Argentine Navy

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Argentine Navy

Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Garcia R.E.,Argentine Navy | Martinez V.L.,Argentine Navy | Franco J.I.,Institute of Scientific and Technological Research for Defense | Curutchet G.,National University of General San Martín
International Journal of Hydrogen Energy | Year: 2012

Current processes used for the production of hydrogen consume a great part of the energy they produce and/or depend on fossil fuel consumption, making them inefficient and harmful to the environment. Obtaining hydrogen from living systems by fermentation of organic matter considered waste is a promising alternative for the future. Especially when you take into account that the biological production of hydrogen is intrinsically linked to the degradation of said organic matter. In this paper, we explore the efficiency of different bacterial communities (also called consortia) for anaerobic fermentation of carbohydrates. The evaluated consortia were obtained from soil, commercial compost and sludge from a sewage treatment plant. The cultures that produced the highest amounts of hydrogen were those in which the inoculums used came from sludge and compost. Both reached a maximum accumulated concentration of approximately 30% of biological hydrogen in the gas mixture on day 8 of the fermentation process, as estimated by gas chromatography. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Martinez V.L.,Argentine Navy | Garcia R.E.,Argentine Navy | Curutchet G.,National University of General San Martín | Sanguinetti A.,Institute of Scientific and Technological Research for Defense | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Hydrogen Energy | Year: 2012

Methanogenic and hydrogen-producing bacteria constitute anaerobic bacterial communities. Inhibition of the methanogenic population is a suitable way of enhancing the production of hydrogen, and obtaining abundant and clean quantities of it. In this work, bacteria present in a culture were treated with sucrose solution and the resulting gases operated fuel cells without any further purification processes. The mixture containing hydrogen and other gaseous products (bio-H 2) was introduced into a syringe and a eudiometer. As the cell consumed H 2 and generated electricity, the volume of gas introduced decreased. Three different methods of evaluation were employed to calculate H 2 percentage in the mixture, and were compared with the percentage obtained by chromatography. The excellent correlation between these measures demonstrates acceptable validity of the proposed methods, that the mixture does not contain harmful substances for the Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells and that the obtained bio-H 2 can be used without further purification. © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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