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Koiwanit J.,University of Regina | Manuilova A.,ArticCan Energy Services Inc. | Chan C.,University of Regina | Wilson M.,University of Regina | Tontiwachwuthikul P.,University of Regina
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control | Year: 2014

For at least the next few decades, fossil fuels will be used to supply energy globally, and without a proper control technique, carbon dioxide (CO2) atmospheric emissions will continue to increase and pose an even more serious threat to human and environment. Therefore, the use of an effective carbon dioxide capture technology has become important in ensuring reduction of CO2 emissions. However, more raw materials and energy are required for the CO2 capture systems operation. Consequently, it is necessary to evaluate the environmental performance of the complete life cycle of the CO2 capture process in order to fully understand its environmental impacts. This study presents a life cycle assessment study on a hypothetical oxy-fuel combustion CO2 capture system in Saskatchewan, Canada. The study analyses the oxy-fuel carbon dioxide capture and compares it with the lignite coal fired electrical generating station that has no capture system. TRACI, the life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) method, is used to convert life cycle inventory data into environmental impacts. The observed results include a reduction in global warming and emissions to air impact categories due to capture of particulate matter (PM), trace elements, CO2 and acid gases. However, the emissions captured would eventually leach to soil and then to the ground water when landfilled. Thus, an increase in the impact categories associated with soil and water was also observed. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Zhou Q.,University of Regina | Manuilova A.,ArticCan Energy Services Inc. | Koiwanit J.,University of Regina | Piewkhaow L.,University of Regina | And 3 more authors.
Energy Procedia | Year: 2014

This paper presents a life cycle assessment (LCA) of three different carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies, namely postcombustion, pre-combustion and oxy-fuel capture. The Boundary Dam Power Station (BDPS) in Saskatchewan, Canada was chosen as a case study for modeling of operations at the electrical generating station. This study showed that CO2 capture technologies have the potential of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Where an increase in the impact categories associated with soil and water was observed, the release of pollutants to the atmosphere were reduced and became more manageable in their waste streams. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Source


Manuilova A.,ArticCan Energy Services Inc. | Koiwanit J.,University of Regina | Piewkhaow L.,University of Regina | Wilson M.,University of Regina | And 2 more authors.
Energy Procedia | Year: 2014

The environmental performance of a carbon dioxide (CO2) capture project at the Saskatchewan Power Corporation's (SaskPower) Boundary Dam Power Station in Estevan, Saskatchewan, Canada was evaluated using a life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Operations of the lignite coal fired electricity generating station with and without post-combustion CO2 capture and CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery (CO2-EOR) were modelled. The results showed a reduction in global warming and air impact categories. Even though increases in some categories associated with soil and water were observed, the broad distribution associated with atmospheric release was significantly reduced, which provided human health benefits that outweigh the negative of increased emissions. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Source


Piewkhaow L.,University of Regina | Chan C.W.,University of Regina | Manuilova A.,ArticCan Energy Services Inc. | Wilson M.,University of Regina | Tontiwachwuthikul P.,University of Regina
Carbon Management | Year: 2014

The methodology of life cycle assessment was applied for evaluating the environmental performance of a Saskatchewan lignite integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)-based electricity generation plant with and without the pre-combustion CO2 capture process. A comparison between the IGCC systems (with and without CO2 capture) and the competing lignite pulverized coal electricity generating station was conducted to reveal which technology offers more positive environmental effects. The results showed significant reduction of GHG emissions where both post- and pre-combustion CO2 capture processes are applied. With the application of the CO2 removal technology, GHG emissions were reduced by 27-86%. The performances of the IGCC systems were superior to those of the pulverized coal systems. However, in terms of other environmental impacts, multiple environmental trade-offs are involved depending on the capture technology. For the postcombustion CO2 capture process system, it was observed that the environmental impact was shifted from the air compartment to the soil and water compartments. The IGCC systems showed the same tendency of shifting from air pollution to soil and water pollution, but the amount of pollution is less significant. This is likely because the IGCC system operates at higher efficiencies; hence, it requires less fuel and produces fewer emissions. © 2015 Taylor & Francis. Source


Koiwanit J.,University of Regina | Manuilova A.,ArticCan Energy Services Inc. | Chan C.,University of Regina | Wilson M.,ArticCan Energy Services Inc. | Tontiwachwuthikul P.,University of Regina
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control | Year: 2016

Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology has become an available technology for ensuring reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from fossil-fuel based electricity generating plants. Since public acceptance of this technology depends critically on a reliable demonstration of its safety, it is important that the risks associated with carbon capture technology be fully understood so that standards and regulatory frameworks required for its deployment can be formulated.The objective of this paper is to evaluate the predicted risk to human health associated with the Boundary Dam Power Station (BDPS) close to Estevan, Saskatchewan, Canada. This study aims to predict the potential instead of actual risks to human health because real data from the power plants' stacks are unavailable. Instead, the study relies on data that were entirely derived from the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies (Koiwanit et al., 2014a,b; Manuilova, 2011). The risk assessment was conducted based on two tools: (i) the American Meteorological Society's Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD), and (ii) Health Canada's Air Quality Benefits Assessment Tool (AQBAT). The conventional lignite-fired electricity generation station at the BDPS is used as a reference case. This work presents the predicted risks to human health due to exposure to air pollution which has been released by the post-combustion carbon dioxide capture process, and compare the risks with those posed by the oxy-fuel CO2 capture technology.Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulates less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions were modeled in a circular pattern of 10 degree increments with 25 zones of 100 m on each increment. This study demonstrates that the reductions in the atmospheric concentrations of NO2, PM2.5, and SO2 accounted for the largest improvements in human health impacts, particularly in terms of acute respiratory, asthma symptoms, and restricted activity health outcomes. In addition, the oxy-fuel CO2 capture system reduced emissions to the atmosphere more effectively than the post-combustion CO2 capture technology. Therefore, the former technology's contribution to reducing air pollution is more significant than that of the latter. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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