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) are the source of a number of environmental issues. Wet spray scrubbers using non-acidic solutions might be a new approach for NH3 mitigation from AFOs. A lab-scale spray scrubber was built to clean 0.024 m3 s-1 of an NH3/air mixture with an average NH3 concentration of 20 ppmv. Three variables including contact time, nozzle type, and scrubbing solution were investigated to evaluate their effects on the ammonia removal efficiency of the scrubber. The contact times were set to 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 s, which were achieved by changing the elevation of the spray nozzle. Two types of spray nozzles were studied. The nozzles had full-cone spray patterns with different spray angles and different droplet sizes. Reverse osmosis (RO) water and two types of electrolyzed water (50 mg L-1 of free available chlorine, FAC) with pH = 9.0 and pH = 6.5 were tested as scrubbing solutions. The parameters were evaluated in 54 experiments, which included 18 treatments with three replications, to determine the effectiveness of the treatments in scrubbing NH3 gas from air. The maximum removal efficiency of 56% was achieved with the narrow-angle nozzle, 0.9 s contact time, and electrolyzed water with pH = 6.5. Therefore, within the ranges studied, increasing the contact time, decreasing the pH of the electrolyzed water, and using the narrow-angle nozzle increased the efficiency of the scrubber. The RO water captured more of the NH3 in the form of total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) than did the EW, which may indicate that EW forms chloramines in the scrubbing process. TAN is a desirable by-product because it can be used as fertilizer. EW may need to be used at pH levels lower than 6.5 to maintain FAC/TAN mass ratios lower than 7.6 in order to avoid N2, Cl2, and NH3 gas losses from the scrubbing solution. © 2015 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers.


Gupta S.K.,University of Florida | Ehsani R.,ASABE | Ehsani R.,University of Florida | Kim N.-H.,University of Florida
Transactions of the ASABE | Year: 2015

This article presents a part of the research work for the design and optimization of a fruit tree harvesting system using numerical methods. The analytical framework for the optimization is formulated based on a continuous canopy shaker that harvests citrus crops, primarily Valencia oranges (Citrus sinensis). Tree limbs are modeled analytically in the numerical based design optimization of a shaker that requires information regarding the limb configuration and properties. The objective of this study is to formulate a mathematical model to predict the configuration of primary limbs and to determine the properties of citrus wood. The tree limbs, thus proposed, are statistical prototypes or representations that account for the 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th percentiles of actual tree limbs from random individual citrus trees. Polynomial response surface models were developed to predict sectional properties of the statistical model of the tree limbs. The distributions of the secondary branches and fruits were also predicted to model their effect on the dynamic response of the tree limbs. A three-point bending test, specific gravity test, moisture content test, and damping test were conducted on freshly cut samples of citrus wood. An elastic modulus of 8.5 GPa and modulus of rupture of 67.3 MPa were calculated from a load-deflection curve, and a density of 1450.8 kg m-3, moisture content of 42%, and damping ratio of 10.78 were measured. Although the proposed methodology was developed for a canopy shaker, it could be easily implemented for other vibratory harvesters, such as limb shakers, foliage shakers, and over-the-row harvesters. © 2015 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers.


Vadas P.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Good L.W.,University of Wisconsin Madison | Panuska J.C.,University of Wisconsin Madison | Busch D.L.,ASABE | Larson R.A.,University of Wisconsin Madison
Transactions of the ASABE | Year: 2015

Phosphorus (P) loss from agriculture can compromise the quality of receiving water bodies. For cattle farms, P can be lost from cropland, pastures, and outdoor animal lots. We developed a new model that predicts annual runoff, total solids loss, and total and dissolved P loss from cattle lots. The model requires input for annual precipitation, lot surface type, soil test P for earthen lots, cattle number and type, frequency of cleaning, and percent vegetative cover. The model estimates annual runoff using a precipitation dataset and curve number, annual solids loss based on annual runoff, annual particulate P loss based on solid loss and manure and soil P content, and annual dissolved P loss for each runoff event. Testing showed that the model reliably estimated runoff, solids loss, and P loss from a wide variety of lots and was more accurate than other, currently used models. The new model provides a valuable tool for developing whole-farm estimates of P loss and more effectively targeting P loss mitigation practices.


Boac J.M.,ASABE | Boac J.M.,Kansas State University | Bhadra R.,ASABE | Bhadra R.,Kansas State University | And 11 more authors.
Transactions of the ASABE | Year: 2015

