Linz, Austria
Linz, Austria

Ars Electronica Linz GmbH is an Austrian cultural, educational and scientific institute active in the field of new media art, founded in 1979. It is based at the Ars Electronica Center, which houses the Museum of the Future, in the city of Linz. Ars Electronica’s activities focus on the interlinkages between art, technology and society. It runs an annual festival, and manages a multidisciplinary media arts R&D facility known as the Futurelab. It also confers the Prix Ars Electronica awards. Wikipedia.

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Most human interactions with robots come from behind a screen. Whether it's fiction or a real-life interaction, rarely are we put face to face with a robot. This poses a significant barrier when we look towards a future where robots will be part of our everyday lives. How do we break down this barrier? A recent study by researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau, University of Wurzburg, and Arts Electronica Futurelab, found that people who watched live interactions with a robot were more likely to consider the robot to have more human-like qualities. Constanze Schreiner (University of Koblenz-Landau), Martina Mara (Ars Electronica Futuerlab), and Markus Appel (University of Wurzburg) will present their findings at the 67th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association in San Diego, CA. Using a Roboy robot, participants observed one of three experimental human robot interactons (HRI); either in real life, in virtual reality (VR) on a 3D screen, or on a 2D screen. The scripted HRI between Roboy and the human technician was 4:25 minutes long. During that time, participants saw Roboy assisting the human in organizing appointments, conducting web searches and finding a birthday present for his mom. The data analyzed revealed that observing a live interaction or alternatively encountering the robot in a VR lead to more perceived realness. Furthermore, the kind of presentation influenced perceived human-likeness. Participants who observed a real HRI reported the highest perceived human-likeness. Particularly interesting is that participants who were introduced to Roboy in VR perceived the robot as less human-like than participants who watched a live HRI, whereas these two groups did not differentiate in regard of perceived realness. Usually, experimental studies interested in HRI and participants' evaluations of humanoid service robots - due to limited resources - need to fall back on video stimuli. This is the first study using participants' evaluations of a humanoid service robot when observed either on a 2D video, in 3D virtual reality, or in real life. "Many people will have their first encounter with a service robot over the next decade. Service robots are designed to communicate with humans in humanlike ways and assist them in various aspects of their daily routine. Potential areas of application range from hospitals and nursing homes to hotels and the users' households," said Schreiner. "To date, however, most people still only know such robots from the Internet or TV and are still skeptical about the idea of sharing their personal lives with robots, especially when it comes to machines of highly human-like appearance." "When R2-D2 Hops off the Screen: A Service Robot Encountered in Real Life Appears More Real and Humanlike Than on Video or in VR," by Constanze Schreiner, Martina Mara, and Markus Appel; to be presented at the 67th Annual International Communication Association Conference, San Diego, CA, 25-29 May 2017. Explore further: Image: Controlling robots at the Human Robot Interaction Laboratory


