Armen Instrument

Saint-Avé, France

Armen Instrument

Saint-Avé, France
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Mandova T.,University of Paris Descartes | Audo G.,Armen Instrument | Michel S.,University of Paris Descartes | Grougnet R.,University of Paris Descartes
Phytochemistry Letters | Year: 2017

Two different centrifugal partition chromatography devices, Spot CPC and Quantum CPC, have been evaluated for the purification of swertiamarin from a methanolic extract of Centaurium erythraea. By using the same solvents system on isocratic and gradient mode, enriched fractions have been obtained and examined by HPLC-UV. The results are discussed, as well as various parameters such as rotation speed, flow rate and productivity. © 2017 Phytochemical Society of Europe.


Sfecci E.,CNRS Institute of Chemistry | Le Quemener C.,ARMEN Instrument | Lacour T.,DuPont Company | Massi L.,CNRS Institute of Chemistry | And 3 more authors.
Phytochemistry Letters | Year: 2017

Caulerpenyne (Cyn) is a cytotoxic compound firstly isolated in 1978 from Caulerpa prolifera. This metabolite, constituted by a highly reactive diacetoxybutadiene moiety, exhibited a wide range of biological properties with mainly antibacterial properties and antitumoral activities. Few structure-activity relationships (SAR) are available to design more potent bioactive derivatives by pharmacomodulation. Cyn can be produced by total synthesis or extracted from natural sources in particular the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia. Since conventional chromatographic procedures to isolate Cyn from C. taxifolia are time- and solvent-consuming, it was crucial to find a more efficient process to obtain pure Cyn. In our study, Cyn has been purified from C. taxifolia with two different techniques: Centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) and a classical chromatographic process. The comparative study showed that CPC constitutes a very simple and efficient process to access Cyn. © 2017 Phytochemical Society of Europe.


Simmler C.,University of Illinois at Chicago | Nikolic D.,University of Illinois at Chicago | Lankin D.C.,University of Illinois at Chicago | Yu Y.,University of Illinois at Chicago | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Natural Products | Year: 2014

Licorice botanicals are produced from the roots of Glycyrrhiza species (Fabaceae), encompassing metabolites of both plant and rhizobial origin. The composition in both primary and secondary metabolites (1°/2°Ms) reflects the physiologic state of the plant at harvest. Interestingly, the relative abundance of 1°Ms vs 2°Ms in licorice extracts remains undetermined. A centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) method was developed to purify liquiritin derivatives that represent major bioactive 2°Ms and to concentrate the polar 1°Ms from the crude extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis. One objective was to determine the purity of the generated reference materials by orthogonal UHPLC-UV/LC-MS and qHNMR analyses. The other objectives were to evaluate the presence of 1°Ms in purified 2°Ms and define their mass balance in a crude botanical extract. Whereas most impurities could be assigned to well-known 1°Ms, p-hydroxybenzylmalonic acid, a new natural tyrosine analogue, was also identified. Additionally, in the most polar fraction, sucrose and proline represented 93% (w/w) of all qHNMR-quantified 1°Ms. Compared to the 2°Ms, accounting for 11.9% by UHPLC-UV, 1°Ms quantified by qHNMR defined an additional 74.8% of G. uralensis extract. The combined orthogonal methods enable the mass balance characterization of licorice extracts and highlight the relevance of 1°Ms, and accompanying metabolites, for botanical quality control. © 2014 The American Chemical Society and American Society of Pharmacognosy.


Cakova V.,CNRS Laboratory for Therapeutic Innovation | Urbain A.,CNRS Laboratory for Therapeutic Innovation | Le Quemener C.,Armen Instrument | Audo G.,Armen Instrument | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Separation Science | Year: 2015

Vandaterosides are polar glucosyloxybenzyl eucomate derivatives found in Vanda teres (Orchidaceae), which display biological activities that slow the skin ageing process. In order to obtain larger quantities to allow us to go further in the bioassays, the hydroalcoholic extract of aerial parts (leaves and stems) of V. teres were fractionated by centrifugal partition chromatography, combining isocratic, gradient, and dual elution modes. The first fractionation was performed on the extract maintained in the stationary phase as water saturated in butanol, while increasing the polarity of the mobile phase by changing the proportions of ethyl acetate/1-butanol/water, in order to obtain two enriched fractions. Vandateroside I was then purified by isocratic mode with ethyl acetate/ethanol/water (46:14:40), while vandateroside II was obtained by combining isocratic elution with ethyl acetate/isopropanol/water (30:20:50) followed by a multiple dual mode with ethyl acetate/ethanol/water (46:14:40). In this manner, hundreds of milligrams of vandateroside I and II were recovered from 10 g of V. teres extract. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


PubMed | Armen Instrument, LVMH Recherche and CNRS Laboratory for Therapeutic Innovation
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of separation science | Year: 2015

Vandaterosides are polar glucosyloxybenzyl eucomate derivatives found in Vanda teres (Orchidaceae), which display biological activities that slow the skin ageing process. In order to obtain larger quantities to allow us to go further in the bioassays, the hydroalcoholic extract of aerial parts (leaves and stems) of V. teres were fractionated by centrifugal partition chromatography, combining isocratic, gradient, and dual elution modes. The first fractionation was performed on the extract maintained in the stationary phase as water saturated in butanol, while increasing the polarity of the mobile phase by changing the proportions of ethyl acetate/1-butanol/water, in order to obtain two enriched fractions. Vandateroside I was then purified by isocratic mode with ethyl acetate/ethanol/water (46:14:40), while vandateroside II was obtained by combining isocratic elution with ethyl acetate/isopropanol/water (30:20:50) followed by a multiple dual mode with ethyl acetate/ethanol/water (46:14:40). In this manner, hundreds of milligrams of vandateroside I and II were recovered from 10 g of V. teres extract.

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