Fayetteville, AR, United States
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Du W.,University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff | Ghetmiri S.,University of Arkansas | Al-Kabi S.,University of Arkansas | Mosleh A.,University of Arkansas | And 8 more authors.
2016 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO 2016 | Year: 2016

A Ge0.95Sn0.05/Ge0.9Sn0.1/Ge0.95Sn0.05 single quantum well was grown on Si via chemical vapor deposition. Temperature-dependent Photoluminescence shows the emission peak from the GeSn well. The studied structure aims for group-IV based efficient light source on Si. © 2016 OSA.


Pham T.,University of Arkansas | Du W.,University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff | Tran H.,University of Arkansas | Margetis J.,3440 East University Drive | And 7 more authors.
2016 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO 2016 | Year: 2016

A double heterostructure Ge/Ge0.9Sn0.1/Ge photodiode detector grown on Si was systematically characterized. Temperature-dependent device performance has been investigated. A cutoff wavelength of 2.6 μm and the peak responsivity of 0.19 A/W at 300 K were achieved. © 2016 OSA.


Pham T.N.,University of Arkansas | Du W.,University of Arkansas | Conley B.R.,University of Arkansas | Margetis J.,3440 East University Drive | And 5 more authors.
Electronics Letters | Year: 2015

High performance Si-based Ge0.9Sn0.1 photoconductive infrared detectors have been demonstrated. The device fabrication is fully compatible with the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. The room temperature responsivity at 1.55 μm is 0.26 A/W and comparable with that of commercially available InGaAs and Ge photovoltaic detectors. Temperature-dependent study shows an increased peak responsivity of 2.85 A/W at 77 K. The spectral response has a longwave cutoff of 2.4 and 2.2 μm at 300 and 77 K, respectively. Specific detectivity (D∗) was calculated and compared side by side with D∗ of market dominating infrared detectors. © 2015 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.


Ghetmiri S.A.,University of Arkansas | Du W.,University of Arkansas | Margetis J.,3440 East University Drive | Mosleh A.,University of Arkansas | And 10 more authors.
Applied Physics Letters | Year: 2014

Material and optical characterizations have been conducted for epitaxially grown Ge1-xSnx thin films on Si with Sn composition up to 10%. A direct bandgap Ge0.9Sn0.1 alloy has been identified by temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) study based on the single peak spectrum and the narrow line-width. Room temperature PL emission as long as 2230 nm has also been observed from the same sample. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.


Conley B.R.,University of Arkansas | Margetis J.,3440 East University Drive | Du W.,University of Arkansas | Tran H.,University of Arkansas | And 8 more authors.
Applied Physics Letters | Year: 2014

Thin-film Ge0.9Sn0.1 structures were grown by reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition and were fabricated into photoconductors on Si substrates using a CMOS-compatible process. The temperature-dependent responsivity and specific detectivity (D∗) were measured from 300 K down to 77 K. The peak responsivity of 1.63 A/W measured at 1.55 μm and 77 K indicates an enhanced responsivity due to photoconductive gain. The measured spectral response of these devices extends to 2.4 μm at 300 K, and to 2.2 μm at 77 K. From analysis of the carrier drift and photoconductive gain measurements, we have estimated the carrier lifetime of this Ge0.9Sn0.1 thin film. The longest measured effective carrier lifetime of 1.0 × 10-6 s was observed at 77 K. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.


Pham T.,University of Arkansas | Du W.,University of Arkansas | Margetis J.,3440 East University Dr | Ghetmiri S.A.,University of Arkansas | And 7 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2015

Si based Ge1-xSnx photoconductors, with Sn incorporation of 0.9, 3.2, and 7%, were fabricated using a CMOS-compatible process. Temperature dependent study was conducted from 300 to 77 K. The first generation device (standard photoconductor, PD) shows long wavelength cut-off beyond 2.1 μm for 7%-Sn devices at room temperature. The peak responsivity and D∗ of the 7% Sn device at 1.55 μm were obtained at 77K as 0.08 A/W and 1×109 cm∗Hz1/2∗W-1, respectively. Improved responsivity and specific detectivity (D∗) were observed on second generation devices by a newly designed electrode structure (photoconductor with interdigitated electrodes, IEPD). The enhancement factor of responsivity was up to 15 at 77 K. © 2015 SPIE.


Du W.,University of Arkansas | Pham T.,University of Arkansas | Margetis J.,40 East University Dr | Tran H.,University of Arkansas | And 8 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2015

In this work, high performance GeSn photoconductor and light emitting diodes (LED) have been demonstrated. For the photoconductor, the high responsivity was achieved due to high photoconductive gain, which is attributed to the novel optical and electrical design. The longwave cutoff at 2.4 μm was also observed at room temperature. For LED, temperature-dependent study was conducted. The electroluminescence (EL) spectra at different temperatures were obtained and EL peak shift was observed. Moreover, the emission power at different temperatures was measured. High power emission at 2.1 μm was achieved. © COPYRIGHT SPIE. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.


Pham T.,University of Arkansas | Du W.,University of Arkansas | Tran H.,University of Arkansas | Margetis J.,ASM | And 6 more authors.
Optics Express | Year: 2016

Normal-incidence Ge1-xSnx photodiode detectors with Sn compositions of 7 and 10% have been demonstrated. Such detectors were based on Ge/Ge1-xSnx/Ge double heterostructures grown directly on a Si substrate via a chemical vapor deposition system. A temperaturedependence study of these detectors was conducted using both electrical and optical characterizations from 300 to 77 K. Spectral response up to 2.6 μm was achieved for a 10% Sn device at room temperature. The peak responsivity and specific detectivity (D∗) were measured to be 0.3 A/W and 4 × 109 cmHz1/2W-1 at 1.55 μm, respectively. The spectral D∗ of a 7% Sn device at 77 K was only one order-of-magnitude lower than that of an extended-InGaAs photodiode operating in the same wavelength range, indicating the promising future of GeSn-based photodetectors. © 2016 Optical Society of America.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 562.50K | Year: 2016

ABSTRACT:Silicon-based lasers/detectors have long been desired for owing to the possibility of monolithic integration of photonics with high-speed Si electronics and the aspiration of broadening the reach of Si technology by expanding its functionalities well beyond electronics. The goal of this project is to develop high quality SiGeSn material and also use it to demonstrate high performance optoelectronic devices. The research plan includes growth of mid-IR SiGeSn materials and material characterization as well as development of GeSn mid-IR detectors and lasers. The innovative claims include: i) using novel techniques such as Plasma Enhancement and Atomic Hydrogen Enhancement to study the material growth technique; ii) using commercial CVD reactor for device quality SiGeSn growth, iii) high performance GeSn based photodetectors with high responsivity, high gain-bandwidth product, low dark current, CMOS compatibility, and extended spectra response, iv) GeSn based lasers transforming the new active direct band gap material to the all group-IV inter-band lasers on Si. The work will create significant impacts to the scientific community by enabling the so-called Si optoelectronics superchip, to extend the current Si-photonics wavelength range to mid-infrared, and to enable numerous commercial applications in telecom, consuming electronics, and sensing.BENEFIT:CVD growth techniques for future SiGeSn material growth; Devices such as LEDs, lasers, and detectors with applications in telecom, consuming electronics, and sensing.

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