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Vodouhe R.,Bioversity International | Dansi A.,University Abomey Calavi | Dansi A.,Aromatic and Medicinal Plant Biodiversity Research and Development Institute IRDCAM
The Scientific World Journal | Year: 2012

All over the world, plant domestication is continually being carried out by local communities to support their needs for food, fibre, medicine, building materials, etc. Using participatory rapid appraisal approach, 150 households were surveyed in 5 villages selected in five ethnic groups of Benin, to investigate the local communities motivations for plant domestication and the contributions of this process to in situ conservation of genetic resources. The results indicated differences in plant domestication between agroecological zones and among ethnic groups. People in the humid zones give priority to herbs mainly for their leaves while those in dry area prefer trees mostly for their fruits. Local communities were motivated to undertake plant domestication for foods (80 of respondents), medicinal use (40 of respondents), income generation (20 of respondents) and cultural reasons (5 of respondents). 45 of the species recorded are still at early stage in domestication and only 2 are fully domesticated. Eleven factors related to the households surveyed and to the head of the household interviewed affect farmers decision making in domesticating plant species. There is gender influence on the domestication: Women are keen in domesticating herbs while men give priority to trees. Copyright © 2012 R. Vodouh and A. Dansi. Source


Dansi A.,University Abomey Calavi | Dansi A.,Aromatic and Medicinal Plant Biodiversity Research and Development Institute IRDCAM | Adoukonou-Sagbadja H.,University Abomey Calavi | Adoukonou-Sagbadja H.,Aromatic and Medicinal Plant Biodiversity Research and Development Institute IRDCAM | Vodouhe R.,Bioversity International
Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution | Year: 2010

Fonio (Digitaria exilis (Kipp.) Stapf, white fonio; Digitaria iburua Stapf, black fonio), is one of the oldest native, but neglected, cereal crops of cultural, nutritional and economic importance of West Africa. To gather key information that will help to preserve its diversity in Benin and develop modern and well-adapted varieties that could meet both farmers' and consumers' needs, a participatory research appraisal survey was conducted in 15 villages randomly selected in the fonio production zone of Benin. Altogether 15 farmer-named landraces were recorded and further grouped into five morphotypes of which four belong to D. exilis and one to D. iburua. The number of landraces inventoried varied from one to five per village (three on average) and from one to three per household. Their distribution and extent are presented and their importance in terms of genetic resources conservation is discussed. Farmers' preferences for fonio varieties were assessed and eight preference criteria (earliness, culinary characteristics, ease of processing, productivity, facility of harvesting, grains size, storability, and drought tolerance) were identified and prioritised according to the gender. The traditional seed supply system and on-farm seed maintenance were investigated. Two plant species (Digitaria horizontalis Willd. and Digitaria longiflora (Retz.) Pers.) were reported by farmers as putative parents of cultivated fonio. Of these, only Digitaria longiflora has interesting agronomic traits (erect habit; stem long, big, strong and resistant to lodging; panicle long and rich in grains; large sized seeds) that are useful for the improvement of cultivated fonio. In the entire study area, the crop is under threat. Therefore, concerted efforts should be deployed to preserve its diversity and increase its use to combat food insecurity and malnutrition in Benin. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. Source


Loko Y.L.,University Abomey Calavi | Dansi A.,University Abomey Calavi | Dansi A.,Aromatic and Medicinal Plant Biodiversity Research and Development Institute IRDCAM | Tamo M.,Institute International dAgriculture Tropicale IITA | And 6 more authors.
The Scientific World Journal | Year: 2013

Twenty-five villages of Northern Benin were surveyed to identify the constraints of yam chips production, assess the diversity of storage insects on yam chips, and document farmers' perception of their impacts on the stocks and their traditional management practices. Damages due to storage insects (63.9% of responses) and insufficiency of insect-resistant varieties (16.7% of responses) were the major constraints of yam chips production. Twelve insect pest species were identified among which Dinoderus porcellus Lesne (Coleoptera, Bostrichidae) was by far the most important and the most distributed (97.44% of the samples). Three predators (Teretrius nigrescens Lewis, Xylocoris flavipes Reuter, and Alloeocranum biannulipes Montrouzier & Signoret) and one parasitoid (Dinarmus basalis Rondani) all Coleoptera, Bostrichidae were also identified. The most important traditional practices used to control or prevent insect attack in yam chips were documented and the producers' preference criteria for yam cultivars used to produce chips were identified and prioritized. To further promote the production of yam chips, diversification of insect-resistant yam varieties, conception, and use of health-protective natural insecticides and popularization of modern storage structures were proposed. © 2013 Y. L. Loko et al. Source


Dansi A.,University Abomey Calavi | Dansi A.,Aromatic and Medicinal Plant Biodiversity Research and Development Institute IRDCAM | Vodouhe R.,Bioversity International | Azokpota P.,University Abomey Calavi | And 6 more authors.
The Scientific World Journal | Year: 2012

Many of the plant species that are cultivated for food across the world are neglected and underutilized. To assess their diversity in Benin and identify the priority species and establish their research needs, a survey was conducted in 50 villages distributed throughout the country. The study revealed 41 neglected and underutilized crop species (NUCS) among which 19 were identified as of priority base on 10 criteria among which included their extent and degree of consumption. Reasons for neglect vary with the producers and the agricultural technicians. Market surveys revealed that NUCS are important source of household incomes and substantially contribute to poverty reduction. Review of the literature available revealed that most of the species are rich in nutrients and have some proven medicinal values and the promotion of their use would help in combating malnutrition and improving the health status of the local populations. The knowledge gaps and research needs are immense on most of the species identified as no concrete scientific data is nationally available. In terms of research, almost all has to be done starting from basic ethnobotanical investigation. The results will help the scientists and students willing to conduct research on NUCS in Benin to better orient their research programs. Copyright 2012 A. Dansi et al. Source


Adjatin A.,University Abomey Calavi | Dansi A.,University Abomey Calavi | Dansi A.,Aromatic and Medicinal Plant Biodiversity Research and Development Institute IRDCAM | Eze C.S.,University of Nigeria | And 5 more authors.
Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution | Year: 2012

Thirty five villages randomly selected across ethnic and agro-ecological zones of Benin were surveyed to document the indigenous knowledge associated with the domestication (bringing into cultivation), production and utilization of vegetable Gbolo (Crassocephalum spp.). The study revealed the existence of different morphotypes (1-4 per village) corresponding to two botanical species (Crassocephalum rubens (Juss. ex Jacq.) S. Moore) and (Crassocephalum crepidioides (Benth.) S. Moore) found unequally distributed throughout the country. The domestication (bringing into cultivation from the wild) of Gbolo was started in many villages and with some tribes in southern Benin, the vegetable is already being produced in sole cropping for commercial purposes. Regular consumption (49.90 % of responses) and scarcity (20.30 % of responses) were the two main reasons attributed by the interviewees for domestication of the vegetable. The cultural practices recorded were of five categories. The commonest cropping system found was mixed or inter-row cropping (92.31 % of producers) with either vegetable crops (53.85 % of producers) or non-vegetable crops (38.46 % of users). Sauce prepared with either fresh or dried leaves was the main type of preparation of Gbolo and the vegetable was reported to possess special nutritional and medicinal values. For further promotion, important researches directions are suggested. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Source

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