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Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain

Yanes Y.,University of Granada | Miguel J.,University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria | Santana A.,University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria | Deniz F.,Arinaga | And 3 more authors.
Zootaxa | Year: 2011

Five new species of Napaeus are described, four from Gran Canaria and one from El Hierro (Canary Islands): Napaeus josei n. sp., N. venegueraensis n. sp., N. arinagaensis n. sp., N. validoi n. sp. and N. grohi n. sp. The main differences from the most similar species and data on distribution are presented. At least three of the new species disguise their shells with soil, presumably to avoid predation.Copyright © 2011 . Magnolia Press. Source


Holyoak D.T.,Quinta da Cachopa | Holyoak G.A.,Quinta da Cachopa | Yanes Y.,University of Cincinnati | Santana J.,University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Conchology | Year: 2014

An undescribed small land-snail discovered recently on Gran Canaria (Canary Islands) is named as Vermetum tamadabaensis. The generic placement is based on close similarity of its shells to those of V. festinans, which is known only by shells from La Palma in the same archipelago. The genital anatomy of V. tamadabaensis shows characters distinctive of Gastrodontidae rather than Pristilomatidae, including presence of a sarcobelum containing a dart and three "bridges", respectively joining the base of the penis to the free oviduct, the sarcobelum with duct of the bursa copulatrix, and the bursa duct to the epiphallus. Some of the anatomical features suggest affinity to Zonitoides, but others are peculiar. Source


Yanes Y.,CSIC - Experimental Station of El Zaidin | Martin J.,El Coromoto | Santana J.,University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria | Holyoak G.A.,Quinta da Cachopa | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Conchology | Year: 2011

Four new species of Napaeus are described from La Gomera (Canary Islands), which is one of the smaller islands of the archipelago but has the highest number of Napaeus species. The four new species can all disguise the shell with a cover of lichens, soil, or both, to reduce predation. When the covering is made of hygroscopic lichen, it might function as a water or humidity reservoir as well as for camouflage. Source


Artiles M.,Arinaga | Yanes Y.,University of Cincinnati | Alonso M.R.,University of La Laguna | Ibanez M.,University of La Laguna
Journal of Conchology | Year: 2013

Three new species of the genus Napaeus (Albers 1850) are described from La Gomera (Canary Islands). This is one of the smaller islands of the archipelago but it has the highest number (26) of living species of the genus. Shells o/Napaeus species on La Gomera include the shortest, the most slender, the longest and the widest in the genus and show significant diversity in shell colour. Moreover, the Napaeus species from La Gomera exhibit more different patterns of genital system anatomy (five) than the whole of the genus in all the other Canary islands together (four patterns, one of which is also present on La Gomera). Hesse's subgenera Napaeus and Napaeinus correspond to two of the eight anatomical patterns involved. At least adults of N. doloresae n. sp. and juveniles of the other new species described can disguise their shells with a cover of soil, apparently to reduce predation. Source

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