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Washington, DC (May 10, 2017) Most human interactions with robots come from behind a screen. Whether it's fiction or a real-life interaction, rarely are we put face to face with a robot. This poses a significant barrier when we look towards a future where robots will be part of our everyday lives. How do we break down this barrier? A recent study by researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau, University of Wurzburg, and Arts Electronica Futurelab, found that people who watched live interactions with a robot were more likely to consider the robot to have more human-like qualities. Constanze Schreiner (University of Koblenz-Landau), Martina Mara (Ars Electronica Futuerlab), and Markus Appel (University of Wurzburg) will present their findings at the 67th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association in San Diego, CA. Using a Roboy robot, participants observed one of three experimental human robot interactons (HRI); either in real life, in virtual reality (VR) on a 3D screen, or on a 2D screen. The scripted HRI between Roboy and the human technician was 4:25 minutes long. During that time, participants saw Roboy assisting the human in organizing appointments, conducting web searches and finding a birthday present for his mom. The data analyzed revealed that observing a live interaction or alternatively encountering the robot in a VR lead to more perceived realness. Furthermore, the kind of presentation influenced perceived human-likeness. Participants who observed a real HRI reported the highest perceived human-likeness. Particularly interesting is that participants who were introduced to Roboy in VR perceived the robot as less human-like than participants who watched a live HRI, whereas these two groups did not differentiate in regard of perceived realness. Usually, experimental studies interested in HRI and participants' evaluations of humanoid service robots - due to limited resources - need to fall back on video stimuli. This is the first study using participants' evaluations of a humanoid service robot when observed either on a 2D video, in 3D virtual reality, or in real life. "Many people will have their first encounter with a service robot over the next decade. Service robots are designed to communicate with humans in humanlike ways and assist them in various aspects of their daily routine. Potential areas of application range from hospitals and nursing homes to hotels and the users' households," said Schreiner. "To date, however, most people still only know such robots from the Internet or TV and are still skeptical about the idea of sharing their personal lives with robots, especially when it comes to machines of highly human-like appearance." "When R2-D2 Hops off the Screen: A Service Robot Encountered in Real Life Appears More Real and Humanlike Than on Video or in VR," by Constanze Schreiner, Martina Mara, and Markus Appel; to be presented at the 67th Annual International Communication Association Conference, San Diego, CA, 25-29 May 2017. Contact: To schedule an interview with the author or request a copy of the research, please contact John Paul Gutierrez, jpgutierrez@icahdq.org. The International Communication Association is an academic association for scholars interested in the study, teaching, and application of all aspects of human and mediated communication. With more than 4,300 members in 80 countries, ICA includes 31 Divisions and Interest Groups and publishes the Annals of the International Communication Association and five major, peer-reviewed journals: Journal of Communication, Communication Theory, Human Communication Research, Communication, Culture & Critique, and the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. For more information, visit http://www. .


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SiS-2010-3.0.3.1 | Award Amount: 1.65M | Year: 2011

Inspired by the merging of the artists studio with the research lab to create a hybrid creative space, STUDIOLAB proposes the creation of a new European platform for creative interactions between art and science. STUDIOLAB brings together major players in scientific research with centres of excellence in the arts and experimental design and leverages the existence of a new network of hybrid spaces to pilot a series of projects at the interface between art and science including Le Laboratoire (Paris), Science Gallery (Trinity College Dublin), Royal College of Art (London), Ars Electronica (Linz) and MediaLab Prado (Madrid) and STUDIOLAB will involve activities along three key dimensions: incubation of art-science projects, education and public engagement.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ISSI-1-2014 | Award Amount: 3.57M | Year: 2015

SPARKS is an awareness-raising and engagement project to promote Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) across 29 European countries (EU members plus Switzerland). It gathers 33 organisations as partners and linked Third Parties. SPARKS will organise an interactive touring exhibition and 232 innovative participatory activities on RRI (science cafs, pop-up Science Shops, incubation activities and scenario workshops) across Europe. The European dimension of the project is paired with a strong emphasis on local implementation through 29 experienced science communicators (one per country) that will adapt the exhibition and activities to their contexts and establish local multi-stakeholder collaborative partnerships. SPARKS will deploy complementary dissemination tools and actions to maximise its outreach and impact. It will collect and analyse important data on RRI throughout Europe and build on its learning to: - Further build the capacity of science actors and policy makers to promote RRI; - Better understand societys vision, interests and readiness concerning RRI in health; - Provide policy recommendations to feed R&I policies with societal inputs and facilitate RRI; - Develop the capacity of a group of European stakeholders to participate in RRI. SPARKS will use the appealing topic technology shifts in health and medicine to reach out to a wider public, make the RRI concept meaningful to it and establish a direct link with one of the priority societal challenges of Horizon 2020. Creative disruptions in the form of artistic inputs and questioning will help it to engage more stakeholders. SPARKS builds upon a number of relevant EU projects from RRI Tools to PERARES, from PLACES to VOICES or Twist and powerful European/ international networks the European Network of Science Centres and Museums (Ecsite), the international network of Science Shops (Living Knowledge) and the European Regions Research and Innovation Network (ERRIN).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-36-2016 | Award Amount: 1.04M | Year: 2017

