Arysta LifeScience Corporation

Chūō-ku, Japan

Arysta LifeScience Corporation

Chūō-ku, Japan
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Przybysz A.,Warsaw University of Life Sciences | Wrochna M.,Warsaw University of Life Sciences | Slowinski A.,Arysta LifeScience Ltd | Gawronska H.,Warsaw University of Life Sciences
Acta Scientiarum Polonorum, Hortorum Cultus | Year: 2010

Asahi SL stimulates plant's vital processes like growth and development, affects physiology and biochemistry, what often leads to increased biomass accumulation and yield. However, common is opinion that application of this preparation could be beneficial only, when treated plants are grown under unfavorable conditions. Therefore the aim of this work was the assessment of the stimulatory effect of Asahi SL on Arabi-dopsis thaliana L. and ornamental amaranth plants grown under optimal conditions. Plants treated with Asahi SL were higher and more advanced in development, particularly generative. Biomass accumulation was greater after biostimulator application mainly due to better photosynthetic apparatus efficiency, which was manifested by (i) greater leaf area, (ii) higher total chlorophyll content and (iii) increased intensity of photosynthesis. Effect of Asahi SL on chlorophyll a fluorescence was marginal. Despite of higher transpiration and lowered stomatal resistance the RWC was almost unchanged in biostimulator treated plants what was attributed to increased water uptake. Obtained results clearly showed that Asahi SL applied on plants can also be effective and beneficial when they are grown under optimal conditions.


Takatsuka J.,Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Okuno S.,Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Okuno S.,Arysta LifeScience Corporation | Nakai M.,Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Kunimi Y.,Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
Journal of Invertebrate Pathology | Year: 2016

Nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) are known to be highly variable, both genetically and phenotypically, at several scales such as different geographic locations or a single host. A previous study using several geographic isolates indicated that two types of NPV, Spodoptera littoralis NPV (SpliNPV) and S. litura NPV (SpltNPV) types, were isolated from the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura (Fabricius), a polyphagous insect that causes serious damage to many forage crops and vegetables. That study also indicated that the SpliNPV type was widely distributed in Japan. Here, we investigated the genotypic and phenotypic variation of cloned NPVs that infect S. litura; such variation is an important resource for biological control agents, and may represent the genetic diversity of an NPV species. Eighteen genotypically distinct NPVs were cloned from four field-collected NPV isolates using an in vivo cloning technique. They were divided into two virus types according to the similarity of banding patterns of DNA fragments generated by restriction endonucleases, and Southern hybridization analysis. Partial polyhedrin gene sequences revealed that the two types corresponded to SpliNPV and SpltNPV. Bioassays seem to suggest that the SpliNPV virus type was, overall, more infectious and killed S. litura larvae faster, but yielded fewer viral occlusion bodies, than the SpltNPV type. These data provide a basis for explaining the distribution pattern of SpliNPV and SpltNPV types in S. litura populations in Japan. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


Takatsuka J.,Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Okuno S.,Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Okuno S.,Arysta LifeScience Corporation | Ishii T.,Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Invertebrate Pathology | Year: 2010

Three entomopoxviruses (EPVs) isolated from diseased Adoxophyes honmai larvae at different localities (Tsukuba, Itsukaichi, and Miyazaki) in Japan were compared for biochemical identity and key parameters of virus fitness, fatal infection, speed of kill, and virus yield. When the structural peptides of occlusion bodies (OBs) and occlusion-derived viral particles were compared using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, no difference in banding patterns was observed. However, DNA restriction endonuclease analysis showed that the three isolates were genotypically different, but many commonly sized DNA fragments were observed. Five tortricid species, A. honmai, Adoxophyes orana, Adoxophyes dubia, Homona magnanima, and Archips insulanus were susceptible to all isolates. No significant differences in the key viral fitness parameters were detected among the isolates in A. orana. However, the Miyazaki isolate had a different effect on H. magnanima; it allowed infected insects to survive longer and develop to a larger size, but had a lower yield of OBs per larva at any given time to death. OB yields per unit cadaver weight for the Miyazaki isolate, which indicate the conversion rate of the insect to virus, were lower over time compared to the other two isolates. The implications for selecting a candidate isolate to control tortricid pests are discussed. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Trademark
Arysta LifeScience Corporation | Date: 2015-07-24

preparations for destroying vermin; fungicides, herbicides.


Nakahira K.,Japan Science and Technology Agency | Nakahira K.,Tropical Agriculture Research Front | Kashitani R.,Kochi University | Tomoda M.,Japan Science and Technology Agency | And 5 more authors.
Applied Entomology and Zoology | Year: 2010

The harmful side effects of 11 pesticides, 5 acaricides, and 10 fungicides on nymphs and adults of the predatory mirid bug Pilophorus typicus Distant (Heteroptera: Miridae) were determined by dipping them into solutions of each chemical. Two insect growth regulators (IGRs), buprofezin and cyromazine, were not harmful to nymphal survival of P. typicus on the fifth day. Flufenoxuron, lufenuron, and novaluron (also IGRs) were seriously harmful to nymphal survival of P. typicus on the fifth day. IGRs that were deleterious to nymphal survival were probably harmful because they regulated molting. Three insecticides, buprofezin, cyromazine, and pyridalyl; one acaricide, bifenazate; and four fungicides, boscalid, captan, iprodione, and triadimefon, were found to be inert pesticides for nymphs and adults of P. typicus.


Patent
Arysta Lifescience Corporation | Date: 2013-01-09

The invention relates to herbicidal active compound combinations comprising, carbamoyltriazolinones, and herbicidally active compounds, which combinations are suitable for controlling weeds.


Patent
Arysta Lifescience Corporation | Date: 2010-06-08

The invention relates to herbicidal active compound combinations comprising, carbamoyltriazolinones, and herbicidally active compounds, which combinations are suitable for controlling weeds.


Patent
Arysta LifeScience Corporation | Date: 2015-10-23

The disclosure includes a process for preparing fluoxostrobin which includes:


Patent
Arysta LifeScience Corporation | Date: 2014-07-03

The disclosure includes a process for preparing fluoxostrobin which includes:


Patent
Arysta Lifescience Corporation | Date: 2011-06-14

Compositions and methods are provided for synergistic pesticidal mixtures comprising a first pesticidal composition and a second pesticidal composition, wherein the pesticidal activity of the mixture exhibits synergistic effects compared with the expected effects of the mixtures based on the sum of the activity of the first pesticidal composition alone and the activity of the second pesticidal composition alone, wherein the pesticidal activity of the mixture allows the use of lower amounts of each component to achieve a desired level of control of the target pest, and/or provides a desired level of control of the target pest sooner after application of the mixture, compared with the amount and/or time required for first pesticidal composition alone, and the amount and/or time required for the second pesticidal composition alone, to achieve the same level of control. Synergistic pesticidal mixtures and methods according to the invention are provided comprising a first pesticidal composition comprising at least two essential oils, a carrier oil, and an emulsifier, and a second pesticidal composition comprising at least one insecticide, wherein the pesticidal activity of the mixture is greater than the sum of the activity of the first pesticidal composition alone and the activity of the second pesticidal composition alone. Methods are provided for screening and identifying synergistic pesticidal mixtures according to the invention.

Loading Arysta LifeScience Corporation collaborators
Loading Arysta LifeScience Corporation collaborators