Storing grain in bulk storage units results in grain packing from overbearing pressure, which increases grain bulk density and storage unit capacity. This study compared pack factors of hard red winter (HRW) wheat in vertical storage bins using different methods: the existing packing model (WPACKING), the USDA Risk Management Agency (RMA) method, and the USDA Farm Service Agency Warehouse Licensing and Examination Division (FSA-W) method. Grain bins containing HRW wheat were measured in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Packing was measured in corrugated steel bins and reinforced concrete bins with diameters ranging from 4.6 to 31.9 m (15.0 to 104.6 ft) and equivalent level grain heights ranging from 4.1 to 41.6 m (13.4 to 136.6 ft). The predicted masses of compacted stored wheat based on WPACKING, RMA, and FSA-W were compared to the reported mass from scale tickets. Pack factors predicted by WPACKING ranged from 0.929 to 1.073 for steel bins and from 0.986 to 1.077 for concrete bins. Pack factors predicted by the RMA method ranged from 0.991 to 1.157 for steel bins and from 0.993 to 1.099 for concrete bins. Pack factors predicted by the FSA-W method ranged from 0.985 to 1.126 for steel bins and from 1.012 to 1.101 for concrete bins. The average absolute and median differences between the WPACKING-predicted mass and reported mass were 1.64% and -1.26%, respectively, for corrugated steel bins and 3.75% and 2.16%, respectively, for concrete bins. In most cases, WPACKING underpredicted the mass in corrugated steel bins and overpredicted the mass in concrete bins. Comparison of the RMA-predicted mass and reported mass showed an average absolute difference of 4.41% with a median difference of 1.91% for HRW wheat in steel bins and an average absolute difference of 3.25% with a median difference of 1.03% for concrete bins. For the FSA-W-predicted mass versus reported mass, the average absolute and median differences were 3.40% and 3.86%, respectively, for steel bins and 4.34% and 3.50%, respectively, for concrete bins. Most of the mass values were overpredicted by both the RMA and FSA-W methods. Some of the large differences observed for concrete bins can be attributed to the unique geometry of these bins and the difficulty in describing these bin shapes mathematically. Overall, compared to the reported mass, WPACKING predicted the mass of grain in the bins with less error than the current RMA and FSA-W methods. Some of the differences may be because the RMA and FSA-W methods do not include the effects of grain moisture content, bin wall type, and grain height on pack factors.


Satchithanantham S.,ASABE | Sri Ranjan R.,University of Manitoba | Bullock P.,University of Manitoba
Transactions of the ASABE | Year: 2014

Subsurface drainage is used for removing excess water from agricultural lands to improve productivity, although it can cause water quality problems downstream. Agricultural drainage is identified as one of the contributing factors to Lake Winnipeg's nutrient enrichment and subsequent water quality deterioration. It has been suggested that controlled drainage in the Lake Winnipeg watershed could be a potential best management practice (BMP). The objective of the study was to evaluate the flow and nutrient export through subsurface drainage by comparing free drainage with overhead irrigation (FDIR) and controlled drainage with subirrigation (CDSI) under potato crop. The experiment was carried out in southern Manitoba in a potato field with sandy loam soil using the same irrigation water source. Subsurface drainage was installed in 2009 at an average design depth of 0.9 m. Controlled drainage was accomplished by using drainage control structures at drainage outlets. Subirrigation was carried out by pumping water back through the subsurface drainage network. Drainage flow, nutrient export, and weather parameters were monitored during the growing seasons of 2010 and 2011. On average, controlled drainage reduced the flow volume by 91% in 2010 and 54% in 2011 compared to free drainage. The drainage volume from FDIR plots ranged from 13% to 53% of the rainfall received, while for CDSI plots it varied from 0% to 8%. In both years, average nitrate concentrations were lower in CDSI compared to FDIR plots. However, average phosphate concentrations were lower in 2010 and higher in 2011 under CDSI compared to FDIR. Compared to FDIR plots, average nitrate-N export from CDSI plots was reduced by 98% in 2010 and 67% in 2011. Average phosphate export was reduced by 94% in 2010; however, in 2011, it was 15% higher than FDIR. The majority of the export happened during the period dominated by heavy drainage outflow, which coincided with spring snowmelt. The nutrient export reduction by CDSI is attributed mainly to the drainage volume reduction by controlled drainage. © 2014 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers.


ElNesr M.,ASABE | Alazba A.,ASABE | Abu-Zreig A.,King Saud University
Applied Engineering in Agriculture | Year: 2010

Climate change and variability is receiving much attention recently. Changes in the world temperature and other natural phenomenon such as rainfall variability are being considered as indicators to climate change. These changes can have significant effect on water resources and therefore on the livelihood of society especially in water scarce countries such Saudi Arabia. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia suffers a chronic water scarcity, despite the fact that the agricultural sector consumes around 90% of the water budget in the kingdom. The objective of this article is to study the variability in reference evapotranspiration (ETo) demand over the kingdom during the period from 1980 to 2008 using Penman-Monteith formula and to identify possible changes in the ETo as an indicator to climate change in the region. Studying ETo can be an incomparable indicator for climate change because it involves various parameters including temperature, humidity, and wind speed. Identifying changes in ETo can also help in future planning of agriculture-water projects and identify lower and higher ETo zones for proper planning and management of agricultural projects in arid region. Results indicated that the average ETo varied from 5 mm/d in January to more than 15 mm/d in July with extreme value ranged from as low as 1.6 to 30 mm/d. The lowest ETo values were found in the southern region of the Kingdom during the month of November to February and starts to shift to the western region from the month of March to October. The results also indicated that the annual maximum and minimum daily averages of ETo steadily increased over the study period. The ETo annual daily average had increased from about 9.6 mm/d in 1980 to as high as 10.5 mm/d in 2008. Data analysis also revealed that the percentage areas of the Kingdom with high values of ETo depth, greater than 4000 mm/year, have also steadily increased in the study period from 25% to about 40%. On the other hand, areas having lower ETo values, less than 3600 mm/year have decreased over the studied area from about 30% in 1980 to as low as 12% of the kingdom total area. These results indicated clearly an increasing trend in the ETo over Saudi Arabia. © 2010 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers.

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