Science, technology and arts limn a nexus at which observers have identified extraordinarily high potential for innovation. And innovation is precisely whats called for if were to master the social, ecological and economic challenges that Europe will be facing in the future. The STARTS Prize initiative will focus on the most forward looking collaborations at the crossings of art, science, technology, industry and society, will showcase achievements and encourage further collaborations and will honor the inspiring individuals and teams behind these achievements. Here, art is assigned the role of catalyst that propagates scientific and technological knowledge and skills among the general public and triggers innovative processes. Accordingly, the STARTS Prize is emphasizing, on one hand, artistic works that influence or change the way we look at technology, and, on the other hand, very promising forms of collaboration between the private sector and the world of art and culture. 8 prizewinning projects will be singled out for recognition in both categories and will be awarded each with 20,000. To provide the best possible environment for an international launch of the STARTS prize the project is linked to the PRIX ARS ELECTRONICA, one of the worlds premier awards honoring creativity and innovativeness at the interface of art, technology, science and society. The collaboration with the renowned institutions Ars Electronica, Waag Society and BOZAR allows a fast introduction to the relevant communities on an international scale and provide the necessary expertise. Their large international network assures recruiting the best possible experts to ensure a high quality in the evaluation and selection of the prize winners. The presentation of the awards and the exhibition of the prize winning works at the Ars Electronica Festival, the BOZAR Electronic Art Festival, Waag Society and eight additional major events will foster a high interest and establish reputation for the STARTS prize.


News Article | January 13, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

Intel set a new Guinness World Record for the "Most Unmanned Aerial Vehicles airborne simultaneously" with its "Drone 100" project staged at Flugplatz Ahrenlohe, Tornesch, Germany. While the spectacular event occurred live in November, the company was able to show the footage in public for the first time at the recently concluded CES in Las Vegas. The performance involved 100 small light-equipped unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that looked like fireflies in the evening sky. The drones made a number of interesting formations and moved in sync with music coming from a live orchestra, which played the famous Fifth Symphony of Beethoven. "Tonight, we're gonna have a hundred drones up in the sky, synced up with the orchestra. We're gonna show an audience something a little bit different and it's all happening in Tornesch airport near Hamburg," said Intel's Natalie Cheung in the video that Guinness World Records uploaded on YouTube. Pravin Patel, the official adjudicator from Guinness World Records, was at the event to personally witness and verify the record. He also congratulated the technology company after the successful display. Intel CEO Brian Krzanich said that Drone 100 redefined the fireworks experience while eliminating the inherent risks that are expected from using traditional pyrotechnics. "The past can be replaced by new creativity powered by drones," said Krzanich at the CES. "This is what it means to reinvent experiences using new technology." Horst Hoertner, senior director of Ars Electronica's Futurelab, said that Drone 100 is meant to show a different side to drones, which are known to many as weapons. The breathtaking performance revealed that drones can actually be used to create beauty and deliver experiences that are socially meaningful. The team of flight controllers was led by Martin Morth. He and Florian Berger, Andreas Jalsovec and Benjamin Olsen controlled 25 drones each as these lifted off from the Ahrenlohe Airfield in Tornesch. Prior to the drone display, a number of preparations were made in order to ensure that the drones will sync with the music from the orchestra. This included creating a software for the drones' flight paths and turning their lights on and off. The choreography was led by Andreas Jalsovec of Futurelab, who described the software as an animation that needed a strong computing prowess. "We just took technology and made art out of it," said Jalsovec. Cheung said that the company is working with aviation entities in order for them to get a good grasp on certain policies, rules and regulations that are all necessary to ensure safety in using drones, particularly in light shows. "We can work together on different goals to make sure that it's safe," said Cheung. Drone 100 surpassed Futurelab's 2012 record of flying 49 LED-equipped quadcopters all at once. Watch the spectacular show in the video below.


Intel joined forces with Ars Electronica Futurelab to set the Guinness World Record for having the most number of unmanned aerial vehicles in the air at the same time, but that's just skimming the surface. Intel is very enthusiastic about drones. In fact, Intel's boss Brian Krzanich said at the 2016 CES in Las Vegas that drones will light up the skies to replace fireworks down the road. "I see a future where fireworks and all their risks of smoke and dirt are a thing of the past, and they're replaced by shows that have unlimited creativity and potential – and powered by drones," he said. Back in August last year, the company invested $60 million in Chinese drone maker Yuneec Holding. German drone maker Ascending Technologies also moved under Intel's umbrella on Jan. 4, 2016. The company likewise made an undisclosed investment in Airware of San Francisco. "Intel gains expertise and technology to accelerate the deployment of Intel RealSense technology into the fast growing drone market segment," Intel says in a blog post about having Ascending Technologies on board. The company will continue to work with the Ascending Technologies team to keep on providing support for its present customers while also working hand-in-hand with Intel's Perceptual Computing team to come up with a UAV technology that will soon "help drones fly with more awareness of their environments." On Nov. 4, 2015, Intel and Futurelab pre-programmed 100 drones and launched them in the sky to show off a spectacular light show synchronized with Beethoven's Fifth Symphony played by a live orchestra. Albeit the show was filmed last year, the video was initially showcased during the keynote speech of Krzanich at the 2016 CES on Jan. 5. These drones, which were fitted with LEDs, concurrently lit up the skies over Ahrenlohe Airfield near Hamburg, Germany for seven minutes. They climbed as high as 328 feet to show off their choreographed routines. The light show ended with the drones forming the 250-meter wide (820 feet) logo of Intel. A Guiness World Record judge was present during the show to verify and award the new record to the two companies. Horst Hörtner, Ars Electronica Futurelab's director, said the new record is a result of the companies' years of hard work. "Drone 100 was a crazy idea that came out of a hallway conversation inside Intel, and now it has become a reality," said Anil Nanduri, the general manager of New Markets in Intel's Perceptual Computing Group. "Working with Ars Electronica Futurelab, we were able to create a formation of 100 UAVs in the sky, creating amazing images and ending with the Intel logo." Weighing 700 grams (1.5 pounds) each, the quadcopters were built by Ascending Technologies. Futurelab member Andreas Jalsovec said Intel developed the ground controls software, which required a powerful computer to make the show possible. Chief pilot Martin Morth said that drones do not always look at people, "sometimes, it's the drones that you should be looking at." You can watch the video below.


News Article | January 14, 2016
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

On November 4, 2015, a marvelous sight appeared in the night sky near Hamburg, Germany at the Ahrenlohe Airfield. A team assembled by Intel and Ars Electronica Futurelab flew 100 unmanned drones above the Ahrenloe Airfield, not far from the city, creating series of extraordinary 3-D light sculptures, flashing and dancing to the soundtrack of a live orchestra playing below. The team broke the world record in a category few people have probably heard of:  Most Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) Airborne Simultaneously.


News Article | March 10, 2015
Site: www.aec.at

Nick Ervinck is a master of 3D printing. In an interview with Ars Electronica he talks about the sources of inspiration for his organic and surreal sculptures and why he is so fascinated about 3D printing.


News Article | February 5, 2014
Site: www.wired.com

*The Vienna duo here are indestructible. They’re like a flourishing rosebush growing out of a cement sidewalk crack. Every wannabe tech-artist should study their efforts and see how they just plain invented themselves and their milieu. # a lot of material is online about our “Digital Quarter Century” projects in 2013, Ars Electronica : http://www.flickr.com/photos/stationrose/sets/72157635582410332/ # plus our book “20 Digital Years plus” is online at issuu now. http://issuu.com/stationrose/docs/str_20_digitalyears_plus-book Station Rose received the City of Linz Lifetime Award 2012 for their artistic work. ………………………………………………………….

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